Cinema Studies

http://cinema.uoregon.edu

Michael G. Aronson, Program Director
541-346-8104
541-346-8144 fax
201 McKenzie Hall
6223 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-6223
cinema@uoregon.edu

The cinema studies major blends a film- and media-focused liberal arts education with creative work in digital filmmaking. Because cinema is inherently multidisciplinary, the major spans the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Architecture and Allied Arts, and the School of Journalism and Communication, and includes a diverse array of courses in the history, theory, and aesthetics of cinema as well as in digital production. This collaboration is unique to Oregon: cinema studies majors take their courses across three different schools rather than from one department or program within one school, learning to understand the medium from a variety of disciplinary angles and perspectives.

The bachelor of arts in cinema studies provides its graduates with a sound foundation for entering their chosen professions or continuing their education in graduate school. It also gives them the critical and analytic skills to adapt to the changes that are likely to occur in their professions throughout their lifetimes.

Students in the major are encouraged to study overseas in programs that immerse them in different cultures and languages, including the program's own summer program in Dublin, Ireland, at the National Film School of Ireland, housed in the Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design, and Technology. Students are also encouraged to work with the program's staff to seek internships in their chosen areas of potential career interest and expertise.

Faculty

Michael G. Aronson, associate professor; director, Cinema Studies Program. See English.

Masami Kawai, instructor (cinema). BA, 2003, Hampshire College; MFA, 2013, California, Los Angeles. (2014)

Priscilla P. Ovalle, associate professor; associate director, Cinema Studies Program. See English.

Shauna Riedel-Bash, instructor (cinema); assistant director, student services. BA, 2004, Occidental College; MS, 2008, Stanford. (2012)

Sergio Rigoletto, associate professor (cinema, Italian). Laurea, 2002, Catania; MA, 2004, Birkbeck, London; PhD, 2010, Reading. (2012)

Andre Sirois, instructor (cinema); multimedia supervisor. BA, 2002, Central Connecticut State; MA, 2005, Maine; PhD, 2011, Oregon. (2012)

Daniel Gomez Steinhart, assistant professor (cinema; journalism). BA, 2000, Wesleyan; MA, 2006, PhD, 2013, California, Los Angeles. (2014)

Participating Faculty

Michael Allan, comparative literature

Peter Alilunas, journalism and communication

Michael Bray, art

Keith Eggener, history of art and architecture

Sangita Gopal, English

Dong Hoon Kim, East Asian languages and literatures

Lesli A. Larson, library

Gabriela Martinez, journalism and communication

Daniel L. Miller, journalism and communication

Biswarup "Bish" Sen, journalism and communication

Janet Wasko, journalism and communication

Affiliated Faculty

Kenneth S. Calhoon, comparative literature

Amanda E. Doxtater, German and Scandinavian

Kate Mondloch, history of art and architecture

Elizabeth M. Peterson, library

Stephen Rust, English

Rick Silva, art

Undergraduate Studies

The bachelor of arts in cinema studies consists of 56 credits divided among four categories: fundamentals, production, core courses, and electives. The major includes the option of graduating with honors. A bachelor of science degree is not offered.

Courses in the major must be taken for a letter grade, and students must earn a grade of mid-C or better for credit toward the major. At least 28 credits must be taken in residence at the University of Oregon.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Fundamentals Courses 1
J 201Media and Society4
ENG 260Media Aesthetics4
Select two of the following:8
History of the Motion Picture
History of the Motion Picture
History of the Motion Picture
Production Courses
Select one of the following Production A courses: 24
Introduction to Documentary Production
Introduction to Production
Introduction to Narrative Cinema Production
For a list of courses that satisfy Production B requirements (one is required), review the term course lists at cinema.uoregon.edu/term-course-lists.4
Core Courses 3
For a list of courses that satisfy core requirements, review the course lists at cinema.uoregon.edu/term-course-lists. A total of six core courses, at least one from each category, is required.24
Electives 4
For a list of courses that satisfy elective requirements, review the course lists at cinema.uoregon.edu/term-course-lists. Two electives are required and may include additional production and core courses.8
Total Credits56
 
1

Fundamentals courses (16 credits) introduce majors to three central approaches to cinema studies: historical, social-institutional, and aesthetic. These must be completed before entry into production courses.

  • Students must complete Media and Society (J 201), Media Aesthetics (ENG 260), and two of the three courses in the history sequence [History of the Motion Picture (ENG 265), History of the Motion Picture (ENG 266), History of the Motion Picture (ENG 267)], which may be taken in any order. Completion of all fundamentals courses is required before taking any production courses.
2

Production courses (8 credits: 4 from Production A and 4 from Production B) give all majors a chance to learn the essentials of media production.

  • After completing the fundamentals requirements, students may enroll in a Production A course [Introduction to Production (ARTD 256), Introduction to Narrative Cinema Production (CINE 270), or Introduction to Documentary Production (J 208)].
  • After successful completion of a Production A course, students are eligible to register for Production B courses (various topics in production; please see term course list for offerings).
3

Core courses (24 credits) strengthen students’ understanding of cinema as a dynamic, multicultural, and transnational phenomenon. Please see term course list for offerings.

  • Students must complete six core courses, with at least one from each subcategory: Core A (institutions); Core B (theory and criticism); and Core C (national, regional, and transnational cinema).
  • For students who declared the cinema studies major in fall 2013 or later: two courses in the core with the CINE subject code (8 credits out of the required 24) are required.
4

Electives (8 credits) allow students to broaden their exposure to cinema and media studies. These courses are not focused exclusively on cinema but instead study it in relation to other modes of inquiry, including (but not limited to) Asian studies, comparative literature, ethnic studies, folklore, philosophy, journalism, literary studies, music, Romance languages, and women's and gender studies).

  • A wide variety of elective courses from a range of departments and programs are available. Additional fundamentals, production, and core courses may also count as elective courses.

Honors

Students receive program honors at graduation if they have a final cumulative GPA of at least 3.75 in cinema studies course work.

Please contact Shauna Riedel-Bash, assistant director of student services, with any questions: cineadvising@uoregon.edu.

Certificate in Film Studies

The certificate in film studies requires 36 credits in courses chosen from four groups:

  1. Introduction to film studies
  2. Aesthetics, theory, and methods of film studies
  3. Film and society
  4. Electives
Introduction to Film Studies
ENG 265–266
ENG 260
History of the Motion Picture
and Media Aesthetics
12
Aesthetics, Theory, and Methods of Film Studies 1
At least one course from English, music, journalism and communication, or other schools or departments on media production and industries, film history, music, genres, and other topics emphasizing the aesthetic aspects of film. Visit the Cinema Studies Program online term lists for the most effective options, especially core A and core B courses.8
Film and Society 1
At least two courses from foreign-language departments, English, the social sciences, journalism and communication, or other departments and schools on national cinemas—China, France, Germany, Russia, or other nations—and other topics emphasizing the social aspects of film. Visit the Cinema Studies Program online term lists for the most effective options, especially core C courses.8
Electives 1
At least two electives in film studies area 28
Total Credits36
1

As many as four credits in independent study may fulfill requirement.

2

Selected in consultation with advisor, these courses can be in a related field, such as theater arts, or another film course. Visit the Cinema Studies Program online term lists for the most effective options, especially elective classes.

Students must earn a grade of mid-C or better in required courses, including independent studies.

Courses

Course usage information

CINE 230. Remix Cultures. 4 Credits.

Study of issues surrounding media production and consumption in relation to intellectual property laws in modern society. Open to all majors.

Course usage information

CINE 270. Introduction to Narrative Cinema Production. 4 Credits.

Focuses on basic theory and practice of digital video for narrative production.
Prereq: ENG 260, J 201; two from ENG 265, 266, 267.

Course usage information

CINE 320. Beginning Screenwriting. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the basics of writing for the screen. Provides students with an organized strategy for writing a feature film.
Prereq: ENG 260, J 201; two from ENG 265, 266, 267; one from ARTD 256, CINE 270, J 208.

Course usage information

CINE 330. Film Festivals. 4 Credits.

Surveys histories of film festivals in relation to their forms, functions, operations, marketing, curatorial missions, and social impacts.
Prereq: one from J 201, ENG 260, ENG 265, ENG 266, ENG 267.

Course usage information

CINE 350. Gender and Sexuality in European Cinema. 4 Credits.

Examines questions of gender and sexuality within the transnational and national contexts of Europe, including its diverse cinematic landscapes, traditions, and star imagery.

Course usage information

CINE 360. Film Theory. 4 Credits.

Introduction to theoretical debates about film as a medium of artistic expression in a transhistorical and global framework.

Course usage information

CINE 365. Digital Cinema. 4 Credits.

Examines the impact of digital media technologies on diverse dimensions of cinematic experience encompassing the production, delivery, and reception.

Course usage information

CINE 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable when the topic changes.

Course usage information

CINE 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CINE 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits; only 4 credits may count toward the cinema studies major.

Course usage information

CINE 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits; only 4 credits may count toward the cinema studies major.

Course usage information

CINE 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CINE 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: One course from ARTD 252, ARTD 256, CINE 270, J 207, J 208.

Course usage information

CINE 410. Experimental Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: one from ENG 110, 260.

Course usage information

CINE 420. Advanced Screenwriting. 4 Credits.

Provides advanced screenwriting students with an organized strategy for writing a feature film screenplay. Sequence with CINE 320.
Prereq: CINE 320 with grade of B– or better.

Course usage information

CINE 425. Cinema Production: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Exploration of intermediate to advanced techniques used in cinema production—from music videos to digital sound recording to 16-millimeter film. Topics include Directing, Digital Single-Lens Reflex Camera Production, Music Video Production. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits when topic changes.
Prereq: ENG 260, J 201; two from ENG 265, 266, 267; one from ARTD 256, CINE 270, J 208.

Course usage information

CINE 470. Postwar Cinema : [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Examines how war has impacted film cultures across the globe and the relation between film industries and war. Develops analytical skills within an historical and national context. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits when the topic changes.

Course usage information

CINE 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CINE 510. Experimental Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CINE 520. Advanced Screenwriting. 4 Credits.

Provides advanced screenwriting students with an organized strategy for writing a feature film screenplay.