Planning, Public Policy and Management

http://pppm.uoregon.edu

Richard D. Margerum, Department Head
541-346-3635
119 Hendricks Hall
1209 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-1209

Mission Statement

The Department of Planning, Public Policy and Management (PPPM) prepares future public leaders, creates and disseminates new knowledge, and assists communities and organizations in solving society's most pressing issues. The department's faculty and administration is dedicated to

  • the highest standards of scholarship
  • informed theory and empirical evidence
  • engaging the civic community—public, private, and nonprofit—in democratic processes addressing economic, environmental, and social issues
  • seeking good ideas and approaches from around the world and testing their transferability from one area of the globe to another
  • building on the existing strengths of communities and organizations, to increase their capacity to take advantage of opportunities and respond effectively to challenges
  • work that ranges from local to international
  • ecological, social, and economic sustainability

Faculty

Robert J. Choquette, adjunct instructor (strategic planning, project management); graduate programs coordinator. BS, 1982, MUP, 1991, Oregon. (1991)

Vicki Elmer, instructor (eco-districts, infrastructure, sustainability indicators).  BA, 1964, Michigan, Ann Arbor; MUP, 1970, Columbia; PhD, 1991, California, Berkeley. (2011)

Renee A. Irvin, associate professor (nonprofit and philanthropic sector economics, wealth policy). BA, 1984, Oregon; MA, 1991, PhD, 1998, Washington (Seattle). (2001)

Grant Jacobsen, associate professor (environmental economics and policy, energy efficiency, renewable energy). BA, 2005, College of William and Mary; MA, 2006, PhD, 2010, California, Santa Barbara. (2010)

Laura Leete, associate professor (poverty and social policy, work-force policy, nonprofit economics). BA, 1982, California, Berkeley; MA, 1988, PhD, 1992, Harvard. (2007)

Rebecca C. Lewis, assistant professor (land-use policy, sustainable development, state and local finance). BA, 2006, Kentucky; MPP, 2008, PhD, 2011, Maryland, College Park. (2013)

Richard D. Margerum, professor (environmental planning and management, planning processes, conflict management). BA, 1987, Wittenberg; MCP, 1989, Cincinnati; MS, 1992, PhD, 1995, Wisconsin, Madison. (2001)

Dyana Mason, assistant professor (nonprofit management, charitable giving, public management). BA, 1993, Southern California; MBA, 2010, William and Mary; PhD, 2014, Southern California. (2014)

Nicole S. Ngo, assistant professor (health economics, environmental policy, urban sustainability). BA, BS, 2006, California, Irvine; MA, 2010, PhD, 2013, Columbia. (2013)

Robert G. Parker, instructor (land use and growth management, economic development). BS, 1986, Colorado State; MUP, 1989, Oregon. (1989)

Jake Pollack, adjunct instructor (sustainability leadership, cross-cultural communication, organizational transformation); director, Oregon Leadership in Sustainability program. PhD. (2012)

Gerardo Sandoval, associate professor (economic and community development, urban revitalization, immigrant neighborhoods). BS, 2000, California, Davis; MCP, 2002, PhD, 2007, California, Berkeley. (2010)

Marc Schlossberg, professor (geographic information systems, social planning, transportation planning). BBA, 1987, Texas, Austin; MUP, 1995, San Jose State; PhD, 2001, Michigan. (2001)

Megan E. Smith, senior research assistant (community outreach, watershed planning, rural planning). BA, 1990, Southern Oregon State; MCRP, 1996, Oregon. (1996)

Rhonda Smith, instructor (career development, internship planning); internship director. BS, 1979, Missouri, St. Louis; MA, 1996, Oregon. (2007)

Yizhao Yang, associate professor (environmental planning, sustainable living design and analysis, geographic information systems). BArch, 1995, Tianjin; MS, 1998, Tsinghua; MRP, 2001, PhD, 2007, Cornell. (2006)

Courtesy

Robert Doppelt, courtesy senior research associate (environmental governance, sustainable development). BS, 1973, Lewis and Clark; MS, 1975, MS, 1976, Oregon. (2002)

Donald G. Holtgrieve, adjunct assistant professor (local government planning). See Geography.

Cassandra Moseley, courtesy assistant professor (natural resource policy, community-based conservation). BA, 1990, Cornell; MA, 1993, MPhil, 1994, PhD, 1999, Yale. (2002)

Emeriti

Bryan T. Downes, professor emeritus. BS, 1962, MS, 1963, Oregon; PhD, 1966, Washington (St. Louis). (1976)

Maradel K. Gale, associate professor emerita. BA, 1961, Washington State; MA, 1967, Michigan State; JD, 1974, Oregon. (1974)

Judith H. Hibbard, professor emerita. BS, 1974, California State, Northridge; MPH, 1975, California, Los Angeles; DrPH, 1982, California, Berkeley. (1982)

Michael Hibbard, professor emeritus. BS, 1968, California Polytechnic; MSW, 1971, San Diego State; PhD, 1980, California, Los Angeles. (1980)

Carl J. Hosticka, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1965, Brown; PhD, 1976, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (1977)

Robert E. Keith, planning consultant emeritus. BS, 1944, Kansas State; MArch, 1950, Oregon. (1963)

David C. Povey, professor emeritus. BS, 1963, Lewis and Clark; MUP, 1969, PhD, 1972, Cornell. (1973)

Jean Stockard, professor emerita. BA, 1969, MA, 1972, PhD, 1974, Oregon. (1974)

Kenneth C. Tollenaar, director emeritus. BA, 1950, Reed; MA, 1953, Minnesota. (1966)

Edward C. Weeks, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1973, PhD, 1978, California, Irvine. (1978)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Participating

Mark Gillem, architecture

Daniel HoSang, ethnic studies

Nico Larco, architecture

Robert G. Ribe, landscape architecture

Philip J. Romero, finance

Anita M. Weiss, international studies

The undergraduate program provides an interdisciplinary liberal arts education that prepares students for work in the fields of planning, policy, and public and nonprofit management. Through course work that integrates theory and practice, the curriculum focuses on the ways governments, nonprofit organizations, and other institutions solve public problems. Students explore the economic, social, and environmental characteristics of communities and systems of governance to determine effective ways to advance the public’s goals. The curriculum helps students develop knowledge of core issues related to public policy and management as well as a specialized expertise in an area of their choosing. Emphasis is placed on developing skills in research; verbal, written, and digital communication; and working in group settings.

Preparation

Students planning to pursue a major in PPPM should work to develop communication skills, analytical skills, and community experience. A broad liberal arts background, the development of analytical skills, and community volunteer and leadership experiences are excellent preparation for the PPPM major. Premajors should consider course work or experience in English, public speaking, economics, political science, sociology, computer science, mathematics, and volunteer work.

Careers

The bachelor of arts (BA) or bachelor of science (BS) degree in planning, public policy and management provides students with a broad, interdisciplinary, liberal arts background and a sound basis for graduate study in fields such as urban planning, public policy and management, business, law, journalism, and social welfare. In addition, graduates are prepared for entry-level positions in government agencies and nonprofit organizations.

Admission Requirements

The major in PPPM is offered to upper-division students. Students may apply for admission the term prior to achieving upper-division standing. Applicants are considered before this level on a case-by-case basis. Students are encouraged to apply for status as PPPM premajors to receive department correspondence about upcoming courses and opportunities, to receive advising services, and to access courses with reserved spaces for majors. Students must apply and be accepted by the department before earning 30 credits in PPPM courses. Preference in admission is given to applicants who have

  • a grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 or better
  • some experience—paid or volunteer—in public service
  • fulfilled university general-education requirements

Prior to applying for admission to the major, students should take Introduction to Economic Analysis: Microeconomics (EC 201) and at least one of the following three courses: Introduction to Public Policy (PPPM 201), Introduction to City Planning (PPPM 205), or Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector (PPPM 280).

Admission Procedures

The department admits students fall, winter, and spring terms. Admission to the major is effective the following term. The deadline to apply falls on the Monday of the fourth week. To be considered for admission, students must submit the following materials:

  1. Completed application form, available from the department office or website
  2. Brief résumé of education and employment history
  3. Personal statement describing career goals and how the major in PPPM will help achieve those goals. This statement should be limited to two typed, double-spaced pages
  4. Transcripts from all colleges and universities attended

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Core Courses 1
PPPM 201Introduction to Public Policy4
PPPM 205Introduction to City Planning4
PPPM 280Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector4
PPPM 413Quantitative Methods4
PPPM 415Policy and Planning Analysis4
PPPM 434Urban Geographic Information Systems4
PPPM 494Practice of Leadership and Change4
Field of Interest
PPPM electives 232
Total Credits60
1

PPPM majors must take core courses for letter grades and pass them with grades of C– or better. 

2

Up to 12 credits of Internship: [Topic] (PPPM 404) may count toward fulfilling this requirement. All electives must be upper division.

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

Core Courses 1
PPPM 201Introduction to Public Policy4
PPPM 205Introduction to City Planning4
PPPM 280Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector4
PPPM 413Quantitative Methods4
PPPM 415Policy and Planning Analysis4
PPPM 434Urban Geographic Information Systems4
PPPM 494Practice of Leadership and Change4
Field of Interest
PPPM electives 232
Total Credits60
1

PPPM majors must take core courses for letter grades and pass them with grades of C– or better. 

2

Up to 12 credits of Internship: [Topic] (PPPM 404) may count toward fulfilling this requirement. All electives must be upper division.

Students should expect extensive writing, policy analysis, and collaborative projects as part of their education in PPPM. For more information, contact the undergraduate advisor in the department.

Fields of Interest

To develop a personalized area of expertise, students are encouraged to take three or more elective courses focused on a substantive policy area or set of skills in planning and public policy. In addition, students may work with an undergraduate advisor to develop a customized field of interest.

The department's strengths lie in the following fields:

  • urban planning, land use, and the built environment
  • environmental planning and policy
  • nonprofit administration and philanthropy
  • public management
  • social and health policy

Internship

While an internship is optional, it is highly recommended for all PPPM students. Internships offer students real-world opportunities to explore and clarify their interests and career goals, apply academic learning, develop new skills, and network with professionals. This career-building experience prepares students for fellowships, professional positions, or further academic study. Up to 12 credits of Internship: [Topic] (PPPM 404) may be applied to the interest area.

Community Planning Workshop

Undergraduate students have the opportunity to work on applied research projects through the Community Planning Workshop (see more information in the PPPM Graduate section). Admission is by application only.

Thesis and Departmental Honors Program

Students may pursue an undergraduate thesis in PPPM if they are accepted in the departmental honors program, or if they are enrolled in the Clark Honors College. Students may not pursue the thesis option without prior approval; interested students should contact an undergraduate advisor for more information. Students must have a 3.75 GPA to be considered for the departmental honors program; a thesis is required.

Minors

Planning, Public Policy and Management Minor

The planning, public policy and management minor complements majors in the humanities or social sciences—anthropology, geography, political science, or economics, for example. It enhances any student’s undergraduate education with preparation for a variety of professional occupations and graduate study. The minor provides a professional context in which to apply the knowledge, theories, and methods of the student’s major discipline.

Students may declare the minor in planning, public policy and management at any time during or after the term in which they achieve upper-division standing. Materials for declaring the minor are available in the department office.

PPPM 201Introduction to Public Policy 14
PPPM 205Introduction to City Planning 14
PPPM 280Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector 14
PPPM 415Policy and Planning Analysis 14
PPPM electives 212
Total Credits28
1

Must be taken for letter grades and passed with grades of C– or better.

2

As much as 8 credits of Internship: [Topic] (PPPM 404) may be used toward fulfilling this requirement. All electives must be upper-division.

Nonprofit Administration Minor

The PPPM department offers a minor of special value to students interested in a career in the nonprofit sector. Through the minor, students can enhance their undergraduate education to include preparation for occupations and graduate study in nonprofit administration. The nonprofit sector is one of the fastest-growing employment sectors in the country, creating a high demand for graduates with specialized skills to work for these diverse and exciting organizations.

Students may declare the minor in nonprofit administration at any time during or after the term in which they achieve upper-division standing. Materials for declaring the minor are available in the department office. Courses must be taken for letter grades and passed with grades of C– or better, unless offered pass/no pass only.

PPPM 280Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector4
PPPM 422Grant Proposal Writing1
PPPM 480Nonprofit Management I4
PPPM 481Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations4
PPPM 484Public and Nonprofit Financial Management4
Two upper-division electives 18
Total Credits25
1

List of approved courses available in department office.

Graduate Studies

Programs for the master of community and regional planning (MCRP) degree, the master of nonprofit management (MNM), and the master of public administration (MPA) require two years for completion. The MCRP degree is accredited nationally by the Planning Accreditation Board. The MPA is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. The department also offers a 24-credit graduate certificate in nonprofit management.

The interdisciplinary and eclectic fields of planning, public policy, and public and nonprofit management are concerned with systematically shaping the future. Professionals in these fields frequently lead efforts to plan for change. Most often they are involved in analysis, preparation of recommendations, and implementation of policies and programs that affect public facilities and services and the quality of community life. These professionals assume responsibility for planning, policy, and management in community and regional development, natural resources, economic development, social sciences, land use, transportation, law enforcement, and other fields.

Planning, public policy, and public and nonprofit management graduates have a comprehensive understanding of economic, environmental, fiscal, physical, political, and social characteristics of a community. Graduates are expected to provide leadership and to otherwise participate effectively in efforts to enhance the capacity of communities to deal creatively with change.

Financial Aid

Approximately 40 percent of the department’s students receive some financial assistance (e.g., graduate teaching fellowships, work-study assistance, or research stipends). Graduate teaching fellowships (GTFs) are offered to approximately twenty students each year. Each fellowship includes a stipend and a waiver of tuition and fees for one or more terms. Graduate students also may work on planning and public policy projects through the Community Planning Workshop. Each year five to fifteen students receive stipends for research on contracts developed and administered in the workshop. Research and GTF appointments typically are not offered until the student has been in a PPPM program for at least one term.

Graduate students are eligible for fellowship awards granted by federal agencies and privately endowed foundations and loans from university and federal student loan programs. Information about grants and loans may be obtained from the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships, 1278 University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403-1278.

Applicants to PPPM programs are strongly urged to apply for university financial assistance before February of the year of application in order to be eligible for work-study and other assistance offered by the student financial aid office.

The University of Oregon offers Diversity Excellence Scholarships for graduate students who are United States citizens or permanent residents. For more information, visit the Center for Multicultural Academic Excellence website.

Community and Regional Planning

The master of community and regional planning (MCRP) program trains policy-oriented planners for leadership positions in planning and planning-related organizations. The field of planning is concerned with rational and sensitive guidance of community and regional change. Planners are responsible for identifying and clarifying the nature and effect of planning problems, formulating potential solutions to these problems, and assisting in the implementation of alternative policies.

To realize these objectives, the planner must draw on the skills and insights of many professions and disciplines. The planner must have a basic understanding of the cultural, economic, social, political, and physical characteristics of a community.

Entering students should be prepared to become involved in and committed to resolving important social, economic, environmental, political, and cultural problems. Courses in and outside the department provide students with an integrated understanding of planning, public policy, and public management as well as specific skills needed for a chosen professional area.

Oregon is an especially fruitful laboratory in which to study planning. The state has an international reputation as a source of innovative approaches to addressing planning issues.

Students select a set of courses in consultation with their advisors that focus their elective work on an area of special interest. The program has exceptional strengths in community and regional development, environmental planning, land use and sustainable development, and social planning. In addition, the department’s strengths in nonprofit management, local government management, and budget and finance are of interest to many students in the field of planning.

The program has strong ties with other programs on campus. Students often pursue concurrent degrees in planning and environmental studies, landscape architecture, business, economics, geography, international studies, or public administration. See Concurrent Master’s Degrees in this section.

Preparation

Students are strongly encouraged to complete a thorough social science undergraduate program including courses in economics, sociology, geography, and history. Work experience, particularly if related to planning, is valuable, as are writing and public speaking skills. Courses in the natural sciences, policy sciences, environmental design, or analytic methods are helpful as background for advanced graduate work in a concentration area of interest to the student.

Students must complete either an advanced undergraduate or a graduate-level introductory course in statistics as a pre- or corequisite to Planning Analysis I (PPPM 613). No credit toward the MCRP degree is allowed for the statistics course. The requirement is waived for students with equivalent courses or work experience. Entering students are urged to satisfy this requirement before enrolling in the program.

Students may file petitions to transfer up to 15 graduate credits taken prior to admission to the planning program. Such petitions must be submitted during the first term in the program.

Juniors and seniors who anticipate applying for admission are encouraged to seek advice at the department office.

Careers

Graduates with an MCRP degree find employment in public, private, and nonprofit sectors. In the public sector, three kinds of agencies provide career opportunities: local land-use and zoning agencies; agencies for housing, social services, community renewal, parks, transportation, and other community facilities; and agencies for economic development and natural resource management. In the private sector, graduates are typically employed by consulting planners, private developers, and other firms requiring research and analysis skills. Graduates are also employed by such nonprofit organizations as environmental and advocacy groups, community development organizations, and research firms.

Application Procedures

Importance is placed on the student’s preference for and ability to undertake self-directed educational activity.

Because there are more than sixty-five accredited graduate programs in planning in the United States, the department’s admissions committee emphasizes the selection of candidates who present clear and specific reasons for choosing to pursue their graduate work in planning at the University of Oregon.

Application Materials
  1. Graduate Admission Application, available online—follow the instructions on the department’s website
  2. A résumé
  3. A statement, prepared by the applicant, explaining why admission to the UO planning program is sought and what the applicant’s expectations are from the field
  4. At least three letters of recommendation from people familiar with the applicant’s ability to pursue graduate-level studies in planning
  5. Transcripts from all the colleges and universities attended, including evidence of completion of an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university
  6. Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) scores are optional. If submitted, they are considered along with other application materials
  7. Applicants whose native language is not English must supply results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) examination. The minimum acceptable TOEFL score for admission is 575 (paper-based test) or 88 (Internet-based test); the minimum acceptable IELTS exam score is 7.0. The results of the examination should be sent to the Office of Admissions, 1217 University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1217

Applications are accepted beginning September 15 for admission fall term a year later. The deadline for receipt of the application to the program is February 1. Applicants are notified of admission decisions early in March. For more information, call or write the department.

The Planning Curriculum

A total of 72 credits beyond the bachelor’s degree is required for the MCRP degree. Core courses must be taken for letter grades, unless offered pass/no pass only.

Students are expected to enroll for six terms with an average course load of 12 credits a term. During the summer, students are encouraged to engage in planning work. The planning program offers research stipends and course credit for qualified applicants who take part in research conducted by the Community Planning Workshop. Planning internships are also available; some provide compensation.

Master of Community and Regional Planning Requirements
Core Courses
PPPM 534Urban Geographic Information Systems4
PPPM 542Sustainable Urban Development4
PPPM 611Introduction to Planning Practice4
PPPM 612Legal Issues in Planning4
PPPM 613Planning Analysis I5
PPPM 616Planning Theory and Ethics4
PPPM 617Human Settlements4
PPPM 620Research Methods in Planning I4
PPPM 621Research Methods in Planning II3-4
Experiential Learning
PPPM 625–626Community Planning Workshop10
PPPM 623Professional Development1
Field of Interest
Electives selected from list of suggested courses in consultation with advisor19
Synthesis
PPPM 609Terminal Project4
Total Credits70-71

Community Planning Workshop

A distinctive feature of the planning graduate curriculum is the Community Planning Workshop, an applied research and service program that is required for first-year students. Students work on six month planning projects in small teams supervised by program faculty members and second year graduate students in planning. Clients have included federal, state, county, and local governments as well as nonprofit organizations.

Projects typically focus on issues of immediate environmental, social, and economic importance to the client group and the general public. Recent project topics include

  • Citizen involvement in planning process
  • Housing needs analysis
  • Land-use planning
  • Natural hazards mitigation
  • Program evaluation
  • Strategic plans for communities and regions
  • Tourism and recreational development
  • Watershed planning

Each year, first-year graduate students enrolled in Community Planning Workshop (PPPM 625–626) complete five to ten planning projects. Final written reports, prepared by each student team, provide evidence of the students’ expertise and ability to conduct planning research and to prepare and present high-quality professional reports. After completing Community Planning Workshop (PPPM 625–626), selected students may continue to engage in planning research projects for compensation. The popularity of the program with students—and with a growing number of government and private-sector clients—has enabled the Community Planning Workshop to provide research support for five to fifteen students a year.

Federal grants from the United States Department of Education Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education and support from a variety of state agencies have helped the Community Planning Workshop become one of the most successful community planning assistance programs in the nation. Projects have received numerous state and national awards.

Nonprofit Management

The master of nonprofit management (MNM) is a professional degree designed to train students to lead nonprofit organizations. Due to the growth of the nonprofit sector over the past three decades in the US and the growth of nongovernmental organizations internationally, the sector has professionalized. People currently working in the nonprofit sector and others seeking to switch to or enter the nonprofit sector now seek master’s-level training to advance their careers, specializing specifically in the administration of nonprofit organizations.

Critical skills for nonprofit administration are common to all nonprofit fields, including handling financial management challenges and tax-exempt reporting structures, raising funds from individual donors and institutions, and managing a mission-oriented workforce.

Unique Aspects of the Program

The program melds relevant best-practice elements from the business and government sectors with the management imperatives of the nonprofit and philanthropic sectors. Woven into the course work are opportunities to obtain practical experience at nonprofit organizations, so that participants in the program have significant administrative experience upon graduating. Examples include the review and consultation portion of the Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations (PPPM 581) course, the nine-month board membership required for the Nonprofit Board Governance (PPPM 687) course, and the projects student teams complete for nonprofit organizations in the Nonprofit Consultancy (PPPM 688) course.

Students may combine the master of nonprofit management with another graduate degree from within the department or from other academic units across campus. In most cases, a student is able to obtain two master’s degrees within three years. The normal time to completion for the master of nonprofit management degree is six terms (two years).

Application Procedures

To be eligible for the master of nonprofit management, an applicant must hold a bachelor’s degree. The department strongly encourages applications from people of all backgrounds, and is dedicated to fostering a diverse academic environment.

Applications for admission are due February 1 for students entering the program in the following fall. In exceptional cases, students may be admitted at other times of the year. The online application requires the following (please follow the detailed checklist available on the department website):

  • Official transcripts from undergraduate college or university, and from graduate study, if applicable
  • GRE or GMAT scores
  • TOEFL or IELTS scores for nonnative English speakers
  • A personal statement, two to three pages in length, describing your motivation and preparation for entering or furthering a career in the nonprofit sector, and providing a hypothetical blueprint for the next twenty years of your career
  • Comprehensive employment and education résumé
  • Three recommendation letters, with one or more of the letters by a faculty member
  • University of Oregon online graduate admission application

Nonprofit Curriculum

After completion of the core curriculum (33 credits focusing on financial, management, and revenue-development skills), students complete an internship and 20 credits of concentration electives. Students complete a management-based capstone sequence that culminates in successful completion of a consulting project for a nonprofit organization. The two-year program takes 73 credits to complete.

Master of Nonprofit Management

Core Courses
PPPM 522Grant Proposal Writing1
PPPM 526Strategic Planning for Management4
PPPM 581Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations4
PPPM 586Philanthropy and Grant Making2
PPPM 618Public Sector Theory4
PPPM 623Professional Development1
PPPM 656Quantitative Methods5
PPPM 680Managing Nonprofit Organizations4
PPPM 684Public and Nonprofit Financial Management4
PPPM 687Nonprofit Board Governance (three-term sequence, one credit per term)3
Course to be chosen in consultation with advisor1
Internship
PPPM 604Internship: [Topic]4
Electives
Courses focused on a specific field of interest, synthesizing experience 120
Capstone Course: Management Sequence
PPPM 688Nonprofit Consultancy4
Select three of the following; or other management-relevant course12
Seminar: [Topic] (any experimental management course)
Event Management
Project Management
Collaborative Planning and Management
Public Participation in Diverse Communities
Program Evaluation
Public Management
Total Credits73
1

Courses must be approved by an advisor and should focus on a specific field of interest such as policy, community development planning, environmental sustainability, international development, marketing and development, arts management, public advocacy, and education and social services. More options for course work may be found online, pppm.uoregon.edu/grad/nonprofit-master.

Public Administration

The master of public administration (MPA) is a two-year program for people interested in public service careers that address the critical social, economic, and environmental issues of our time. The curriculum is designed to provide a combination of academic theory, analytic skills, and real-world applications so that students become effective and creative leaders in public service.

A central focus of the program is to prepare students to become evidence-based policymakers, analysts, and managers. Evidence-based policymaking—the idea that the formulation of policy and its implementation should be based on evidence of effectiveness—has gained widespread acceptance in the policy community, both in the United States and abroad, and requires a closer connection between research and practice. It requires that researchers ask policy-relevant questions and conduct meaningful and timely analyses that support the decision-making process; conversely, it requires that policymakers, managers, and leaders think critically about research and integrate appropriate evidence in the implementation and formulation of policy and practice.

Recent graduates work as advisors, policy analysts, and strategic planners in all levels of government, in Oregon, throughout the US, and around the globe. Their work addresses the full range of social issues, from improving health-care access, increasing government efficiency, and responsiveness to creating new governmental structures in developing democracies. Graduates also work in a broad range of nonprofit organizations, for instance, as executive staff members in social service, arts, and environmental organizations.

The State of Oregon is an exciting place to study public administration. As a "laboratory of democracy," it has a long and distinguished record of policy innovation. Most recently, Oregon has been on the forefront of advances in land-use, health-care, and environmental policy.

Unique Aspects of the Program

The size of the program means that master's students at the University of Oregon receive a tremendous amount of individual attention, particularly in the second year when they conduct a team-based policy research project. The close, collegial working relationships between students and instructors means that faculty members are often able to help students attain relevant alumni contacts, internships, and job opportunities.

Since the department also houses a master’s degree program in community and regional planning (MCRP), master of public administration students benefit from additional faculty and planning-related course offerings. In particular, students are invited in their first year to enroll in a two-term, field-based course—Community Planning Workshop (PPPM 625)—in which students consult on a topical issue for a local government or nonprofit agency in Oregon.

Students interested in a career in nonprofits can earn a certificate in nonprofit management concurrently with their master of public administration. The certificate program offers innovative courses including one on board governance, in which students serve on a nonprofit board, and another on philanthropy, in which students award a $15,000 grant to a local agency. As an alternate, students may complete both the MPA and MNM degrees concurrently. See a member of the department staff for application procedures for concurrent programs.

Oregon is known for its progressive policymaking, from the Bottle Bill, to vote-by-mail, to current efforts in health-care reform. Students find policymakers and public managers unusually accessible for consultation in Oregon.

The program prepares participants to become effective, creative leaders in the public and nonprofit sectors. The curriculum provides a combination of substantive knowledge, analytic skills, and professional experience that primes students for careers as evidence-based policymakers, analysts, or managers.

Application Procedures

To be eligible for the graduate program in public administration, an applicant must hold a bachelor’s degree.

Submit the following documents, which must be received by February 1:

  1. Graduate Admission Application, available online—follow the instructions on the department’s website
  2. Comprehensive employment and education résumé
  3. A two-page, typed statement of purpose that clearly describes the applicant’s reasons for pursuing graduate study in the program at Oregon, his or her professional goals and objectives, and professional work experience
  4. Transcripts of grades in courses taken for the bachelor’s degree and of any other college-level work. They should be sent directly by the institution that awarded the course credits
  5. Three letters of recommendation; two may be from academic sources
  6. The Graduate Record Examination is highly recommended for admission
  7. Applicants whose native language is not English must supply results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) examination. The minimum acceptable TOEFL score for admission is 575 (paper-based test) or 88 (Internet-based test); the minimum acceptable IELTS exam score is 7.0. The results of the examination should be sent to the Office of Admissions, 1217 University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1217

Students are selected for the program based on a combination of their undergraduate academic performance, intellectual aptitude, commitment to public service, and written statement. The deadline for receipt of fall term admission is February 1. In exceptional cases, students may be admitted at other times of the year.

The department strongly encourages applications from people of all backgrounds, and is dedicated to fostering a diverse academic environment. This, we believe, will help prepare better future public leaders.

Master of Public Administration Requirements
Core Courses 1
PPPM 618Public Sector Theory4
PPPM 628Public Sector Economics4
PPPM 629Public Budget Administration4
PPPM 633Public Management4
PPPM 636Public Policy Analysis4
PPPM 637MPA Policy Analysis Project1
PPPM 656Quantitative Methods5
PPPM 657Research Methods in Public Policy and Management4
PPPM 684Public and Nonprofit Financial Management4
Field of Interest
Courses in selected field of interest 224
Internship
PPPM 623Professional Development 31
Internships, professional development opportunities 43
Applied Research Project
PPPM 638–639MPA Capstone Applied Research Project I-II10
Total Credits72
1

Must be taken for letter grades.

2

Interest areas may include: policy, public management, nonprofit management, planning, or environmental policy. A list of potential courses for each field of interest is available at the department’s website. Students who would like to develop their own field of interest are able to do so in consultation with a faculty advisor. Recent graduates have created customized fields of interest in food sufficiency, health policy, and international development.

3

Students take course in first year. The course is designed to help students identify their career goals and develop a plan to meet those goals. Students identify summer internship and postgraduation fellowship opportunities, develop polished résumés and cover letters, and conduct informational and mock interviews.

4

Completing an internship is highly recommended for all MPA students, and required for those with less than two years (3 credits) of relevant professional experience. Internships help students to explore and clarify career goals, apply academic learning, enhance and learn new skills, gain experience, and network with professionals. Internships have included those with the Oregon governor’s office, Senator Ron Wyden’s office, the United Nations Internship Programme, the City of Portland Office of Sustainable Development, and Holt International Children’s Services. For more information on the Internship Program, visit pppm.uoregon.edu/internships.

The master of public administration (MPA) program provides students with two key opportunities to synthesize classroom learning and apply their research skills to current policy and management issues. At the start of the second year, students engage in a policy project intended to simulate the real-world environment where analysts and managers are given short time frames to research a topic that they know little or nothing about. Over forty-eight hours, students read relevant policy and research documents, write a memo detailing the evidence base and key issues, and give an oral presentation. The project takes place the week before fall courses begin, and incoming first-year students have the opportunity to view the presentations as part of their orientation to the program. This component of the curriculum is a signature event and rite of passage each fall.

Students also enroll in a two-term project sequence that serves as the synthesizing capstone of the curriculum. Over winter and spring terms of the second year of study, students work on real-world or simulated real-world projects that require conducting in-depth needs assessments, evaluations, cost-benefit analyses, or other applied research. A faculty member works closely with student groups on these projects over the two terms. Past projects have included a survey for a state commission to gauge attitudes among key shareholders on potential policy change, an analysis of administrative data on the impact of a postpolicy implementation on Oregonians, and an examination of three potential communities for a nonprofit’s expansion. 

Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management

The graduate certificate in nonprofit management prepares students for leadership in the nonprofit sector. The focused curriculum develops specific skills that are critical for success in managing nonprofit organizations.

Phenomenal growth in assets and activities of the nonprofit sector over the past two decades have led to career opportunities in the many areas of the nonprofit sector, including cultural and arts organizations, education, health care, human services, international development, and advocacy organizations. Nonprofit enterprise has broadened with developing sources of funding, and the complexities of its management require professional skills specific to the nonprofit sector.

Nonprofit Management Graduate Certificate Requirements

Core Courses
PPPM 522Grant Proposal Writing1
PPPM 581Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations4
PPPM 586Philanthropy and Grant Making2
PPPM 680Managing Nonprofit Organizations4
PPPM 684Public and Nonprofit Financial Management4
Internship and Electives 1
Elective course3
PPPM 604Internship: [Topic] 26
Total Credits24
1

Elective credits may be taken in other departments. Information about the many nonprofit elective courses or waiver of required courses is available from the nonprofit program director.

2

The internship must be with a nonprofit organization or a student may use 6 credits of elective course work that covers material relevant to nonprofits.

Core courses must be taken for letter grades unless offered P/N only.

Admission

Graduate students from any UO department may apply for admission and add the certificate to their degree programs. Students who hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university may apply to complete the certificate as a stand-alone program. Applications are reviewed for admission four times a year. Complete information about admission to the program is available on the nonprofit management certificate section of the department’s website.

Graduate Certificate in Oregon Leadership in Sustainability

The intensive Oregon leadership in sustainability (OLIS) graduate certificate program trains students in the concepts and skills of sustainability and is designed for those who want to prepare for emerging sustainability careers in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Students are immersed in an interdisciplinary learning community with an emphasis on practical experience, integrating issues of climate change, green economy, ecosystem services, green infrastructure, and social justice.

Key Elements

  • One year of full-time study (exceptions on a case-by-case basis)
  • Students take core courses together throughout the year
  • Courses taught by members of the UO faculty on the Eugene campus
  • The content area of the practicums may range from energy and transportation to water, climate action planning, and sustainable real estate development
  • Includes three one-term practicums in which students work with a client organization, integrating skill-based modules on leadership, analysis tools, and implementation

Graduate Certificate in Oregon Leadership in Sustainability Requirements

PPPM 407Seminar: [Topic] (Hazard Mitigation Planning)4
PPPM 607Seminar: [Topic]4
OLIS 607Seminar: [Topic]4
OLIS 608Workshop: [Topic]5
OLIS 611–613Sustainability Leadership Practicum I-III12
OLIS 620Urban Ecological Design4
Two graduate-level elective courses 18
Total Credits41
1

A list of approved courses is available in the department office.

Students may participate in the program as a stand-alone certificate or may choose to pursue the program concurrently with another graduate program. 

Concurrent Master’s Degrees

Students may participate in a concurrent master’s degree program. The fields of planning and of public policy administration and nonprofit management draw on knowledge and expertise from other areas such as business, law, economics, political science, environmental studies, geography, landscape architecture, and architecture. Through the concurrent degree program, students enroll in two master’s programs simultaneously in order to complete requirements for both degrees with three years of course work. Students interested in this option should seek program advice from a member of the faculty. Students must be admitted to both programs and make special arrangements with both program directors.

Community Service Center

The Community Service Center, an interdisciplinary organization, assists Oregon communities by providing planning and technical assistance to help solve local issues, improve the quality of life in rural Oregon, and help make Oregon communities more self-sufficient.

The center incorporates a number of programs, including the following:

Resource Assistance for Rural Environments (RARE)

The Americorps program, RARE, trains graduate-level students, then places them for a year in rural communities, where they help improve economic and environmental conditions. Qualified students receive a monthly stipend and an educational award of $5,550 when they finish their service. Members do not need to be matriculated students. More information about this program is available on the department website.

The Oregon Partnership for Disaster Resilience (OPDR)

The partnership promotes risk reduction and mitigation activities around the state through local plan development support, research and technical resource development, training, and capacity building, offering service-learning opportunities to graduate students in planning, policy, environmental studies, and other university programs. The partnership coordinates three program areas: the Oregon Predisaster Mitigation Program; the Disaster-Resilient University Program, including the UO Integrated Emergency Management Program; and the Long-Term Postdisaster Recovery Planning initiative.

  • Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management (see Graduate tab for information)
  • Graduate Certificate in Oregon Leadership in Sustainability (see Graduate tab for information)

Courses

Course usage information

PPPM 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 201. Introduction to Public Policy. 4 Credits.

Overview of professional public service and the planning and management of public issues. Focuses on the goals of public services within their economic, social, and political contexts.

Course usage information

PPPM 202. Healthy Communities. 4 Credits.

Historical relationships of public policy, planning, and public health; how public policies can promote health; relationship of planning and policies to inequalities in health outcomes.

Course usage information

PPPM 205. Introduction to City Planning. 4 Credits.

Introduction to planning, using urban issues as lenses to explore transportation, housing, environment, and social equity as critical elements shaping where and how people live.

Course usage information

PPPM 280. Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector. 4 Credits.

Overview of the nonprofit sector includes its origin, growth, oversight, and varied elements. Examines theory and research into the effectiveness of nonprofit strategies and structures.

Course usage information

PPPM 325. Community Leadership and Change. 4 Credits.

Explores sustainable change at the community level by examining local systems and institutions: transportation, social influences, environment, housing, and the economy.

Course usage information

PPPM 327. Global Leadership and Change. 4 Credits.

Explores the role of leadership in global social, economic, and ecological sustainability. Considers population, consumption, technology, diversity, scale, nonviolent change, and community.

Course usage information

PPPM 331. Environmental Management. 4 Credits.

Introduction to environmental management. Focuses on solutions to problems in managing population, pollution, and resources.

Course usage information

PPPM 340. Climate-Change Policy. 4 Credits.

Overview of climate-change policy; topics include cap and trade, carbon tax, fuel efficiency standards, biofuel standards, and renewable portfolio standards.

Course usage information

PPPM 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Supervised work experience that offers students opportunities to explore and clarify career goals, apply academic learning, enhance and learn new skills, gain experience, and network with professionals. Repeatable.
Prereq: PPPM 412.

Course usage information

PPPM 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Course usage information

PPPM 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Trial courses are taught under these numbers. See the online class schedule for current titles.

Course usage information

PPPM 412. Internship and Professional Development. 1 Credit.

Introduction to the department’s internship program and career development. Includes overview of professionalism and effective communication, resume and cover letter writing, and interviewing and networking skills.

Course usage information

PPPM 413. Quantitative Methods. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the use of quantitative techniques to answer planning, public policy and management related questions.

Course usage information

PPPM 415. Policy and Planning Analysis. 4 Credits.

Applied problem-solving in the public policy and planning process. Examines the theoretical and methodological underpinnings of policy and planning analysis.
Prereq: EC 201.

Course usage information

PPPM 418. Introduction to Public Law. 4 Credits.

Administrative law, including introduction to legal research, for public administrators. Administrative procedures, implementation of policy through administrative law, judicial review, and practical applications in public agencies.

Course usage information

PPPM 422. Grant Proposal Writing. 1 Credit.

Introduction to the process of preparing grant applications and material for funded research.

Course usage information

PPPM 425. Project Management. 4 Credits.

Application of specific techniques that lead to projects being completed on time, within budget, and with appropriate quality.

Course usage information

PPPM 426. Strategic Planning for Management. 4 Credits.

Process of strategic planning for communities, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations.

Course usage information

PPPM 432. Justice and Urban Revitalization. 4 Credits.

Examines the political, economic, institutional and social forces that affect the long-term vitality of cities and communities and how those factors relate to community redevelopment. Emphasis is given on how to revitalize low-income multicultural communities.

Course usage information

PPPM 434. Urban Geographic Information Systems. 4 Credits.

Introduction to geographic information systems in areas of environmental, demographic, suitability, and transportation-related research.

Course usage information

PPPM 438. Transportation Issues in Planning: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the social implications of various transportation-related policies and practices. Repeatable for a maximum of 8 credits.

Course usage information

PPPM 440. Land-Use Policy. 4 Credits.

Planning in urban, rural, and connecting environments. Functions, distribution, relationships of land uses; social, economic, fiscal, physical consequences of alternative land use development patterns.

Course usage information

PPPM 441. Growth Management. 4 Credits.

Examines motivations for managing growth. Surveys regulatory and incentive-based approaches to growth management at the state, regional, and local level.
Prereq: PPPM 205.

Course usage information

PPPM 442. Sustainable Urban Development. 4 Credits.

Introduces issues revolving around cities as the nexus for environmental challenges, including land-use planning, transportation planning, community and neighborhood design, and green buildings.

Course usage information

PPPM 443. Natural Resource Policy. 4 Credits.

Aspects of population and resource systems. Poses questions about population trends, policy, and optimum size; analyzes methods for determining resource availability and flows.

Course usage information

PPPM 444. Environmental Policy. 4 Credits.

Overview of policies related to the environment: examines the design and effectiveness of specific policies.

Course usage information

PPPM 445. Green Cities. 4 Credits.

Examines the history and future of the interface between urban growth and environmental concerns, and the technological, social, and political forces that continue to shape it.

Course usage information

PPPM 446. Socioeconomic Development Planning. 4 Credits.

Planning for responsible economic and social development. Policy problems and issues in providing a stable economic base and social and economic well-being while avoiding environmental degradation.

Course usage information

PPPM 448. Collaborative Planning and Management. 4 Credits.

Explores theory and practice of collaboration. Presents a variety of collaboration settings with a focus on environmental and natural resource management.

Course usage information

PPPM 452. Public Participation in Diverse Communities. 4 Credits.

Review of community engagement strategies and tools for encouraging public participation in low income and ethnically diverse communities.

Course usage information

PPPM 455. Social Planning and Policy: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics may include health, crime, youth, inequality, international development, or terrorism. Repeatable twice for a total of 12 credits.

Course usage information

PPPM 460. Health Policy. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the key health policy issues of access, cost, quality, and racial and ethnic disparities.

Course usage information

PPPM 465. Program Evaluation. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the design and implementation of program evaluations.

Course usage information

PPPM 480. Nonprofit Management I. 4 Credits.

How to manage nonprofit organizations for superior performance in a humane, responsive, and responsible manner. Distinctive characteristics of nonprofit organizations.
Prereq: PPPM 280.

Course usage information

PPPM 481. Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations. 4 Credits.

Introduction to fundraising for nonprofit organizations. Annual giving, major gifts, planned giving, and campaigns.

Course usage information

PPPM 484. Public and Nonprofit Financial Management. 4 Credits.

Introduction to financial management for public agencies and nonprofit organizations. Topics include budget processes, financial statements, financial resource management (taxes, donations, grants), expenditure systems, and capital project analysis.

Course usage information

PPPM 486. Philanthropy and Grant Making. 2 Credits.

History, economics, and practice of philanthropy and grant making in the United States. Students study philanthropy from a multidisciplinary perspective and finish the quarter by awarding a $15,000 grant to a nonprofit organization of their choice.

Course usage information

PPPM 494. Practice of Leadership and Change. 4 Credits.

Examines the principles and practices of leadership and change in communities and organizations through discussions with community leaders and personal reflection.
Prereq: major status, senior standing preferred.

Course usage information

PPPM 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Trial courses are taught under these numbers. See the online class schedule for current titles.

Course usage information

PPPM 518. Introduction to Public Law. 4 Credits.

Administrative law, including introduction to legal research, for public administrators. Administrative procedures, implementation of policy through administrative law, judicial review, and practical applications in public agencies.

Course usage information

PPPM 522. Grant Proposal Writing. 1 Credit.

Introduction to the process of preparing grant applications and material for funded research.

Course usage information

PPPM 525. Project Management. 4 Credits.

Application of specific techniques that lead to projects being completed on time, within budget, and with appropriate quality.

Course usage information

PPPM 526. Strategic Planning for Management. 4 Credits.

Process of strategic planning for communities, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations.

Course usage information

PPPM 532. Justice and Urban Revitalization. 4 Credits.

Examines the political, economic, institutional and social forces that affect the long-term vitality of cities and communities and how those factors relate to community redevelopment. Emphasis is given on how to revitalize low-income multicultural communities.

Course usage information

PPPM 534. Urban Geographic Information Systems. 4 Credits.

Introduction to geographic information systems in areas of environmental, demographic, suitability, and transportation-related research.

Course usage information

PPPM 538. Transportation Issues in Planning: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the social implications of various transportation-related policies and practices. Repeatable for a maximum of 8 credits.

Course usage information

PPPM 541. Growth Management. 4 Credits.

Examines motivations for managing growth. Surveys regulatory and incentive-based approaches to growth management at the state, regional, and local level.

Course usage information

PPPM 542. Sustainable Urban Development. 4 Credits.

Introduces issues evolving around cities as the nexus for environmental challenges, including land-use planning, transportation planning, community and neighborhood design, and green buildings.

Course usage information

PPPM 543. Natural Resource Policy. 4 Credits.

Aspects of population and resource systems. Poses questions about population trends, policy, and optimum size; analyzes methods for determining resource availability and flows.

Course usage information

PPPM 544. Environmental Policy. 4 Credits.

Overview of policies related to the environment: examines the design and effectiveness of specific policies.

Course usage information

PPPM 546. Socioeconomic Development Planning. 4 Credits.

Planning for responsible economic and social development. Policy problems and issues in providing a stable economic base and social and economic well-being while avoiding environmental degradation.

Course usage information

PPPM 548. Collaborative Planning and Management. 4 Credits.

Explores theory and practice of collaboration. Presents a variety of collaboration settings with a focus on environmental and natural resource management.

Course usage information

PPPM 552. Public Participation in Diverse Communities. 4 Credits.

Review of community engagement strategies and tools for encouraging public participation in low income and ethnically diverse communities.

Course usage information

PPPM 555. Social Planning and Policy: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics may include health, crime, youth, inequality, international development, or terrorism. Repeatable twice for a total of 12 credits.

Course usage information

PPPM 560. Health Policy. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the key health policy issues of access, cost, quality, and racial and ethnic disparities.

Course usage information

PPPM 565. Program Evaluation. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the design and implementation of program evaluations.

Course usage information

PPPM 581. Fundraising for Nonprofit Organizations. 4 Credits.

Introduction to fundraising for nonprofit organizations. Annual giving, major gifts, planned giving, and campaigns.

Course usage information

PPPM 586. Philanthropy and Grant Making. 2 Credits.

History, economics, and practice of philanthropy and grant making in the United States. Students study philanthropy from a multidisciplinary perspective and finish the quarter by awarding a $15,000 grant to a nonprofit organization of their choice.

Course usage information

PPPM 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-10 Credits.

Supervised work experience that offers students opportunities to explore and clarify career goals, apply academic learning, enhance and learn new skills, gain experience, and network with professionals. Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 606. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable. A recent topic is Community Planning.

Course usage information

PPPM 609. Terminal Project. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PPPM 611. Introduction to Planning Practice. 4 Credits.

Explores the concepts and functions of the planning process as they relate to the social, economic, political, and environmental aspects of communities and regions.

Course usage information

PPPM 612. Legal Issues in Planning. 4 Credits.

Federal and state legal relationships, the role of the courts in reviewing public sector decision-making, sources of the law, issues in land-use regulation, and basic legal research skills.

Course usage information

PPPM 613. Planning Analysis I. 5 Credits.

Data sources and methods of data collection including surveys; descriptive and multivariate analysis; computer applications; selected analytic models, population projections, cost-benefit analysis.

Course usage information

PPPM 614. Planning Analysis II. 5 Credits.

Applications of geographic information system technology. Sequence with PPPM 613.

Course usage information

PPPM 616. Planning Theory and Ethics. 4 Credits.

Logic of the planning process; the relationship of planning to the political process and to rational decision making in governance.

Course usage information

PPPM 617. Human Settlements. 4 Credits.

Historical development of cities and the ways in which city and regional contexts influence economic, social, and political processes.

Course usage information

PPPM 618. Public Sector Theory. 4 Credits.

Overview of the core concepts, theories, and practices that provide the foundation for the field of public policy and management.

Course usage information

PPPM 620. Research Methods in Planning I. 4 Credits.

Communicate, execute, and evaluate research in the public sector. Students conduct original research projects from problem formulation through data analysis.

Course usage information

PPPM 621. Research Methods in Planning II. 3-4 Credits.

Students explore research topics and develop proposals for terminal project. Sequence with PPPM 620.

Course usage information

PPPM 623. Professional Development. 1 Credit.

Articulating preliminary career goals and mapping the necessary steps to accomplish these goals.

Course usage information

PPPM 625. Community Planning Workshop. 5 Credits.

First in a two-term sequence of planning and problem-solving courses. Students working in teams conduct research and develop solutions to planning problems for a client community. Sequence with PPPM 626.

Course usage information

PPPM 626. Community Planning Workshop. 5 Credits.

Last in a two-term sequence of planning and problem-solving courses. Students working in teams conduct research and develop solutions to planning problems for a client community. Sequence with PPPM 625.
Prereq: PPPM 625.

Course usage information

PPPM 628. Public Sector Economics. 4 Credits.

Reasons for governmental intervention and analysis of revenue sources available to governments. Includes discussion of various taxes, intergovernmental transfer policies, and user fees.

Course usage information

PPPM 629. Public Budget Administration. 4 Credits.

Resource allocation through the budget process. Analysis of budget systems, service costing, and citizen participation in the budget process.

Course usage information

PPPM 633. Public Management. 4 Credits.

Theory and practice of public service managment; leadership and organizational capacity building, including key management activities for developing effective public service organizations.

Course usage information

PPPM 636. Public Policy Analysis. 4 Credits.

Techniques in the policymaking process. Determining the impact of policies, comparing alternatives, determining the likelihood that a policy will be adopted and effectively implemented.
Prereq: PPPM 628 or equivalent.

Course usage information

PPPM 637. MPA Policy Analysis Project. 1 Credit.

Students team to produce a professionally oriented policy analysis memorandum and presentation on an assigned topic in a 48-hour period.
Prereq: PPPM 636.

Course usage information

PPPM 638. MPA Capstone Applied Research Project I. 5 Credits.

Team prepare applied research projects for client organizations using analytical and managerial skills to solve problems in public policy analysis or public management. Sequence with PPPM 639.
Prereq: PPPM 618, 629, 633, 636, 657, 684.

Course usage information

PPPM 639. MPA Capstone Applied Research Project II. 5 Credits.

Teams prepare applied research projects for client organizations using analytical and management skills to solve problems in public policy analysis or public management. Sequence with PPPM 638.
Prereq: PPPM 638.

Course usage information

PPPM 645. Sustainable Cities. 4 Credits.

Examines the nexus of sustainability and planning in theory and practice. Explores how cities incorporate principles of sustainability in various systems and policies.

Course usage information

PPPM 656. Quantitative Methods. 5 Credits.

Develops skills in quantitative analysis. Emphasizes selecting appropriate analysis procedures and properly interpreting and reporting results.

Course usage information

PPPM 657. Research Methods in Public Policy and Management. 4 Credits.

Survey of research methods used in the analysis of public policy issues. Emphasis is on determining the appropriate methodology for a given research question.
Prereq: PPPM 656.

Course usage information

PPPM 680. Managing Nonprofit Organizations. 4 Credits.

Principles of effective management of nonprofit organizations. Governance, strategy, legal structure and standards, and volunteer administration.

Course usage information

PPPM 684. Public and Nonprofit Financial Management. 4 Credits.

Financial management overview for public agencies and nonprofits, including budget processes, financial statements, resource management, expenditure systems, capital project analysis, and internal management control processes.

Course usage information

PPPM 687. Nonprofit Board Governance. 1 Credit.

Students serve on governing boards of nonprofit organizations for one year: fall, winter, and spring terms.

Course usage information

PPPM 688. Nonprofit Consultancy. 4 Credits.

Student teams complete projects for nonprofit organizations, assessing organizational needs and capacity, evaluating alternative strategies, and recommending solutions for organizational success.

Course usage information

PPPM 690. Student Research Colloquium. 1-3 Credits.

Presentation by advanced master's degree candidates of designs and conclusions resulting from thesis research projects. Repeatable for maximum of 3 credits.