Interior Architecture

Linda K. Zimmer, Department Head
541-346-3656
210 Lawrence Hall
1206 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-1206

The Department of  Interior Architecture provides a comprehensive professional design education within a unique interdisciplinary structure. By integrating subject-area course work with studio design exploration, the program prepares students to act as independent problem-solvers and valuable design-team members.

Shared course work with architecture in the early stages of the undergraduate or graduate curricula provides an interdisciplinary context for study and learning, leading to advanced courses and studies that explore theory, technology, and practice.

Central to the department is the design studio, where students gain experience with the design of interior spaces and elements and focus on the issues and conditions related to adapting existing sites and buildings. Topical intermediate studios concentrate on specific design issues, human factors, and building types. Specialized intermediate studios focus on the programming, design, and fabrication of furniture, and on construction documents that illustrate a small design project. A final independent two-term comprehensive project caps the design studio experience.

Preparation

High school and college students interested in interior architecture should prepare themselves by taking courses in the following subjects:

  1. Fine arts 
  2. Social sciences
  3. Sciences 
  4. Humanities 

Students are encouraged to travel in order to broaden their experiences related to environmental design.

Design Camp

The College of Design offers a summer career exploration program for college-bound students at the school’s facilities in the White Stag Block in downtown Portland. Students explore architecture, product design, and the digital arts in the city and in the studio. Information about Design Camp may be obtained on the website or by calling the College of Design in Portland.

Careers

Most students prepare for entering professional practice with architecture and interior design firms. Other opportunities exist in related areas such as lighting design, furniture design, facilities and space planning, sales or product marketing, branding and environmental design, exhibition design, and other activities related to the designed environment.

Accreditation

Undergraduate and graduate professional-degree curricula in interior architecture are accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA). At the University of Oregon, the bachelor of interior architecture and the master of interior architecture degree programs are accredited by CIDA. The postprofessional master of science in interior architecture (MS) program is not accredited. Admission to the MS program is restricted to applicants who already hold a CIDA-accredited degree or the international equivalent. The interior architecture department is also accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

Internship, Certification, and Licensure

State laws governing interior design registration and licensure vary widely. In those states that have adopted legislation, a professional degree from a CIDA-accredited program is the preferred prerequisite. Candidates must pass an examination established by the National Council of Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ) to become licensed as interior designers in those states with licensing or certification. Rules vary from state to state but typically two years of professional experience are required prior to taking the exam. Students should visit the websites of the CIDA, NASAD, or NCIDQ for further information about accreditation and licensure.

The Interior Architecture Curriculum

The professional curriculum in interior architecture has two principal objectives:

  1. Broad inquiry into the integrative nature of environmental design
  2. A comprehensive professional education that develops the ability to design interior environments ranging from intimate personal spaces to large-scale facilities in a variety of site contexts

Curriculum requirements are published in the UO Catalog and in the department’s Advising Handbook, which includes sample course sequences, grading policies, an explanation of how student progress is monitored through the program, and other advising information. Each student is assigned a faculty advisor and encouraged to consult that advisor for specific information. In addition, a departmental advisor is available for degree checks and other academic advising.

Professional Curriculum

The professional curriculum for the bachelor of interior architecture program and the master of interior architecture program include required design studios, subject area courses, and professional electives.

Architectural and Interior Design Studios

The architectural and interior design studios are social and interactive environments where students work cooperatively with their peers under the guidance of faculty members with frequent input from practicing interior designers, architects, and related-field experts as well as representatives of communities served by the studio’s design explorations. Students learn to respond to complex environmental and cultural contexts through design studio projects that explore interior space within a variety of site contexts. Introductory studios emphasize creativity, design communication skills, and critical thinking fundamental to the design process; intermediate studios emphasize integration of interior architecture subjects with critical design issues; advanced studios emphasize the comprehensive integration of these elements. Student performance in all design studios is graded on a pass/no pass basis and evaluated through written evaluations and exit interviews with faculty members.

Interior Architecture Subjects

Subject area course work develops theory, knowledge, and skills in interior architecture and related design disciplines, with an emphasis on learning interior architecture content in the context of design. This course work develops design skills and examines the influences of place, human activity, spatial order, structure, construction, environmental control, professional practice, and history on the practice of interior design.

Residence Requirements

For transfer students to earn the bachelor of interior architecture (BIArch) or professional master of interior architecture (MIArch) degree, the following minimum course work must be successfully completed in residence:

IARC 488/588Interior Design Comprehensive Project I8
IARC 489/589Interior Design Comprehensive Project II8
Interior architecture design courses12
Interior architecture courses30
Upper-division, writing-intensive general electives 112
Total Credits70

Leave of Absence

See policy statement in the Architecture section of this catalog.

Computer Literacy Requirement

Introductory architecture courses presume a knowledge of computer operations, general-use software, and Internet communications. Students lacking preparation may draw on resources at A&AA Technology Services, the University Teaching and Learning Center, the Library and Learning Commons, or Information Technology services. By the end of their first year in the bachelor’s or master’s program, students are expected to have achieved basic literacy in computer graphics as an integrated tool for architectural design—diagramming, two-dimensional drawing, image processing, three-dimensional modeling, accurate sun casting, parametric modeling, and presentation methods. Students must have an awareness of building information modeling, digital fabrication, building performance analysis software, and geographic information systems.

Students are required to have a high-speed laptop computer and a specified complement of software. Each year the department reviews its software and hardware recommendations. Minimum hardware specifications and software requirements are posted on the department website.

Off-Campus Study

Students may participate in off-campus and international study programs hosted by the Department of Architecture, the Historic Preservation Program, the Department of Landscape Architecture, and the Office of International Affairs. See the Architecture section of this catalog for more information.

Faculty

Kyu-Ho Ahn, associate professor. See Architecture.

Virginia Cartwright, associate professor. See Architecture.

Solmaz Mohammadzadeh Kive, assistant professor. See Architecture.

Esther Hagenlocher, associate professor. See Architecture.

Linda K. Zimmer, associate professor. See Architecture.

The undergraduate programs in interior architecture consist of the bachelor of interior architecture (BIArch) degree and a minor in interior architecture. The curriculum of the five-year professional BIArch degree program is highly structured the first two years and more flexible the last three. This flexibility allows each student to establish a study sequence according to individual interests and needs. Transfer students should be aware that an accelerated program is normally possible only for students who transfer from an accredited interior architecture or interior design program.

Prospective applicants who have a four-year undergraduate degree in any field must apply to the graduate program (see Graduate Admission).

Major Requirements: 225 credits

University requirements include group-satisfying requirements and general electives. They are intended to ensure each student receives an education rich in the liberal arts tradition. Undergraduate students should complete most of the general-education and group-satisfying requirements prior to entry into their first intermediate design studio.

Please see the department website for a complete description of these requirements.

Required Courses

Design Studios
ARCH 283–284Architectural Design I-II12
ARCH 383Architectural Design III6
IARC 484Interior Design 1,224
IARC 486Furniture Design6
IARC 487Working Drawings6
IARC 488–489Interior Design Comprehensive Project I-II16
General Theory
IARC 204Understanding Contemporary Interiors4
Design Media
ARCH 202Design Skills3
ARCH 222Introduction to Architectural Computer Graphics4
ARCH 423Media for Design Development: [Topic]3
Design Arts
ARCH 440Human Context of Design4
IARC 444Furniture: Theory and Analysis3
IARC 445Comprehensive Project Preparation3
IARC 447Color Theory and Application for the Built Environment3
ARCH 450Spatial Composition4
Design Technology
ARCH 470Building Construction4
IARC 471Interior Construction Elements3
IARC 472Interior Finishes and Design Application3
IARC 473Working Drawings in Interior Architecture4
ARCH 492Environmental Control Systems II4
IARC 492Electric Lighting3
Professional Context
ARCH 417Context of the Architectural Profession4
History of Art, Architecture, and Interior Design
IARC 474History of Interior Architecture I3
IARC 475History of Interior Architecture II3
IARC 476History of Interior Architecture III3
Two additional architectural history courses taught in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture or the School of Architecture and Environment8
Electives
300- or 400-level ARCH or IARC courses6
Approved 300- or 400-level courses in allied fields7
Total Credits156

BIArch Sample Plan of Study

Most students graduate in the spring term of their fifth year. However, students who enter the program with a year or more of required university credits may be able to accelerate through the curriculum and graduate in spring of their fourth year.

First Year
FallCredits
WR 121College Composition I 4
IARC 204Understanding Contemporary Interiors 4
ARH 314History of World Architecture I 4
Social science course  4
Winter
WR 122 or 123College Composition II 4
ARCH 202Design Skills 3
ARCH 283Architectural Design I 6
Science course  4
Spring
ARCH 222Introduction to Architectural Computer Graphics 4
ARCH 284Architectural Design II 6
Architectural history elective  4
Second Year
Fall
ARCH 383Architectural Design III 6
ARCH 450Spatial Composition 4
ARCH 470Building Construction 4
Winter
ARCH 440Human Context of Design 4
IARC 471Interior Construction Elements 3
IARC 484Interior Design 6
Arts and letters course  4
Spring
IARC 447Color Theory and Application for the Built Environment 3
IARC 472Interior Finishes and Design Application 3
ARCH 492Environmental Control Systems II 4
Social science course  4
Summer
Optional studio in Eugene, Portland, or abroad  
Third Year
Fall
IARC 444Furniture: Theory and Analysis 3
IARC 474History of Interior Architecture I 3
IARC 484Interior Design 6
Science course  4
Winter
ARCH 423Media for Design Development: [Topic] 3
IARC 475History of Interior Architecture II 3
Subject area elective 1 4
Science course  4
Spring
IARC 476History of Interior Architecture III 3
IARC 484Interior Design 6
Social science course  4
Upper-division general-education elective  4
Summer
Optional studio in Eugene, Portland, or abroad  
Fourth Year
Fall
IARC 484Interior Design 6
IARC 492Electric Lighting 3
Upper-division general-education elective  4
Winter
ARCH 417Context of the Architectural Profession 4
IARC 486Furniture Design 6
Subject area elective  3
Multicultural requirement  
Spring
IARC 473Working Drawings in Interior Architecture 4
IARC 487Working Drawings 6
Subject area elective  4
Upper-division general-education elective  3
Summer
Optional studio in Eugene, Portland, or abroad  
Fifth Year
Fall
IARC 445Comprehensive Project Preparation 3
Subject area elective  3
Arts and letters course  4
Upper-division general-education elective  3
Winter
IARC 488Interior Design Comprehensive Project I 8
Arts and letters course  4
Multicultural requirement  4
Spring
IARC 489Interior Design Comprehensive Project II 8
Upper-division general-education elective  4
 Total Credits: 223

Minor Requirements: 26 credits

Subject Area (Nonstudio) Requirements
IARC 204Understanding Contemporary Interiors4
One intermediate studio is required for programs within the School of Architecture and Environment6
Subject Area Electives 216-22
Seminar: [Topic]
Human Context of Design
Furniture: Theory and Analysis
Color Theory and Application for the Built Environment
Interior Construction Elements 1
Interior Finishes and Design Application 1
Working Drawings in Interior Architecture 1
History of Interior Architecture I
History of Interior Architecture II
History of Interior Architecture III
Electric Lighting 1
Total Credits29

Undergraduates who are enrolled in any major can apply to the minor. Completed applications including supporting academic records are submitted to the Department of Architecture office. Applicants are notified when their applications have been approved. Because the department’s first obligation is to its majors, it cannot guarantee availability of courses for minors. Minors may register if space is available after the needs of majors have been met. Enrollment in the minor program is limited. If the department is unable to accommodate additional minor students, it may suspend admittance to the minor program until space becomes available.

Undergraduate Admission

Grounded in a unique multidisciplinary structure, the Department of Interior Architecture offers a comprehensive accredited professional interior design curriculum. Students are prepared to act as independent interior designers; collaborative experiences teach them to be valuable team members in today’s complex and dynamic design atmosphere.

Interest in the program exceeds the capacity of the department. Approximately equal numbers of first-year and transfer (including change-of-major) applicants are admitted to the first year of the bachelor of architecture program each year. A smaller number of applicants from other CIDA-accredited or -recognized programs are admitted as advanced transfer students. Prospective applicants to the BIArch degree program or the minor in interior architecture may find information about the program and application requirements on the department website.

There are two graduate degree programs in interior architecture: the professional master of interior architecture (MIArch) degree and the postprofessional master of science in interior architecture (MS) degree.

Students interested in pursuing a concurrent master's degree in architecture and interior architecture may find information about the combined program requirements and application procedures on the Department of Architecture website and the department advising handbook.

Professional Master of Interior Architecture Degree Requirements

The professional, CIDA-accredited master of interior architecture (MIArch) degree program prepares students for careers in interior design practice and careers in allied professions that contribute to shaping the built environment.

The department offers two tracks of study. Track I typically takes 10 terms to complete. Track II is a six-term advanced placement program.

Track I

Students enrolled in the MIArch Track I program must complete the following:

Design Studios
IARC 584Interior Design (four terms)24
IARC 586Furniture Design6
IARC 587Working Drawings6
IARC 588–589Interior Design Comprehensive Project I-II16
ARCH 680Introductory Graduate Design6
ARCH 681Introductory Graduate Design6
Media and Process Skills
ARCH 611Graduate Design Process3
Architectural computing course2
Intermediate Media
ARCH 523Media for Design Development: [Topic]3
Design Arts
ARCH 540Human Context of Design4
IARC 545Comprehensive Project Preparation3
IARC 547Color Theory and Application for the Built Environment3
ARCH 550Spatial Composition4
Furniture
IARC 544Furniture: Theory and Analysis3
Design Technology
ARCH 570Building Construction4
IARC 571Interior Construction Elements3
IARC 572Interior Finishes and Design Application3
IARC 573Working Drawings in Interior Architecture4
ARCH 592Environmental Control Systems II4
IARC 592Electric Lighting3
Professional Practice
ARCH 517Context of the Architectural Profession4
Architectural History
IARC 574History of Interior Architecture I3
IARC 575History of Interior Architecture II3
IARC 576History of Interior Architecture III3
One additional architectural history course taught in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture or the School of Architecture and Environment4
Course in 20th-century architectural history4
Subject Area Electives16
Seminar6
Total Credits153

Track I students typically complete all or most of the MIArch degree requirements at the University of Oregon, and begin the program the summer before their first full academic year of study. Students with bachelor’s degrees (BA, BS) other than a preprofessional degree in interior design, interior architecture, or architecture must apply to the Track I program. 

MIArch Track I Sample Plan of Study

SummerCredits
ARCH 611Graduate Design Process 3
ARCH 680Introductory Graduate Design 6
Course in 20th-century architectural history  3
First Year
Fall
ARCH 681Introductory Graduate Design 6
ARCH 570Building Construction 4
ARCH 550Spatial Composition 4
Additional course in design computing 1 2
Winter
ARCH 540Human Context of Design 4
IARC 571Interior Construction Elements 3
IARC 584Interior Design 6
Subject area elective 2 3
Spring
IARC 547Color Theory and Application for the Built Environment 3
IARC 572Interior Finishes and Design Application 3
IARC 584Interior Design 6
ARCH 592Environmental Control Systems II 4
Summer
Optional studio in Eugene, Portland, or abroad  
Second Year
Fall
IARC 544Furniture: Theory and Analysis 3
IARC 574History of Interior Architecture I 3
IARC 584Interior Design 6
IARC 592Electric Lighting 3
Winter
IARC 575History of Interior Architecture II 3
IARC 586Furniture Design 6
Subject area electives 2 6
Spring
ARCH 523Media for Design Development: [Topic] 3
IARC 573Working Drawings in Interior Architecture 4
IARC 576History of Interior Architecture III 3
IARC 587Working Drawings 6
Summer
Optional studio in Eugene, Portland, or abroad  
Third Year
Fall
IARC 545Comprehensive Project Preparation 3
IARC 584Interior Design 6
Architectural history elective  3
Winter
ARCH 517Context of the Architectural Profession 4
IARC 588Interior Design Comprehensive Project I 8
Seminar 2 3
Spring
IARC 589Interior Design Comprehensive Project II 8
Seminar 2 3
Subject area elective 2 3
 Total Credits: 147

Track II

Design Studios
IARC 584Interior Design (two terms)12
IARC 586Furniture Design6
IARC 587Working Drawings6
IARC 588Interior Design Comprehensive Project I8
IARC 589Interior Design Comprehensive Project II8
Media and Process Skills
ARCH 611Graduate Design Process3
Architectural computing course2
Intermediate Media
ARCH 523Media for Design Development: [Topic]3
Design Arts
ARCH 540Human Context of Design4
IARC 545Comprehensive Project Preparation3
IARC 547Color Theory and Application for the Built Environment3
ARCH 550Spatial Composition4
Furniture
IARC 544Furniture: Theory and Analysis3
Design Technology
ARCH 570Building Construction4
IARC 571Interior Construction Elements3
IARC 572Interior Finishes and Design Application3
IARC 573Working Drawings in Interior Architecture4
ARCH 592Environmental Control Systems II4
Professional Practice
ARCH 517Context of the Architectural Profession4
Architectural History
IARC 574–576History of Interior Architecture I-III9
One additional architectural history courses taught in the Department of the History of Art and Architecture or the School of Architecture and Environment4
Course in 20th-century architectural history4
Subject Area Electives 116
Seminar6
Total Credits126

Applicants who have a four-year preprofessional degree in an environmental design discipline (interior architecture, interior design, or architecture) and an equivalent amount of professional studio and course work may be considered for Track II. Students admitted into Track II begin their studies fall term. Track II students must fulfill the same professional curriculum requirements as those in the Track I program, but are admitted with advanced standing in studio and subject-area courses. Transfer credit may be given to students who have had academic experience in an interior architecture or design program accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation, or an architecture program accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). The extent of this advanced standing is determined in consultation with the department academic advisor before beginning the program, and the student's advanced standing is reevaluated at intervals. This preliminary evaluation of transfer credit is provisional, pending satisfactory completion of three terms in residence.

Track II students may receive credit for up to four previously taken design studios and up to 50 credits of subject-area courses. Students usually complete a minimum of six terms and the approximately 87 credits in residence.

Postprofessional Master of Science Degree Requirements

The postprofessional program is for individuals with an undergraduate professional degree in architecture or interior architecture. This degree provides an opportunity for advanced study and contribution to knowledge in the field through the thesis. The course of study prepares students for careers in research, teaching, consulting, and further graduate study. Students also gain a greater understanding of the relationship between the discipline and the profession while working closely with faculty mentors helping to guide their individual research.


Prospective applicants may find information about the program and application requirements on the department website. 

Graduate Admission

Admission to the professional MIArch and postprofessional MS graduate degree programs is through a selective review that focuses on three attributes: creative capability, academic capability, and potential contribution to the program through diversity of background, experience, or demonstrated motivation. Applications include a résumé, a biographical statement, a statement of interest in the field of interior architecture, a portfolio of creative work, three letters of recommendation, and official transcripts from all postsecondary educational institutions attended. Applicants must take the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) so that the scores, a required component of the application, can be reported by the application deadline. Applicants whose first language is not English must also submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) of at least 575 (paper-based) or 90 (Internet-based). Applications must be postmarked by the first Monday after January 1 for applicants to be considered for admission the subsequent fall term (or summer session for MIArch students). Notifications of results are mailed by April 1.

Prospective applicants to the MIArch and MS degree programs may find information about the application requirements on the department website.

Graduate Teaching and Research Fellowships

A number of graduate employment (GE) opportunities are available to well-qualified graduate students. MS or MIArch Track II applicants with previous education in interior architecture or an allied field are encouraged to apply for GTF positions. MIArch Track I students are generally selected in the second or third year of their degree program. Information about the GE application process is available on the Department of Architecture and Graduate School websites.

Courses

Course usage information

IARC 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 204. Understanding Contemporary Interiors. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the theory of interior architecture. Design criteria explored through illustrated lectures and projects involving analysis of space.

Course usage information

IARC 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 444. Furniture: Theory and Analysis. 3 Credits.

Analysis of furniture and cabinetry from a theoretical and practical standpoint. Emphasis on use within architectural space as well as free standing elements. Introduction to structure, construction, and construction installation drawings.
PD 323 or ARCH 484 or IARC 484 or interior architecture minor status.

Course usage information

IARC 445. Comprehensive Project Preparation. 3 Credits.

Formulation of individual design projects for IARC 488/588, 489/589. Development of project issues and documentation of context, site, and building information; includes research, case studies, and programming.
Prereq: IARC 473, 484.

Course usage information

IARC 447. Color Theory and Application for the Built Environment. 3 Credits.

Use of color in the built environment including principal color systems, methods of color harmony, effects of visual phenomena, and various psychological, cultural, and historic implications.
Prereq: PD 350 or ARCH 484 or IARC 484 or interior architecture minor status.

Course usage information

IARC 471. Interior Construction Elements. 3 Credits.

The properties and detailing of materials used in interior design construction. Code issues that affect interior construction field trips to supply sources and projects.
ARCH 470.

Course usage information

IARC 472. Interior Finishes and Design Application. 3 Credits.

The properties, manufacture, application, and code issues, and ecological considerations of interior finish materials. Field trips to supply sources.
ARCH 470

Course usage information

IARC 473. Working Drawings in Interior Architecture. 4 Credits.

Preparation of working drawings for a small, sustainable interior architecture design project.
Prereq: ARCH 462, 484 or IARC 471, 472, 484

Course usage information

IARC 474. History of Interior Architecture I. 3 Credits.

Interior architecture as artistic expression. Includes the study of furnishings, textiles, and other interior traditions.

Course usage information

IARC 475. History of Interior Architecture II. 3 Credits.

Interior architecture as artistic expression. Includes the study of furnishings, textiles, and other interior traditions.

Course usage information

IARC 476. History of Interior Architecture III. 3 Credits.

Interior architecture as artistic expression. Includes the study of furnishings, textiles, and other interior traditions.

Course usage information

IARC 484. Interior Design. 6 Credits.

Repeatable. A series of creative projects in interior design; intensive analysis of design; methods of problem solving; individual criticism, review of design projects; group discussion and field trips.
Prereq: ARCH 383 or IARC 383.

Course usage information

IARC 486. Furniture Design. 6 Credits.

Projects in design and construction of custom furniture, preparation of detailed shop drawings, shop procedure.
Prereq: IARC 444; IARC 484 or ARCH 484.

Course usage information

IARC 487. Working Drawings. 6 Credits.

Focuses on the design of a small, sustainable interior architecture design project and the production of a set of working drawings.
Prereq: ARCH 462, 484 or IARC 471, 472, 484; coreq: IARC 473.

Course usage information

IARC 488. Interior Design Comprehensive Project I. 8 Credits.

Student-initiated studies in interior design for the terminal project. Emphasis on comprehensive and integrative study.
Prereq: IARC 445.

Course usage information

IARC 489. Interior Design Comprehensive Project II. 8 Credits.

Student-initiated studies in interior design for the terminal project. Emphasis on comprehensive and integrative study.
Prereq: IARC 488

Course usage information

IARC 492. Electric Lighting. 3 Credits.

Principles of lighting with focus on integration of electric illumination and space. Design for lighting, calculations, and available systems and sources tested through models and drawings.
Prereq: ARCH 484/584 or IARC 484/584; ARCH 492/592.

Course usage information

IARC 503. Thesis. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 544. Furniture: Theory and Analysis. 3 Credits.

Analysis of furniture and cabinetry from a theoretical and practical standpoint. Emphasis on use within architectural space as well as free standing elements. Introduction to structure, construction, and construction installation drawings.
IARC 484 or ARCH 584

Course usage information

IARC 545. Comprehensive Project Preparation. 3 Credits.

Formulation of individual design projects for IARC 488/588, 489/589. Development of project issues and documentation of context, site, and building information; includes research, case studies, and programming.
Prereq: IARC 573, 584.

Course usage information

IARC 547. Color Theory and Application for the Built Environment. 3 Credits.

Use of color in the built environment including principal color systems, methods of color harmony, effects of visual phenomena, and various psychological, cultural, and historic implications.
Prereq: ARCH 584 or IARC 584.

Course usage information

IARC 571. Interior Construction Elements. 3 Credits.

The properties and detailing of materials used in interior design construction. Code issues that affect interior construction field trips to supply sources and projects.
Prereq: ARCH 570

Course usage information

IARC 572. Interior Finishes and Design Application. 3 Credits.

The properties, manufacture, application, and code issues, and ecological considerations of interior finish materials. Field trips to supply sources.
ARCH 570

Course usage information

IARC 573. Working Drawings in Interior Architecture. 4 Credits.

Preparation of working drawings for a small, sustainable interior architecture design project.
Prereq: ARCH 562, 584 or IARC 571, 572, 584.

Course usage information

IARC 574. History of Interior Architecture I. 3 Credits.

Interior architecture as artistic expression. Includes the study of furnishings, textiles, and other interior traditions.

Course usage information

IARC 575. History of Interior Architecture II. 3 Credits.

Interior architecture as artistic expression. Includes the study of furnishings, textiles, and other interior traditions.

Course usage information

IARC 576. History of Interior Architecture III. 3 Credits.

Interior architecture as artistic expression. Includes the study of furnishings, textiles, and other interior traditions.

Course usage information

IARC 584. Interior Design. 6 Credits.

Repeatable. A series of creative projects in interior design; intensive analysis of design; methods of problem solving; individual criticism, review of design projects; group discussion and field trips.
Prereq: ARCH 681.

Course usage information

IARC 586. Furniture Design. 6 Credits.

Projects in design and construction of custom furniture, preparation of detailed shop drawings, shop procedure.
Prereq: IARC 444/544; ARCH 484/584 or IARC 484/584.

Course usage information

IARC 587. Working Drawings. 6 Credits.

Focuses on the design of a small, sustainable interior architecture design project and the production of a set of working drawings.
Prereq: ARCH 562, 584 or IARC 571, 572, 584; coreq: IARC 573.

Course usage information

IARC 588. Interior Design Comprehensive Project I. 8 Credits.

Student-initiated studies in interior design for the terminal project. Emphasis on comprehensive and integrative study.
Prereq: 36 credits in IARC design studios.

Course usage information

IARC 589. Interior Design Comprehensive Project II. 8 Credits.

Student-initiated studies in interior design for the terminal project. Emphasis on comprehensive and integrative study.
Prereq: IARC 588.

Course usage information

IARC 592. Electric Lighting. 3 Credits.

Principles of lighting with focus on integration of electric illumination and space. Design for lighting, calculations, and available systems and sources tested through models and drawings.
Prereq: ARCH 484/584 or IARC 484/584; ARCH 492/592.

Course usage information

IARC 600M. Temporary Multilisted Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 606. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

IARC 611. Terminal Project. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.