Historic Preservation

http://hp.uoregon.edu

James Buckley, Program Director
503-412-3718
70 NW Couch Street, Floor 4R
Portland, Oregon 97209

The University of Oregon’s Historic Preservation Program is housed within the School of Architecture and Allied Arts. The graduate program was established in 1980, and an undergraduate minor open to all university majors was initiated in 1987.

The Historic Preservation Program is best described as having broad cultural concerns with a technical emphasis. Attention is given to historic places, buildings, and landscapes in terms of their specific forms, materials, construction, and use. The cultural and theoretical context in which they were developed is addressed, as is the impact of time upon their materials, meanings, and needs. The technologies, interpretations, and means for sustaining the presence of historic places in the future are also emphasized.

Students gain an understanding of historic resources and the processes for their preservation. This includes core courses in research methods, preservation history and theory, architectural history, and the economic, legal, and administrative processes of preservation. Students choose from three focal areas:

  1. sustainable preservation theory, design, and technology
  2. cultural resource management
  3. resource identification and evaluation

Other focal areas are feasible but must be approved in advance by the submission of a curriculum plan by the student by the second term of the student’s first year.

Courses are augmented by fieldwork in the urban, suburban, and rural areas of the region. Oregon contains Native American sites, rural buildings and landscapes developed by U.S. and European immigrant pioneers from the 1830s, as well as urban development since the 1840s. More recent transformations of the landscape by various ethnic groups and technological innovations are also explored. Extensive instructional use of the region takes place through an emphasis on the cultural and technical aspects of vernacular resources, field trips, participation in projects at the university, and through local community groups. There is also frequent involvement with the area’s professionals, officials, and agencies concerned with historic resources.

Recent opportunities for experience include window restoration and traditional earth construction workshops, documentation for a Historic American Buildings Survey for the Alaska Regional Office of the National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior; a preservation field guide for the community of Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve; a condition assessment and stabilization of Gilbert’s Cabin in North Cascades National Park; a condition assessment of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Usonian Gordon House in Silverton, Oregon; the documentation of the Finney House frontier cabin in Nevada City, Montana; the limestone roof replacement on a late sixteenth-century stone cottage on the island of Drvenik Veli, Croatia; and the reconstruction of the Ferry House porch in Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, Whidbey Island, Washington.

In addition to providing hands-on training in what might be considered mainstream preservation activities, the program emphasizes the importance of cultural conservation including issues of diversity, identity, and community development. This includes a concern not only for how various ethnic groups shaped buildings and landscapes in the distant past, but how similar settings are reproduced by cultural groups in the present. Individual research efforts by students are augmented by visiting lecturers, such as those by Boyd Pratt, Jean Carroon, and Gunny Harboe.

Beyond completing core and focal area courses, each student is required to complete individualized study, including reading and thesis research, a summer internship, and a thesis or terminal project. Some former students have chosen to develop specialties and concurrent master’s degrees in closely related fields such as architecture, landscape architecture, and planning, public policy and management; others have created more unique combinations with studies in museums, economic development, and Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies. Besides encouraging students to develop an individualized course of study, the program is characterized by students who exhibit self-motivation and individual initiative. These traits, which are not only expected but are also necessary for successful completion of the program, contribute to the professional growth of students. Graduates of the Historic Preservation Program are employed in preservation-related fields over a wide geographic area. Some choose to pursue work in the private sector as specialists in architectural offices or as consultants. Others serve in the public sector with municipal planning departments, state historic preservation offices, or federal cultural resources divisions. Some graduates choose to work with nonprofit agencies, while others select careers in preservation and restoration.

 

Faculty

Lauren Allsopp, instructor (historic preservation). BA, 1976, Michigan, Ann Arbor; MS, 1980, Columbia; PhD, 1988, Edinburgh. (2012)

Christopher Bell, instructor (historic preservation). BA, 1998, Williams; MS, 2005, Oregon. (2009)

Elizabeth Carter, instructor (historic preservation). BA, 1988, MS, 1994, Oregon. (2005)

Eric L. Eisemann, instructor (legal issues). BA, 1974, Knox; MA, 1980, Western Kentucky; JD, 1994, Lewis and Clark. (1984)

Jessica Engeman, adjunct instructor (historic preservation, planning). BA, 2001, MS, MCRP, 2004, Oregon. (2005)

Kingston Heath, professor (historic preservation). BA, 1968, Lake Forest; MA, 1975, Chicago; MA, 1978, PhD, 1985, Brown. (2003)

Amy Miller Dowell, adjunct instructor (historic preservation). BA, 1982, California, Berkeley; MArch, MS, 1986, Columbia. (2012)

Rick Minor, courtesy adjunct instructor (archaeology). BA, 1972, California State, Fullerton; MA, 1973, PhD, 1983, Oregon. (2009)

Suzana Radivojevic, adjunct instructor (wood science). BScFE, 1997, Belgrade; PhD, 2006, Toronto. (2013)

Kirk Ranzetta, instructor (historic preservation, planning). BA, 1994, Mary Washington; MA, 1996, PhD, 2006, Delaware. (2006)

Shannon Sardell, instructor (historic preservation). BArch, 2001, MS, 2006, Oregon. (2008)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Participating

Erin Cunningham, architecture

Howard Davis, architecture

Keith Eggener, history of art and architecture

Mark Eischeid, landscape architecture

Mark Gillem, architecture

Maile Hutterer, history of art and architecture

Renee A. Irvin, planning, public policy and management

Robert Z. Melnick, landscape architecture

Robert L. Thallon, architecture

Jenny Young, architecture

Undergraduate Studies

Historic preservation is an inherently interdisciplinary field. The minor is particularly well-suited for students studying anthropology, architecture, history, the history of art and architecture, landscape architecture, and planning, public policy and management. Undergraduate students, no matter their major, are eligible to enroll in the minor, however.

The interdisciplinary minor in historic preservation requires a minimum of 27 credits as described below. The lowest accepted passing grade for courses used to complete the undergraduate minor in historic preservation is a C– or better. Some courses required for the minor are only offered every other year.

Minor Program

Core Courses
AAAP 411Introduction to Historic Preservation3
Select three of the following:12
Workshop: [Topic] (Pacific Northwest Field School)
Experimental Course: [Topic] (see program for current, approved offerings)
Transportation and Preservation
American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective I
American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective II
American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective III
Historical Archaeology in Preservation
Legal Issues in Historic Preservation
Historic Survey and Inventory Methodology
Preservation Economics
Overseas Experimental Program: Europe
Related Courses
Select courses from the following:12
National Register Nomination
Museum Education
Cultural Policy
Cultural Resource Management
The Anthropology Museum
Architectural Contexts: Place and Culture
Human Context of Design
Building Construction
Native American Architecture
American Architecture II
American Architecture III
Oregon Architecture
North American Historical Landscapes
GIScience I
Contemporary American Landscape
Grant Proposal Writing
Justice and Urban Revitalization
Sustainable Urban Development
Collaborative Planning and Management
Public Participation in Diverse Communities
Nonprofit Management I
Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations
Total Credits27

Courses from other university departments may be substituted with approval of the program director.

To declare the minor, please complete the undergraduate minor intent form and schedule an advising appointment with the program director, Kingston Heath (kwheath@uoregon.edu), to clarify your goals for enrolling in the program and map out your curriculum. Once complete, submit your signed intent form to the program office.

Graduate Studies

A master of science (MS) degree in historic preservation is offered by the School of Architecture and Allied Arts. Although no particular training is preferred, students whose backgrounds are primarily in historic preservation, architecture, landscape architecture, and architectural history are most prepared for this program. Course work includes training in the social sciences, preservation theory and law, the characteristics of historic buildings and landscapes, historic building technology, and the procedures for evaluating and recording historic sites and buildings.

The program is administered by the Historic Preservation Committee, an interdepartmental committee in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts.

Admission

Applications to the graduate program should contain the following:

  1. Completed online application and fee
  2. Biographical summary
  3. Educational and professional summary
  4. Statement of intent
  5. Selected examples of written material, graphic work, or both
  6. Official transcripts of all college work
  7. Three letters of recommendation, preferably from academic or professional sources

Students whose first language is not English must submit Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores of at least 88.

Students who want to participate in the program through the Western Regional Graduate Program (WRGP) should inquire at the historic preservation office or the Graduate School.

General university regulations about graduate admission are described in the Graduate School section of this catalog.

The application deadline is January 15 for admission the following fall term. Requests for more information and application materials should be directed to the office staff of the Historic Preservation Program at histpres@uoregon.edu or the graduate administrative fellow (available September–June) at hpgtf@uoregon.edu. Information is also available on the program’s website.

Master of Science Requirements

The MS degree in historic preservation requires 73 credits in five areas: historic preservation core courses, architectural history core courses, focal area courses, approved electives, and individualized study courses, which include thesis or terminal project, research, and an internship. Students choose one of three focal areas in which to specialize—sustainable preservation theory, design, and technology; cultural resource management; or resource identification and evaluation.

Historic Preservation Core
AAAP 508Workshop: [Topic] (Pacific Northwest Field School)2
AAAP 511Introduction to Historic Preservation3
AAAP 531National Register Nomination3
AAAP 541Legal Issues in Historic Preservation3
or AAAP 515 Transportation and Preservation
or AAAP 545 Preservation Economics
AAAP 551Historic Survey and Inventory Methodology3
AAAP 610Experimental Course: [Topic] (Thesis Proposal)3
Architectural History Core
Select two of the following: 18
American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective I
American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective II
American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective III
Select one additional course (from the approved list) about the history of architecture, landscape architecture, interior architecture, or the history of building construction 14
Focal Area
Courses (see Focal Areas section below)18
Electives
Courses in other focal areas, from approved list of courses, or in other departments with advisor approval7
Individualized Study 2
AAAP 601Research: [Topic]2
AAAP 609Practicum: [Topic] (Internship I)2
AAAP 607Seminar: [Topic] (Internship II)3
AAAP 503Thesis 312
or AAAP 611 Terminal Project
Total Credits73
1

Courses must be taken for a letter grade.

2

An internship is included in the Individualized Study requirements.

3

Before enrolling in Thesis (AAAP 503) or Terminal Project (AAAP 611), the student must develop a project proposal and have it approved by a committee of two or more members, at least one of whom must be University of Oregon faculty members. When the thesis or terminal project nears completion, the student must present the results of the project to faculty members and students and gain final approval of the project’s documentation from the faculty committee. Requirements for the final presentation are listed in the current graduate program guide. 

Focal Areas

The three focal areas described in this section reflect the particular interest areas and professional careers that are traditionally sought by program graduates. To focus their studies, students select courses from one of the three areas. Those who want to pursue a broader range of interests may select courses from more than one of the focal areas and develop an approved alternative focal area. It is the student’s responsibility to construct such an alternative focal area and present it to the program director for approval no later than the second quarter of the first year of study. A full list of courses for each focal area are available on the program website: hp.uoregon.edu/master-science-degree-requirements.

  • Sustainable Preservation Theory, Design, and Technology. Focusing on the practice of preservation, emphasis is placed on the skills needed to research, plan, and direct the restoration and adaptive reuse of buildings, places, and landscapes as well as to determine the appropriate levels of treatment. 
  • Cultural Resource Management. Embodied in historic preservation is the management of cultural resources. This focal area provides the legal, planning, and management skills needed for individuals to work within organizations that support efforts to manage cultural resources in both the public and private sectors.
  • Resource Identification and Evaluation. This focal area reveals the insights and investigative tools for archival and cultural resource research to establish the history and context of buildings, interior spaces, and landscapes that determined settlement, organization, and a sense of place.
Course usage information

AAAP 120. University of Oregon: Preservation and Place. 4 Credits.

Study of the University of Oregon’s historic physical environment as understood through the lens of historic preservation and complementary disciplines.

Course usage information

AAAP 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

AAAP 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Current topics are American Building Construction, American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective, Research Methods.

Course usage information

AAAP 411. Introduction to Historic Preservation. 3 Credits.

History, evolution, modern concepts, and professional techniques of historic preservation.

Course usage information

AAAP 415. Transportation and Preservation. 3 Credits.

Addresses compliance issues with preservation laws relating to transportation development. Includes understanding processes and negotiating needs of the resource with the needs of transportation authorities.

Course usage information

AAAP 421. American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective I. 4 Credits.

American built environment from the colonial era to the federal period. Stylistic development and building analysis for preservation; cultural, historical, and physical contexts within building forms.

Course usage information

AAAP 422. American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective II. 4 Credits.

American built environment from the federal period to 1893. Stylistic development and building analysis for preservation; cultural, historical, and physical contexts within building forms.

Course usage information

AAAP 423. American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective III. 4 Credits.

American built environment from 1893 to the present. Stylistic development and building analysis for preservation; cultural, historical, and physical contexts within building forms.

Course usage information

AAAP 431. National Register Nomination. 3 Credits.

Provides information and instruction on all aspects of the National Register program and process. Facilitates completion of registration form.
Prereq: AAAP 411.

Course usage information

AAAP 435. Historical Archaeology in Preservation. 3 Credits.

Explores the interrelationships between historical archaeology and historic preservation, two fields linked together by common interests in documentation, identification, interpretation, and preservation of heritage resources.

Course usage information

AAAP 441. Legal Issues in Historic Preservation. 3 Credits.

Examines constitutional, statutory, and common law affecting historic preservation. Covers First Amendment, eminent domain, due process, police powers, regulatory "takings," and aesthetic zoning.

Course usage information

AAAP 445. Preservation Economics. 3 Credits.

Economics of historic preservation and the financial techniques and incentives used to rehabilitate historic properties in the United States, including adaptive reuse and redevelopment economics. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

AAAP 451. Historic Survey and Inventory Methodology. 3 Credits.

Examines how historic inventories help communities plan for wise use of historic resources. Includes complete reconnaissance and survey documentation for historic properties and development of historic context statement.

Course usage information

AAAP 503. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Current topics are American Building Construction, American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective, Research Methods.

Course usage information

AAAP 511. Introduction to Historic Preservation. 3 Credits.

History, evolution, modern concepts, and professional techniques of historic preservation.

Course usage information

AAAP 515. Transportation and Preservation. 3 Credits.

Addresses compliance issues with preservation laws relating to transportation development. Includes understanding processes and negotiating needs of the resource with the needs of transportation authorities.

Course usage information

AAAP 521. American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective I. 4 Credits.

American built environment from the colonial era to the federal period. Stylistic development and building analysis for preservation; cultural, historical, and physical contexts within building forms.

Course usage information

AAAP 522. American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective II. 4 Credits.

American built environment from the federal period to 1893. Stylistic development and building analysis for preservation; cultural, historical, and physical contexts within building forms.

Course usage information

AAAP 523. American Architecture from a Preservation Perspective III. 4 Credits.

American built environment from 1893 to the present. Stylistic development and building analysis for preservation; cultural, historical, and physical contexts within building forms.

Course usage information

AAAP 531. National Register Nomination. 3 Credits.

Provides information and instruction on all aspects of the National Register program and process. Facilitates completion of registration form.
Prereq: AAAP 511.

Course usage information

AAAP 535. Historical Archaeology in Preservation. 3 Credits.

Explores the interrelationships between historical archaeology and historic preservation, two fields linked together by common interests in documentation, identification, interpretation, and preservation of heritage resources.

Course usage information

AAAP 541. Legal Issues in Historic Preservation. 3 Credits.

Examines constitutional, statutory, and common law affecting historic preservation. Covers First Amendment, eminent domain, due process, police powers, regulatory "takings," and aesthetic zoning.

Course usage information

AAAP 545. Preservation Economics. 3 Credits.

Economics of historic preservation and the financial techniques and incentives used to rehabilitate historic properties in the United States, including adaptive reuse and redevelopment economics. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

AAAP 551. Historic Survey and Inventory Methodology. 3 Credits.

Examines how historic inventories help communities plan for wise use of historic resources. Includes complete reconnaissance and survey documentation for historic properties and development of historic context statement.

Course usage information

AAAP 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 606. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

AAAP 611. Terminal Project. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.