History of Art and Architecture

http://arthistory.uoregon.edu

Kate Mondloch, Department Head
541-346-3675
237D Lawrence Hall
5229 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-5229

The Department of the History of Art and Architecture offers study in the principal art and architectural traditions of Europe, Asia, the Americas, and the Pacific. Courses are appropriate for students interested in history, art, and the larger cultural context of society. They are also suitable for students intending to concentrate on the practice of art or environmental design. The undergraduate program prepares students for graduate studies in art history; it also leads to opportunities in the business world, art museums, and galleries. The graduate program emphasizes both breadth and depth, and it is characterized by close working relationships between students and faculty.

Preparation

When possible, students expecting to transfer to the art history program from two-year colleges should include in their program the equivalent of the history of Western art surveys—History of Western Art I (ARH 204), History of Western Art II (ARH 205), History of Western Art III (ARH 206)—or the history of Asian art surveys—History of Chinese Art (ARH 208), History of Japanese Art (ARH 209), Contemporary Asian Art and Architecture (ARH 210)—and two years of a foreign language. They should also complete as many of the university general-education requirements as possible.

Careers

The undergraduate program in art history leads to opportunities in the business world, art museums, and galleries. Students with graduate degrees in art history can pursue opportunities in teaching at all levels. The department provides career advising; information on career, internship, and fellowship opportunities; and current information on graduate programs.

Financial Assistance

The department offers a number of awards and scholarships for undergraduate and graduate students in art history, including:

  • Mr. and Mrs. Eric G. Clarke Scholarship in Oriental Art
  • Marian C. Donnelly Book Prize
  • Ellen Johnston-Laing Award in Chinese and Japanese Art History
  • Kari Fund
  • Gloria T. Lee Graduate Scholarship in Art History
  • Gloria T. Lee Scholarship in Art History
  • Ina McClung Art Scholarship Award
  • Sponenburgh Endowment for the History of Aesthetics of Sculpture.

Support for travel is available through the Marian C. Donnelly Student Award, the Graduate Travel Award, the Alice Wingwall Award, and Amy and Ross Kari Travel Grant. Students may also seek scholarship aid through the School of Architecture and Allied Arts and the university’s financial aid office.

Faculty

Nina Amstutz, assistant professor (18th- and 19th-century art). BA, 2004, MA 2008, PhD, 2013, Toronto. (2014)

Joyce Cheng, associate professor (modern art). BA, 2001, Northwestern; MA, 2003, PhD, 2009, Chicago. (2009)

Keith Eggener, Marion Dean Ross Distinguished Professor in Architectural History (architectural history). BA, 1985, Portland State; MA, 1989, Washington (Seattle); MA, 1993, Stanford; PhD, 1995, Stanford. (2013)

James Harper, associate professor (Renaissance and baroque art). BA, 1987, Trinity; PhD, 1998, Pennsylvania. (2000)

Ocean Howell, assistant professor (history and architectural history). See Robert Donald Clark Honors College.

Maile Hutterer, assistant professor (medieval art and architecture). BA, 2004, California, Santa Barbara; PhD, 2011, New York University. (2014)

Charles H. Lachman, associate professor (Asian art). AB, 1971, Temple; MA, 1974, McMaster; PhD, 1985, Toronto. (1992)

Jenny Lin, assistant professor (contemporary Asian art). BA, 2003, MA, 2007, Brown; PhD, 2012, California, Los Angeles. (2012)

Kate Mondloch, associate professor (contemporary art); associate director, new media and culture certificate. BA, 1994, Georgetown; MA, 2000, PhD, 2005, California, Los Angeles. (2005)

Kristen Seaman, assistant professor. MA, 2009, PhD, 2009, California, Berkeley. (2015)

Richard A. Sundt, associate professor (history of ancient and medieval architecture). BA, 1967, Indiana; MA, 1973, PhD, 1981, Wisconsin, Madison. (1982)

Akiko Walley, Maude I. Kerns Professor of Asian Art; assistant professor (Japanese art). BA, 1998, MA, 2001, Aoyama Gakuin; AM, 2004, PhD, 2009, Harvard. (2009)

Emeriti

Jeffrey M. Hurwit, professor emeritus. AB, MA, 1971, Brown; MPhil, 1972, PhD, 1975, Yale. (1980)

Esther Jacobson-Tepfer, professor emerita. BA, 1962, MA, 1964, PhD, 1970, Chicago. (1966)

Ellen Johnston Laing, professor emerita. BA, 1954, Missouri; MA, 1956, Wisconsin, Madison; PhD, 1967, Michigan. (1979)

A. Dean McKenzie, professor emeritus. BA, 1952, San Jose State; MA, 1955, California, Berkeley; PhD, 1965, New York University. (1966)

Andrew Morrogh, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1966, Jesus College, Oxford; MA, 1973, PhD, 1983, Courtauld Institute, University of London. (1993)

Kathleen D. Nicholson, professor emerita. BA, 1969, Connecticut; MA, 1971, PhD, 1977, Pennsylvania. (1995)

Leland M. Roth, professor emeritus. BArch, 1966, Illinois; MPhil, 1970, PhD, 1973, Yale. (1978)

W. Sherwin Simmons, professor emeritus. BA, 1967, Yale; MA, 1975, PhD, 1979, Johns Hopkins. (1973)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Participating

Jill Hartz, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

Kenneth I. Helphand, landscape architecture

The major combines the study of art history with liberal and fine arts and leads to the bachelor of arts (BA) degree. The program provides a broad perspective for understanding art, history, and culture as well as a basis for critical judgment of individual works. The department regularly offers courses on art and architecture in the following areas or traditions:

  • ancient (Greek and Roman)
  • medieval
  • Renaissance-baroque
  • modern and contemporary
  • American
  • East Asian (Chinese and Japanese)
  • Courses that treat other areas are also taught from time to time; recent offerings have focused on Latin American, Indian, Korean, African, and Islamic traditions

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Students wanting to major in art history must file an application form with the department, consult with a faculty advisor, and maintain an up-to-date academic record in the department office.

Foreign Language Guidelines

Majors are required to complete the language requirement as described under the university’s bachelor of arts requirements.

French, German, and Italian are the most commonly used languages in Western art history research; Chinese and Japanese are essential for most areas of East Asian art history. Because these languages are required for advanced research and graduate study in art history as well as other humanistic disciplines, majors are urged to choose one of them to satisfy the BA requirement. Substitution of other languages may be appropriate to a field of interest. Students are urged to consult with their advisors when selecting a language for study.

General Requirements
Studio art (e.g., drawing, sculpture, or design)4
Two years of a second language to satisfy BA degree requirements27
ARH 300Critical Approaches to Art-Historical Study4
Eight upper-division courses and electives 1,2,3,432
Option 1: European and American Art History Specialization 116
History of Western Art I-III
History of Chinese Art
History of Japanese Art
Contemporary Asian Art and Architecture
Option 2: Asian Art History Specialization 116
History of Western Art I
History of Western Art II
History of Western Art III
History of Chinese Art
History of Japanese Art
Contemporary Asian Art and Architecture
Option 3: Architectural History Specialization 1
ARH 314–315History of Western Architecture I-II8
Select two of the following:8
Global Masterpieces: Monuments in Context
History of Western Art I
History of Western Art II
History of Western Art III
History of Chinese Art
History of Japanese Art
Contemporary Asian Art and Architecture
History of Design
1

Majors must take art history courses for letter grades and pass them with grades of C– or better.

2

Four of the eight courses must be at the 400 level.

3

For a concentration, students select three areas of interest from the Course Areas list and take two courses from each of those three areas of interest for a total of six courses.

4

Elective requirement: two additional upper-division courses (totaling 8 graded credits) in any area or areas.

Course Areas

  • ancient (Aegean, Greek, Roman)
  • medieval (early Christian, Byzantine, early medieval, Romanesque, Gothic)
  • Renaissance and baroque1
  • modern (18th century through contemporary)1
  • Asian (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian)
1

History of World Architecture I (ARH 314) and History of World Architecture II (ARH 315) do not count as upper-division credits.

Minor Requirements

Students who want a minor in art history must file an application form with the department, consult with the faculty advisor about their minor option, and maintain an up-to-date academic record in the Department of Art History office. The art history minor is offered in three options.

Western Art Minor

ARH 204–206History of Western Art I-III12
Four upper-division art history courses selected from the ancient, medieval, Renaissance-baroque, or modern areas 116
Total Credits28
1

History of World Architecture I (ARH 314) and History of World Architecture II (ARH 315) cannot be use as upper-division courses. Upper-division areas of emphasis should consist of a group of related courses selected in consultation with an advisor.

Asian or Other Non-Western Art Minor

ARH 208History of Chinese Art4
ARH 209History of Japanese Art4
Course to be chosen in consultation with advisor4
Four upper-division art history courses selected from the Asian or other non-Western areas 116
Total Credits28
1

Upper-division areas of emphasis should consist of a group of related courses selected in consultation with an advisor.

Architectural History Minor

ARH 314–315History of Western Architecture I-II8
Select one of the following:4
History of Western Art I-III
History of Chinese Art
History of Japanese Art
Four upper-division courses in architectural history 114-16
Total Credits26-28
1

Upper-division areas of emphasis should consist of a group of related courses selected in consultation with an advisor.

Nonmajors, subject to general university requirements, may take any department course either for a letter grade or pass/no pass (P/N).

Honors Program

In the senior year, an art history major may apply to the chair of the undergraduate committee for the department's honors program if he or she has

  • completed at least 40 credits in history of art and architecture courses with a 3.75 GPA
  • completed Critical Approaches to Art-Historical Study (ARH 300) with a grade of A– or better
  • completed the last term of the second year of the second-language requirement with a grade of A– or better

The applicant must have a departmental faculty member agree to supervise research on a topic related to the faculty member's interest and to serve as director of the student's honors essay.

The applicant who satisfies all of the above requirements and presents the undergraduate committee chair with a faculty member's written agreement to serve as honors advisor is admitted to the honors program, typically at the beginning of winter term.

The honors candidate typically registers for 3 to 6 credits of Research: [Topic] (ARH 401) during winter term of the senior year to undertake research in preparation for writing the honors essay, and 4 credits of Thesis (ARH 403) in spring term, when writing the essay.

Students are urged to present a first draft of the essay to the faculty adviser six weeks before the end of the term, and a final draft must be submitted two weeks before the end of the same term.

The honors essay must demonstrate the student's ability to formulate a significant research problem and to handle sources in at least one foreign language, if relevant. The essay should have twenty to twenty-five pages of text, not including notes in text, endnotes, bibliography, and illustrations. A copy of the honors essay is deposited in departmental files. The candidate whose essay is approved by the faculty adviser and who maintains a 3.75 GPA in all history of art and architecture courses required for the major is awarded departmental honors.

 

The Department of the History of Art and Architecture offers programs leading to the master of arts (MA) and the doctor of philosophy (PhD) degrees in art history with specialization in architectural history and ancient, medieval, Renaissance-baroque, modern, and Asian art. The department offers Oregon’s only graduate degree program in art history. It is tailored to meet the needs and objectives of two kinds of students: those who seek careers in the academic, art-related business, or museum worlds immediately upon completion of the MA degree, and those who want to acquire a solid foundation in the field before pursuing studies leading to a PhD degree.

Applications to the graduate program are considered once a year on January 15 for the following fall term. Applications and supporting documents, including Graduate Record Examinations scores, must be received by January 15.

Master of Arts

Students who have successfully completed undergraduate programs in art history, history, or languages and literature are particularly encouraged to consider graduate studies in art history.

Requirements

Candidates for the MA degree must complete 45 credits in courses approved by the student's advisor, as well as satisfy the general requirements of the Graduate School for residence. Of the 45 credits, a minimum of 36 must be graduate credits in research-based courses, taken for a letter grade.

  1. Thesis (ARH 503), 9 credits
  2. Of the 36 graduate credits required, 16 must be in graduate seminars, including 4 credits in Graduate Studies in Art History (ARH 611) and 8 credits in Seminar: [Topic] (ARH 607)
  3. Electives. A minimum of 12 credits of elective courses; a maximum of 8 credits may be taken outside of the department with an advisor's permission
  4. Distribution Requirement. Students must undertake course work in three of four historic areas: prehistoric-ancient, medieval, early modern, and modern-contemporary. Students may petition to apply a thematic or nonperiod-specific course toward the distribution requirement by demonstrating substantial work in the appropriate area. Students are strongly recommended to pursue both Western and non-Western courses to fulfill their distribution and elective requirements
  5. First-year students are required to enroll in the following:
    • Seminar series (three courses, 4 credits each, graded): Graduate Studies in Art History (ARH 611) (fall), Seminar: [Topic] (ARH 607) (winter), Seminar: [Topic] (ARH 607) (spring)
  6. Foreign Language Requirement. The department recommends that degree candidates demonstrate reading proficiency in at least one foreign language by the end of their first year in the program (typically in French or German, or in Chinese or Japanese where appropriate). The language must be approved by the student's advisor and should be relevant to the student's scholarly interests. The proficiency is demonstrated in one of three ways:
    • Passing the written language examination given by the department
    • Presenting satisfactory passing results (above the 50th percentile) on the standardized, national Graduate School Foreign Language Test (GSFLT) or the equivalent
    • Providing an official transcript that shows a passing grade in third-year language course work

Further details about requirements for the MA degree are available from the department office.

Doctor of Philosophy

Students are not usually admitted to the PhD program unless they have successfully completed a master’s degree in art history or a closely related field. Course work for the degree consists of 48 post-MA credits, selected with the advice and consent of the student’s advisor.

Foreign Language Requirement

Students should acquire a research capability in a second foreign language appropriate to the student’s area of study as soon as possible in their academic program.

Advancement to Candidacy

Students are officially advanced to candidacy in the PhD program upon completion of comprehensive examinations in three areas of art history: two related areas, in one of which the dissertation is written, and a third unrelated area. These areas are selected from an established list in the department. The comprehensive examinations should be taken before completion of the 48 credits beyond the MA. More information is available from the Department of the History of Art and Architecture.

Courses

Course usage information

ARH 101. Global Masterpieces: Monuments in Context. 4 Credits.

Introduction to art and architectural history through examination of thirteen key sites from around the world. Themes include religion, politics, domesticity, and modernity.

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ARH 199. Special Studies: [Topic}. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 204. History of Western Art I. 4 Credits.

Historical survey of visual arts. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the ancient cultures producing them.

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ARH 205. History of Western Art II. 4 Credits.

Historical survey of visual arts. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the medieval to early Renaissance cultures producing them.

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ARH 206. History of Western Art III. 4 Credits.

Historical survey of visual arts. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the Renaissance to modern cultures producing them.

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ARH 208. History of Chinese Art. 4 Credits.

Historical survey of the visual arts of China. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the culture in which they were produced.

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ARH 209. History of Japanese Art. 4 Credits.

Historical survey of the visual arts of Japan. Selected works of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts studied in relation to the culture in which they were produced.

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ARH 210. Contemporary Asian Art and Architecture. 4 Credits.

Broad survey of modern and contemporary Asian art, architecture, and film.

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ARH 300. Critical Approaches to Art-Historical Study. 4 Credits.

Methodologies used to study art history (historic, iconographic, formal). Materials drawn from Asian and Western artistic traditions; bibliography, oral presentations, and papers.
Prereq: junior standing, major status.

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ARH 314. History of World Architecture I. 4 Credits.

Survey of global architectural developments from prehistory to the Middle Ages. Series with ARH 315.

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ARH 315. History of World Architecture II. 4 Credits.

Survey of global architectural developments from the Renaissance to the present. Series with ARH 314.

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ARH 320M. History of Jewish Art. 4 Credits.

Survey of Jewish art from antiquity to the present; concentrates on synagogues, ceremonial art, manuscripts, and modern artists and cities. Multilisted with JDST 320M.

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ARH 322. Art of Ancient Greece. 4 Credits.

Introduction to major traditions, functions, and styles of Greek art from the Bronze Age through the Archaic to the Classical and Hellenistic periods.

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ARH 323. Art of Ancient Rome. 4 Credits.

Introduction to major traditions, functions, and styles of the art of ancient Italy and the Roman Empire, from the Etruscans through the Republic to the art of Constantine the Great.

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ARH 324. Art and Politics in the Ancient World. 4 Credits.

Use of art and architecture by leading figures and states to shape and express the political environment and ideologies of the ancient world. Propagandistic art from Egypt to Rome.

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ARH 326. The Acropolis of Athens. 4 Credits.

The principal architectural and sculptural monuments of the Athenian Acropolis. Emphasis on works from the Age of Pericles. Selected literary texts read in translation.

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ARH 331. Cultures of the Medieval West. 4 Credits.

Explores distinct cultural moments during the Middle Ages (c. 650–1200), drawing on its multicultural character¿analyzing its art and its historical, social, religious, racial, and class systems.

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ARH 341. Italian Renaissance Art. 4 Credits.

Painting and sculpture of the Renaissance and mannerist periods analyzed in terms of style, iconography, theory, patronage, and social context.

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ARH 342. Southern Baroque Art. 4 Credits.

Italian and Spanish art of the late 16th and the 17th centuries. Focus on Caravaggio, Carracci, Bernini, Velazquez, other leading artists.

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ARH 343. Northern Renaissance Art. 4 Credits.

Painting and graphic arts in the Netherlands, Germany, and France in the 15th and 16th centuries. Van Eyck, Durer, Holbein, other leading artists. Harper.

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ARH 344. Northern Baroque Art. 4 Credits.

North Netherlandish, Flemish, and French art of the late 16th and 17th centuries. Changes in patrons, markets, and meaning for art. Rembrandt, Vermeer, Rubens, Poussin, other leading artists.

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ARH 350. History of Manga. 4 Credits.

Survey of the history of manga (Japanese comics) from the 19th century to the present.

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ARH 351. 19th-Century Art. 4 Credits.

Introduction to artistic movements in Europe from 1780 to the 1880s including neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, and impressionism.

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ARH 353. Modern Art, 1880–1950. 4 Credits.

Modern art from postimpressionism to abstract expressionism in relation to intellectual and historical developments. Series with ARH 354.

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ARH 354. Art since 1945. 4 Credits.

Modern and postmodern art from abstract expressionism to the present in relation to intellectual and historical developments. Series with ARH 353.

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ARH 358. History of Design. 4 Credits.

Design from the late 18th century to the present--considered in relation to social, political, and technological developments.

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ARH 359. History of Photography. 4 Credits.

Photography from the early 19th-century to the present, aesthetics of the medium, its relationship to painting and the graphic arts, and its social role.

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ARH 387. Chinese Buddhist Art. 4 Credits.

Introduction to selective aspects of the history of Buddhist art in China. Emphasis on sculpture and painting.

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ARH 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable. Offerings vary from year to year and reflect the interests of faculty members.

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ARH 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 403. Thesis. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: ARH 401; major standing.

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ARH 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 406. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable. Offerings vary from year to year and reflect the interests of faculty members.

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ARH 424. Classical Greek Art. 4 Credits.

Greek art in the 5th and 4th centuries BC. Emphasizes major artistic programs of Olympia and Athens and classical attitudes toward the representation of the human form.
Prereq: ARH 204 or 322.

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ARH 463. Native American Architecture. 4 Credits.

Examination of building traditions among native peoples of North America. Explores cosmological symbolism, building techniques, materials, settlements, and influences of culture and climate.

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ARH 465. American Architecture II. 4 Credits.

Major developments in American architecture, 1800–1900. Includes the rediscovery of national symbols, the impact of industry, and the national focus on the single-family residence.
Prereq: ARH 206 or 315.

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ARH 466. American Architecture III. 4 Credits.

Major developments in American architecture, 1885 to the present. Emphasizes academicism, the impact of international modernism, and the rediscovery of eclectic symbolism.
Prereq: ARH 206 or 315.

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ARH 467. Chicago Architecture. 4 Credits.

The development of architecture in this especially American city, focusing on the invention of the skyscraper and the suburban family home.
Prereq: ARH 313 or 465 or 466.

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ARH 468. Oregon Architecture. 4 Credits.

Exploration of the development of architecture in the Oregon territory from prehistoric times to the present. Includes settlements, building types, urban planning, and civil engineering.
Prereq: ARH 315 or 465 or 466.

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ARH 477. History of Landscape Architecture I. 4 Credits.

History of landscape architecture focusing on the garden and public open spaces. Development of the garden from its origins until the 17th century.

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ARH 478. History of Landscape Architecture II. 4 Credits.

History of landscape architecture focusing on the garden and public open spaces. Landscape design of the 18th and 19th centuries, emphasizing the design of public open spaces and the Anglo-American tradition, American and 20th-century landscape architecture.

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ARH 488. Japanese Prints. 4 Credits.

The woodblock print in Japan as part of the cultural, social, and political conditions.

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ARH 503. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable. Offerings vary from year to year and reflect the interests of faculty members.

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ARH 524. Classical Greek Art. 4 Credits.

Greek art in the 5th and 4th centuries BC. Emphasizes major artistic programs of Olympia and Athens and classical attitudes toward the representation of the human form.

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ARH 563. Native American Architecture. 4 Credits.

Examination of building traditions among native peoples of North America. Explores cosmological symbolism, building techniques, materials, settlements, and influences of culture and climate.

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ARH 565. American Architecture II. 4 Credits.

Major developments in American architecture, 1800–1900. Includes the rediscovery of national symbols, the impact of industry, and the national focus on the single-family residence.

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ARH 566. American Architecture III. 4 Credits.

Major developments in American architecture, 1885 to the present. Emphasizes academicism, the impact of international modernism, and the rediscovery of eclectic symbolism.

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ARH 567. Chicago Architecture. 4 Credits.

The development of architecture in this especially American city, focusing on the invention of the skyscraper and the suburban family home.
Prereq: ARH 465/565, 466/566.

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ARH 568. Oregon Architecture. 4 Credits.

Exploration of the development of architecture in the Oregon territory from prehistoric times to the present. Includes settlements, building types, urban planning, and civil engineering.
Prereq: ARH 465/565 or 466/566.

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ARH 577. History of Landscape Architecture I. 4 Credits.

History of landscape architecture focusing on the garden and public open spaces. Development of the garden from its origins until the 17th century.

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ARH 578. History of Landscape Architecture II. 4 Credits.

History of landscape architecture focusing on the garden and public open spaces. Landscape design of the 18th and 19th centuries, emphasizing the design of public open spaces and the Anglo-American tradition, American and 20th-century landscape architecture.

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ARH 588. Japanese Prints. 4 Credits.

The woodblock print in Japan as part of the cultural, social, and political conditions.

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ARH 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 603. Dissertation. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Departmental offerings vary from year to year and reflect the specialized interests of faculty members.

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ARH 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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ARH 611. Graduate Studies in Art History. 4 Credits.

Introduction to bibliographic resources research methodology, and critical issues in art history.
Prereq: major standing.