English

http://english.uoregon.edu

David J. Vazquez, Department Head
541-346-1516
541-346-1509 fax
118 Prince Lucien Campbell Hall
1286 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-1286

With nearly 50 full-time faculty members, the Department of English offers students a broad foundation in traditional British, American, and Anglophone literary studies, as well as intensive course work in interdisciplinary studies, emerging media, and current critical methodologies. Its lower-division courses provide training in writing and introduce the student to literature as a humanistic discipline. Its upper-division courses emphasize the humanistic values that emerge from studying literature and allied disciplines analytically and in depth.

Careers

The study of English opens doors to many careers. All fields of endeavor place high value on the ability to read intelligently and to write clearly. The English major may lead most directly to careers in education, journalism, or communications; it is also highly regarded as undergraduate training for law, government, social work, community service, and business. Indeed, the ability to handle the language with clarity and cogency is the skill most frequently cited by business professionals as desirable. A major in English, with judiciously selected electives, prepares students not only to find that essential first job but also to possess the breadth of outlook and depth of perspective that become increasingly important in subsequent phases of their careers. A student preparing for graduate study in English should construct an appropriate course of undergraduate study in consultation with a faculty advisor.

Expository Writing

The English department offers required and elective courses in expository writing for all university students to help them improve their ability to write clearly and effectively. Students must fulfill the university writing requirement of two composition courses or be cleared according to established waiver and exemption policies. The requirement is College Composition I (WR 121) and either College Composition II (WR 122) or College Composition III (WR 123), or their approved equivalents. Students should complete the writing requirement—with course work, by exemption, or by waiver examination—early in their studies.

Exemptions

Scores of 37 or better on the new College Board SAT Reading and Writing tests waive the need to take College Composition I (WR 121). No credit is given for this waiver. A score of 710 or better on the old SAT Critical Reading test (650 prior to 1995) or 32 or better on the ACT English test will also waive WR 121 (without credit). A score of 3, 4, or 5 on the Advanced Placement (AP) Language and Composition Examination produces credit for WR 121.

Waiver Examinations

Waiver examinations for College Composition I (WR 121) and College Composition II (WR 122) are offered during the first week of classes, fall through spring terms, at the UO Testing Office, 238 University Health, Counseling, and Testing Center Building; call 541-346-3230. Visit the Testing Office website to sign up for an examination. No credit is awarded for waiver examinations, and students may not take waiver examinations for both courses in the same term. The essay exams are graded pass/no pass by three members of the Department of English composition committee. Students who do not pass may not retake the examination and should register for the appropriate writing course as soon as possible. Students who pass the exam have an "exemption by exam" notation for either College Composition I (WR 121) or College Composition II (WR 122) placed on their degree audit. Waiver exams are not returned to students, nor are they used as a teaching device. Additional help and special tutoring are available to students through the University Teaching and Learning Center.

Placement

Students for whom English is the native language are placed in their first writing course based on their SAT or ACT verbal scores. Students whose scores fall below 26 on the new SAT Reading and Writing tests, below 480 on the old SAT Verbal, or below 19 on the ACT are eligible for concurrent enrollment in Writing Tutorial (WR 195) WR 195) with College Composition I (WR 121)

Nonnative Speakers

Students for whom English is not the native or primary language are placed in their first writing course on the basis of a placement test. These may include Introductory Academic Writing (AEIS 110), Intermediate Academic Writing (AEIS 111), and Advanced Academic Writing (AEIS 112) (taught in the Department of Linguistics). Placement tests are administered before registration. Nonnative speakers should inquire at the American English Institute, 107 Pacific Hall, for placement test dates.

Transfer Students

Transfer students in doubt about the equivalency of courses taken elsewhere should bring transcripts and catalog descriptions to the composition office, Department of English, for evaluation.

Faculty

Michael G. Aronson, associate professor (film studies). BA, 1994, Pennsylvania; MA, 1997, PhD, 2002, Pittsburgh. (2003)

Martha J. Bayless, professor (medieval literature). BA, 1980, Bryn Mawr; MA, 1984, PhD, 1990, Cambridge. (1989)

Carolyn Bergquist, senior lecturer (Renaissance literature; rhetoric and composition); director, Composition Program. BA, 1994, California State, Stanislaus; MA, 1996, PhD, 2003, Oregon. (2003)

Elizabeth A. Bohls, professor (18th-century literature). BA, 1979, Mount Holyoke College; PhD, 1989, Stanford. (1998)

Tina Boscha, senior instructor (composition). BA, 1995, Calvin College; MFA, 2003, Oregon. (2003)

Lara Bovilsky, associate professor (Renaissance literature and culture; graduate professionalism). BA, 1995, Brown; MA, 1998, PhD, 2001, Duke. (2008)

Kirby Brown, assistant professor (Native and ethnic American literatures). BA, 1997, Texas, Austin; MA, 2005, Texas, San Antonio. (2011)

Kristy Bryant-Berg, instructor (composition). BA, 2002, Colorado, Boulder; MA, 2004, Oregon; PhD, 2009, Oregon. (2014)

Stephanie Clark, associate professor (medieval literature). BA, 2002, Texas, Dallas; MA, 2004, PhD, 2011, Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. (2011)

Michael Copperman, senior instructor (composition). BA, 2002, Stanford; MFA, 2006, Oregon. (2006)

James R. Crosswhite, professor (rhetoric, writing, critical theory). BA, 1975, California, Santa Cruz; MA, 1979, PhD, 1987, California, San Diego. (1989)

Dianne M. Dugaw, professor (17th- and 18th-century literature, British and American folklore). BA, 1971, Portland; MA, 1976, PhD, 1982, California, Los Angeles. (1990)

Tara S. Fickle, assistant professor (Asian American literature, multiethnic literature). BA, 2006, Wesleyan; MA, 2010, PhD 2014, California. Los Angeles. (2014)

William Fogarty, instructor (composition). BA, 1995, State University of New York, New Paltz; MFA, 1998, City University of New York, Brooklyn College; MPhil, 2000, Dublin, Trinity College; PhD, 2015, Oregon. (2016)

Karen J. Ford, professor (poetry and poetics, modern poetry, American literature). BA, 1978, California State, Sacramento; MA, 1981, California, Davis; PhD, 1989, Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. (1992)

Lisa Freinkel, associate professor (Renaissance literature, contemplative studies). BA, 1987, Harvard; MA, 1989, PhD, 1993, California, Berkeley. (1995)

John T. Gage, professor (rhetoric, writing, modern poetry). BA, 1969, MA, 1971, PhD, 1976, California, Berkeley. (1980)

Brian Gazaille, instructor (composition). BA, 2009, Arizona; PhD, 2016, Oregon. (2016)

Miriam Gershow, senior instructor (composition); associate director, composition. BS, 1992, Michigan, Ann Arbor; MFA, 2002, Oregon. (2004)

Lisa M. Gilman, professor (folklore). BA, 1993, Oregon; MA, 1996, PhD, 2001, Indiana. (2005)

Warren Ginsberg, Philip H. Knight Professor (medieval literature). MA, 1971, State University of New York, Stony Brook; PhD, 1975, Yale. (2000) 

Sangita Gopal, associate professor (postcolonial literature and film). BA, 1990, Calcutta; MA, 1995, PhD, 2000, Rochester. (2004)

Kathleen Horton, senior instructor (Renaissance, composition). BA, 1989, Saint Martin's; MA, 1991, PhD, 1995, Oregon. (2005)

Heidi N. Kaufman, Sherl K. Coleman and Margaret E. Guitteau Teaching Professor in the Humanities; associate professor (19th-century British literature); associate department head. BA, 1991, Drew; MA, 1994, Boston; PhD, 2011, New Hampshire. (2013)

C. Anne Laskaya, associate professor (medieval literature, women writers, rhetoric). BA, 1976, Lawrence; BMus, Lawrence Conservatory of Music; MA, 1978, PhD, 1989, Rochester. (1983)

Stephanie LeMenager, Barbara and Carlisle Moore Distinguished Professor in English and American Literature (environmental literature). BA, 1991, Stanford; MA, 1994, PhD, 1999, Harvard. (2013)

David Leiwei Li, President’s Distinguished Professor in the Humanities (Asian American literature and culture). BA, 1982, Shanghai Foreign Languages Institute; MA, 1986, Indiana University of Pennsylvania; PhD, 1991, Texas, Austin. (1999)

Sharon Luk, assistant professor (Asian American literature). BA, 2001, Brown; MA, 2008, PhD, 2012, Southern California. (2014)

Quinn Miller, assistant professor (film and media studies). BA, 2003, Chicago; MA, 2005, PhD, 2010, Northwestern. (2012)

Kate Myers, instructor (composition). BA, 2002, Goshen College; MA, 2006, North Florida; PhD, 2016, Oregon. (2016)

Kathleen O’Fallon, senior instructor (Victorian literature, early 20th-century literature, film); assistant department head. BS, 1972, MS, 1980, Kansas State; MA, 1984, PhD, 1998, Oregon. (1999)

Brendan O’Kelly, instructor (composition). BA, 2002, MA, 2004, Colorado, Boulder; PhD, 2016, California, Los Angeles. (2015)

Priscilla P. Ovalle, associate professor (film, Latino cinema). BS, 1998, Emerson College; MA, 2001, California, Los Angeles; PhD, 2006, Southern California. (2006) 

Paul W. Peppis, professor (modern British literature); director, Oregon Humanities Center. BA, 1984, Williams; MA, 1987, PhD, 1993, Chicago. (1995)

Forest Pyle, professor (romanticism, literary theory). BA, 1980, MA, 1983, PhD, 1988, Texas, Austin. (1988)

Mark Quigley, associate professor (Irish literature, 20th-century literature). BA, 1992, Stanford; MA, 1997, PhD, 2003, California, Los Angeles. (2006)

Nick Recktenwald, instructor (composition). BA, 2008, North Carolina, Asheville; MA, 2014, Oregon.(2016)

William Rossi, professor (19th-century American literature); director of undergraduate studies. BA, 1972, MA, 1979, Missouri; PhD, 1986, Minnesota. (1989)

George Rowe, professor (Renaissance literature); editor, Comparative Literature. BA, 1969, Brandeis; MA, 1971, PhD, 1973, Johns Hopkins. (1985)

Stephen Rust, instructor (composition). BS, 1999, Idaho State; MA, 2006, Oregon State; PhD, 2011, Oregon. (2015)

Benjamin D. Saunders, professor (Renaissance literature, comics studies). BA, 1991, East Anglia; MPhil, 1992, Cambridge; PhD, 2000, Duke. (2000)

Gordon M. Sayre, professor (early American literature, 18th-century literature, folklore). BA, 1988, Brown; PhD, 1993, State University of New York, Buffalo. (1993)

Steven Shankman, professor (18th-century literature, the classical tradition, comparative literature). BA, 1969, Texas, Austin; BA, 1971, MA, 1976, Cambridge; PhD, 1977, Stanford. (1984)

Emily Simnitt, instructor (composition). BA, 1995, Brigham Young; MA, 2005, Idaho State. (2015)

Alison Lau Stephens, instructor (composition). BA, 2006, Queen’s University at Kingston (Ontario); BEd, 2007, Toronto; MA, 2013, Oregon. (2014)

Courtney Thorsson, associate professor (African American literature, 19th- and 20th-century American literature, food studies). BA, 2000, Virginia; MA, 2004, MPhil, 2006, PhD, 2009, Columbia. (2009)

Avinnash Tiwari, instructor (composition). BA, 2010, Pennsylvania; MA, 2013, Oregon. (2016)

Corbett Upton, instructor (Central American poetry); associate director, undergraduate studies. BA, 2001, Arizona State; MA, 2006, PhD, 2010, Oregon. (2010)

David J. Vazquez, associate professor (Latino literature, 20th-century literature, ethnic studies). BA, 1988, South Florida; MA, 1998, PhD, 2004, California, Santa Barbara. (2003)

Mark Whalan, professor (modern and 20th-century literature); Robert D. and Eve D. Horn Chair in English and American Literature. BA, 1995, Warwick; MA, 1996, Durham; PhD, 2002, Exeter. (2011)

Elizabeth A. Wheeler, associate professor (post-1945 literature, cultural studies, disability studies). BA, 1982, Bowdoin; MA, 1988, City University of New York; PhD, 1996, California, Berkeley. (1996)

Jenée Wilde, instructor (composition). BA, 1994, Boise State; MFA, 2003, Goddard College; PhD, 2015, Oregon (2016)

Daniel N. Wojcik, professor (folklore, popular culture). BA, 1978, California, Santa Barbara; MA, 1986, PhD, 1992, California, Los Angeles. (1991)

Henry B. Wonham, professor (19th- and 20th-century American literature). BA, 1983, Princeton; PhD, 1991, Virginia. (1995)

Mary E. Wood, professor (19th-century American literature, gender studies). BA, 1978, Yale; MA, 1980, PhD, 1987, Stanford. (1987)

Emeriti

James L. Boren, professor emeritus. BA, 1965, San Francisco State; MA, 1967, PhD, 1970, Iowa. (1970)

William Cadbury, professor emeritus. BA, 1956, Harvard; MS, 1957, PhD, 1961, Wisconsin, Madison. (1961)

Suzanne Clark, professor emerita. BA, 1961, MA, 1965, Oregon; PhD, 1980, California, Irvine. (1990)

James W. Earl, professor emeritus. BA, 1967, Bucknell; PhD, 1971, Cornell. (1987)

Marilyn Farwell, professor emerita. BA, 1963, MacMurray; MA, 1966, PhD, 1971, Illinois. (1971)

Thelma Greenfield, professor emerita. BA, 1944, MA, 1947, Oregon; PhD, 1952, Wisconsin, Madison. (1963)

Robert Grudin, professor emeritus. BA, 1960, Harvard; MA, 1963, PhD, 1969, California, Berkeley. (1971)

Joseph A. Hynes Jr., professor emeritus. AB, 1951, Detroit; AM, 1952, PhD, 1961, Michigan. (1957)

Ruth F. Jackson, senior instructor emerita. BA, 1929, MA, 1933, Oregon. (1955)

Kathleen Rowe Karlyn, professor emerita. BA, 1969, Connecticut; MLA, 1973, Johns Hopkins; PhD, 1992, Oregon. (1994)

Linda Kintz, professor emerita. BA, 1967, Texas Tech; MA, 1969, Southern Methodist; PhD, 1982, Oregon. (1988)

Julia Lesage, professor emerita. MA, 1962, PhD, 1972, Indiana. (1988)

Glen A. Love, professor emeritus. BA, 1954, MA, 1959, PhD, 1964, Washington (Seattle). (1965)

William Rockett, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1961, MA, 1963, Oklahoma; PhD, 1969, Wisconsin, Madison. (1966)

Ralph J. Salisbury, professor emeritus. BA, 1949, MFA, 1951, Iowa. (1961)

Sharon R. Sherman, professor emerita. PhB, 1965, Wayne State; MA, 1971, California, Los Angeles; PhD, 1978, Indiana. (1976)

Richard L. Stein, professor emeritus. BA, 1965, Amherst; AM, 1966, PhD, 1970, California, Berkeley. (1976)

Richard C. Stevenson, professor emeritus. AB, 1961, AM, 1963, PhD, 1969, Harvard. (1968)

Nathaniel Teich, professor emeritus. BS, 1960, Carnegie-Mellon; MA, 1962, Columbia; PhD, 1970, California, Riverside. (1969)

Louise Westling, professor emerita. BA, 1964, Randolph-Macon Woman’s; MA, 1965, Iowa; PhD, 1974, Oregon. (1985)

George Wickes, professor emeritus. BA, 1944, Toronto; MA, 1949, Columbia; PhD, 1954, California, Berkeley. (1970)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Participating

David A. Frank, honors college

Michael Hames-García, ethnic studies

Undergraduate Studies

The Department of English expects its majors to acquire knowledge of English and American literature. In addition, it expects them to gain a sense of history and a reading knowledge of at least one second language. Majors should construct their programs in consultation with an advisor. The major requirements for the degree of bachelor of arts (BA) in the Department of English are listed below.

Course work required for the English major, both lower division and upper division, must be passed with grades of mid-C or better. Majors must complete the university second-language requirement for the BA degree. At least 28 of the required 36 upper-division credits must be taken at the University of Oregon.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Lower-Division Courses16
Genre: [Topic] (two courses with differing topics)
Two lower-division elective courses 1
Foundation Courses 212
Foundations of the English Major: Context
Foundations of the English Major: Theory
Foundations of the English Major: Text
Writing Requirement 34
Upper-Division Courses 432
Literature course, pre-1500
Literature course, 1500–1789
Literature course, 1789 to the present
Literary theory or rhetoric course
Media, folklore, or culture course
Gender, ability, queer studies, or sexuality course
Empire, race, or ethnicity course
Additional upper-division course work in literature, media, folklore, or writing 5
Total Credits64
1

May include only one of the following:  Introduction to Literature: Fiction (ENG 104)Introduction to Literature: Drama (ENG 105)Introduction to Literature: Poetry (ENG 106), and may include no courses with a WR subject code.

2

Completion of at least one Genre: [Topic] (ENG 205) topics course is a prerequisite for enrolling in ENG 301 or 302; completion of either ENG 301 or 302 is prerequisite for enrolling in ENG 303.

3

May be fulfilled using (a) an upper-division elective, (b) The Art of the Sentence (ENG 420), or (c) any upper-division WR course.

4

One course may satisfy a maximum of two upper-division area requirements at once, as indicated on the current advising supplement. 

5

No more than 8 credits of Research: [Topic] (ENG 401), Thesis (ENG 403), Reading and Conference: [Topic] (ENG 405), or Writing and Conference: [Topic] (CRWR 405). Upper-division CRWR courses may also be used to fulfill this requirement.

Honors Program in English

The program provides qualified undergraduate majors with special options for fulfilling departmental requirements. Honors students interested in the intensive study of literature in small discussion seminars independently explore a special topic of their own choosing, under the guidance of a faculty member. Typically, students spend a major portion of the senior year writing their honors thesis.

Requirements

  1. Completion of all English department requirements
  2. Minimum of two terms of Seminar: [Topic] (ENG 407) (Capstone).
  3. Two terms of Thesis (ENG 403), a directed program of study or creative writing under the guidance of an appropriate advisor.
  4. Senior thesis—either a critical essay of thirty-five to fifty pages or a substantial piece of creative writing. The thesis must by approved by the advisor and a second reader (typically both faculty members in English) after an oral defense.

Admission and Supervision

Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.70 in their English courses and completed at least two upper-division English courses and, if possible, all lower-division major requirements. Admission is based on the applicant's academic record, a brief description of the applicant's proposed project, and the recommendation of two faculty members in the department.

Beginning with the 2014–15 academic year, Clark Honors College English majors who have been accepted into the English honors program and who complete the requirements for both the Clark Honors College thesis and the English honors program may submit an English honors thesis, awarded a pass or pass with distinction, to fulfill the thesis requirement for both English department honors and the Clark Honors College thesis. Failing theses cannot earn English department honors or be used to satisfy the Clark Honors College thesis.

To apply for admission to the honors program, contact Paul Peppis, the program director and associate department head.

Minor in English

The English minor requires 24 credits of approved course work selected from the documents titled University of Oregon English Major Requirements and Advising Supplement, which are updated each year. Both documents are available in the English department office. Only courses with the ENG subject code and writing courses numbered WR 320, WR 321, or WR 423 may be used for the minor. Introduction to Literature (ENG 104, ENG 105, ENG 106) and transfer equivalents may not be used to satisfy minor requirements. A maximum of 8 credits may be taken in lower-division courses, and all upper-division courses must be taken in residence at the University of Oregon. Course work must be taken for letter grades and passed with grades of mid-C or better.

Minor in Comics and Cartoon Studies

This interdisciplinary minor in comics and cartoon studies presents students with an international, historical, and critical perspective on the art of comics, from editorial cartoons to comic books to graphic novels. In taking courses for this minor, students will be required to think beyond accustomed disciplinary boundaries and to analyze and experiment with the interaction of visual and linguistic systems of meaning.

To qualify for the minor, students must take 24 credits of approved courses, including one required course, Introduction to Comic Studies (ENG 280). The remaining courses may be selected from the range of comics-related courses offered through the Departments of Art, Comparative Literature, East Asian Languages and Literatures, English, Ethnic Studies, History of Art and Architecture, and Romance Languages, the Arts and Administration Program, and the School of Journalism and Communication. For details regarding these courses, students should consult the list of offerings available in the Department of English office or online at comics.uoregon.edu.

No more than 12 credits may be taken in lower-division courses, and course work must be passed with grades of mid-C or better.

Minor in Writing, Public Speaking, and Critical Reasoning

The minor in writing, public speaking, and critical reasoning prepares undergraduates for active and effective participation in the complex, diverse, and ever-changing communicative situations they will face after graduation.

Select two courses in writing from the following: 18
College Composition III
Scientific and Technical Writing
Business Communications
Theories of Literacy
The Art of the Sentence
Advanced Composition
Select two courses in rhetoric from the following (at least one of which must be ENG 200 or ENG 330): 18
Public Speaking as a Liberal Art 2
Oral Controversy and Advocacy
Rhetoric and Ethics
History of Rhetoric and Composition
Modern Rhetorical Criticism
Select two courses in reasoning from the following: 18
Critical Reasoning
Logic, Inquiry, and Argumentation
Inventing Arguments
Total Credits24
1

Reasoning, Speaking, Writing (ENG 494)Internship: [Topic] (ENG 404) or Independent Writing Project (WR 198) may be taken to satisfy one course requirement.

2

If not already taken.

Kindergarten through Secondary Teaching Careers

Students who complete a degree in English are eligible to apply to the College of Education’s fifth-year licensure program in middle-secondary teaching or the fifth-year licensure program in elementary teaching. More information is available from the department’s education advisors, Elizabeth Wheeler and Mary Wood; see also the College of Education section of this catalog.

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years. There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

Bachelor of Arts in English

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
WR 121 College Composition I 4
First term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in science 4
Lower-division elective course with ENG subject code 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Lower-division elective course with ENG subject code 4
 Credits 16
Spring
ENG 205 Genre: [Topic] 4
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ENG 301 Foundations of the English Major: Context 4
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in science 4
Multicultural course in American cultures or international cultures 4
 Credits 16
Winter
ENG 302 Foundations of the English Major: Theory 4
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in science 4
Multicultural course in American cultures or international cultures 4
 Credits 16
Spring
ENG 303 Foundations of the English Major: Text 4
Third term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
ENG 209 The Craft of the Sentence 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
ENG 300 Introduction to Literary Criticism Student should have completed ENG 301–303 sequence4
FLR 320 Car Cultures 4
ENG 340 Jewish Writers Student should have completed the two-course ENG 205 requirement4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 16
Winter
ENG 315 4
ENG 436 Advanced Shakespeare Student should have completed the BA language requirement4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 16
Spring
ENG 407 Seminar: [Topic] 1-5
ENG 427 Chaucer 4
General-education course in social science 4
Multicultural course in international cultures 4
 Credits 13-17
 Total Credits 45-49
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
Upper-division elective course with ENG subject code 4
Three elective courses 12
 Credits 16
Winter
Upper-division elective course with ENG subject code 4
Three elective courses 12
 Credits 16
Spring
Four elective courses 16
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

The Department of English offers graduate study in English and American literature, film studies, folklore, critical theory, rhetoric and composition, and cultural studies. It offers the master of arts (MA) and doctor of philosophy (PhD) degrees in English. Detailed descriptions of these programs and instructions about how to apply to the English graduate program are available on the department’s website.

Master of Arts Degree

The Department of English offers an MA for students who want to study beyond the BA but who do not plan to complete a PhD. Students whose goal is a doctorate should apply for admission to the department’s doctoral program (described below). Students who complete the MA program at the University of Oregon and want to enter the PhD program must reapply to the department for admission into that program.

The number of seats in the MA program is limited, and admission is competitive.

Admission Requirements

  1. An undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.50 or, if the student has 12 or more credits of graduate work in English, a graduate GPA of 3.50 or better
  2. The submission of scores on the verbal and analytical writing sections of the general test of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE).
  3. For nonnative speakers: a minimum score of 600 on the paper-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or a minimum score of 100 on the Internet-based test

Admission Procedures

Information on applying to the graduate program may be obtained from the department website or from the department office. Application materials are submitted electronically at https://gradweb.uoregon.edu/online_app/application/guidelines2.htm. The following information is part of the application process and must be submitted electronically:

  • Degree transcripts (unofficial copies are acceptable)
  • Contact information (names, e-mail addresses) for three people willing to write letters of recommendation
  • A personal statement (500-word maximum) of background and objectives in pursuing the course of study
  • A writing sample that demonstrates the applicant’s ability in literary, film, folklore, or cultural studies (5,000-word maximum, including bibliography and notes)

In addition to the transcripts uploaded to the online application, official copies of transcripts should be mailed to the Office of Admissions, 1217 University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403-1286.

Information about graduate teaching fellowships may be found on the department website.

The application deadline for admission is January 15. Candidates are admitted only for fall term.

The completed file is reviewed by the department’s graduate admissions committee, which notifies the applicant of its decision. All admissions are conditional.

Master of Arts Degree Requirements

ENG 690Introduction to Graduate Studies in English5
Select one of the following:
Pre-1500 course
1500-1660 course
1660–1800 course
Select one of the following:
19th-century course
20th-century course
Rhetoric or advanced theory course
Nine formal 600-level seminars

A master's thesis may be substituted for one elective seminar with the prior approval of the director of graduate studies in consultation with the faculty thesis advisor. The MA thesis is a substantial scholarly essay researched and written over two terms during the second year of study.

Graduate course work should be completed at the 600 level. Exceptions to this policy must be made in advance by the director of graduate studies in consultation with the individual faculty advisor.

A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.50 in all graduate course work at the UO is required for completion of the MA degree. At least nine courses must be taken in residence at the University of Oregon.

Students who have completed 12 graduate-level English courses (nine taken at the university), attained reading knowledge of one foreign language, and maintained a cumulative GPA of 3.30 or better may apply for the MA degree with a specialty in English or American literature.

Language Requirement

Completion of the degree requires reading competence in one foreign language. Reading competence may be demonstrated by a B+ average in the yearlong Old English sequence; a grade of mid-B or better in the last term of a second-year language course or an approved 300-, 400-, or 600-level literature course with readings in the target language; scoring at required levels on the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) test; or passing the Toronto Medieval Latin examination at the master’s level.

Interdisciplinary MA

See the description of the Interdisciplinary Studies: Individualized Program (IS:IP) in the Graduate School section of this catalog.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Students who want to pursue a PhD at the University of Oregon should apply directly to the doctoral program. Students in the doctoral program who have not earned an MA prior to being admitted may receive the MA at the appropriate stage of their course of study, typically at the end of the second year (subject to the fulfillment of department and university MA requirements listed in the Graduate School section of this catalog).

The number of places in the PhD program is limited, and admission is competitive.

Admission Requirements

  1. A bachelor of arts (BA) or a master of arts (MA) in English or a related field, with at least a 3.50 graduate grade point average (GPA)
  2. The submission of scores on the verbal and analytical writing sections of the general test of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE); the score on the subject test for literature in English is optional
  3. For nonnative speakers: a minimum score of 600 on the paper-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or a minimum score of 100 on the Internet-based version

Admission procedures are the same as for MA degrees. The application deadline is December 15; candidates are admitted only for fall term.

Residency Requirements

The Graduate School requires at least three years of full-time work beyond the bachelor’s degree for the doctorate with at least one year spent in continuous residence on the Eugene campus. The Graduate School requires three consecutive terms (fall, winter, spring) with a minimum of 9 graduate credits of formal course work per term for the PhD year of residency; graduate teaching fellows must also enroll for a minimum of 9 graduate credits each term they hold a GTF appointment.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Requirements

ENG 614Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory5
ENG 690Introduction to Graduate Studies in English5
Select two of the following: 1
Pre-1500 course
1500-1660 course
1660–1800 course
Select two of the following: 1
19th century course
20th century course
Rhetoric or advanced theory course
Twelve seminars 2
1

Film and folklore courses are included under the appropriate time period.

2

The seminars, constituting the individual plan of study, may be distributed among any areas, and the plan must be approved by the student’s graduate faculty advisor and the director of graduate studies before the second year of study.

Graduate course work should be completed at the 600 level. Exceptions to this policy must be made in advance by the director of graduate studies in consultation with the individual faculty advisor.

A cumulative GPA of 3.50 or better in all graduate work at the UO is the minimum requirement for satisfactory progress toward the PhD.

Second Language

The graduate language requirement for the doctoral degree is reading competence in two non-English languages or high proficiency in one. Reading competence may be demonstrated in each of two foreign languages as specified under the language requirement for the MA degree. High proficiency may be demonstrated by a grade of A– or better in an approved 400-, 500-, or 600-level literature course, with readings in the target language; scoring at the required levels on the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) test; or passing the Toronto Medieval Latin examination at the PhD level.

Students may petition the graduate committee to test in languages that don’t fit the above criteria.

Teaching

Doctoral candidates must have experience as classroom teachers in the department before they receive the degree.

Structured Emphasis

Students may define their individual plan of study according to one of seven structured emphasis options: ethnic literary studies, film studies, folklore, literature and the environment, medieval studies, poetry and poetics, or rhetoric and composition. Each emphasis has a focused set of courses and a special section.

Breadth Examination

Doctoral candidates must take the PhD breadth examination at the beginning of the third year of study, or, if they enter with 6 or more transfer credits, at the beginning of the second year of study. The student and the student’s advisor select two examination fields chosen for proximity to and/or importance for the separate, primary research field and project. These fields may provide broad familiarity with readings, texts, or methods that will inform dissertation research, and may also develop areas of relevant professional or teaching competence. They may include historical fields adjacent to the primary research field; genres; or areas of critical theory. The examination includes written (take-home) and oral components based on reading lists generated by the student in consultation with faculty examiners and approved by the Graduate Committee. A student must pass the breadth examination in order to take the PhD major field examination, administered the following year. Students who fail either written portion of the breadth examination do not take the oral portion until they have retaken and passed the failed written part; retakes will occur at the end of that term, postponing the PhD major field examination to the following term.

Major Field Examination

After students in the PhD program have completed their course work, they must take a two-and-a-half-hour major field examination. Typically taken fall term following completion of all course work and the language requirement, the major field examination provides each student with the opportunity to present and defend a short paper on a topic related to the dissertation. The examination also allows the student to demonstrate expertise in his or her field of specialization. It is divided into two parts:

  1. A discussion of a relatively broad field of study that provides a context for the topic or problem examined in part two
  2. A prepared presentation by the student on a topic or problem of the student’s choice that is related to the dissertation, followed by a discussion of that topic

The topic and areas covered by the major field examination are defined, in the form of a project description and reading list, by the student in consultation with an advisor or advisors and must be approved by the English department graduate committee. As a supplement to the major field examination, a student may choose to complete a one- to two-hour written examination on part two. The major field examination may be retaken only once.

PhD Dissertation

After completing all other degree requirements, the candidate should consult with a faculty advisor willing to work in the area of the student’s interest and submit a dissertation prospectus for approval by the student’s dissertation committee. Once the prospectus is approved by the committee and the director of graduate studies, the student is advanced to candidacy. A three-year period for completion of the dissertation begins when the Graduate School approves the advancement to candidacy.

The dissertation may be a work of literary, film, folklore, or linguistic scholarship or, with the approval of the committee, a collection of three substantial essays exhibiting internal coherence though not necessarily treating a single subject. The candidate gives an oral presentation or defense of the dissertation when it is completed and found acceptable by the committee.

Certificate in Writing, Public Speaking, and Critical Reasoning

The English department's certificate in writing, public speaking, and critical reasoning is available to all University of Oregon undergraduates in any minor. 

A certificate in writing, public speaking, and critical reasoning requires 36 credits as follows:

Select three courses in writing (at least one at the 400 level):12
Theories of Literacy
The Art of the Sentence
College Composition III
Scientific and Technical Writing
Business Communications
Advanced Composition
Select three courses in rhetoric (at least one of which must be ENG 200 or ENG 330):12
Public Speaking as a Liberal Art
Oral Controversy and Advocacy
Rhetoric and Ethics
History of Rhetoric and Composition
Modern Rhetorical Criticism
Select two courses in reasoning:8
Inventing Arguments
Critical Reasoning
Logic, Inquiry, and Argumentation
One capstone course:4
Reasoning, Speaking, Writing 1
Total Credits36
1

Rhetoric and Ethics (ENG 491) may serve as the capstone course in years when Reasoning, Speaking, Writing (ENG 494) is not taught.

Courses

Course usage information

ENG 104. Introduction to Literature: Fiction. 4 Credits.

Works representing the principal literary genres.

Course usage information

ENG 105. Introduction to Literature: Drama. 4 Credits.

Works representing the principal literary genres.

Course usage information

ENG 106. Introduction to Literature: Poetry. 4 Credits.

Works representing the principal literary genres.

Course usage information

ENG 107. World Literature. 4 Credits.

Reading and analysis of selected works in a global survey of ancient literatures, 2500 BCE–1500 CE.

Course usage information

ENG 108. World Literature. 4 Credits.

Reading and analysis of selected works in a global survey of the early modern period to the industrial revolution, 1500 CE–1789 CE.

Course usage information

ENG 109. World Literature. 4 Credits.

Reading and analysis of selected works in a global survey from the industrial revolution onward, 1789 CE–present.

Course usage information

ENG 110. Introduction to Film and Media. 4 Credits.

Basic critical approaches to film and media studies. Analysis and interpretation of film and media.

Course usage information

ENG 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 200. Public Speaking as a Liberal Art. 4 Credits.

Study and practice of public speaking as grounded in the five rhetorical canons of invention, arrangement, style, delivery, and memory.
Prereq: WR 122 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ENG 205. Genre: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Traces the historical development and transformations of key genres for the study of English and American literature and culture, including canonical and popular literary as well as media forms. Repeatable once for a maximum of 8 credits when topic changes.

Course usage information

ENG 207. Shakespeare. 4 Credits.

The major plays in chronological order with emphasis on the early and middle plays through "Hamlet."

Course usage information

ENG 208. Shakespeare. 4 Credits.

The major plays in chronological order with emphasis on the later plays beginning with "Twelfth Night."

Course usage information

ENG 209. The Craft of the Sentence. 4 Credits.

Study of basic sentence mechanics, grammatical terminology, and the conventions of punctuation. Includes some historical background on the development of English grammar. Students cannot receive credit for both ENG 209 and LING 494.

Course usage information

ENG 215. Survey of American Literature. 4 Credits.

American literature from its beginnings to 1850.

Course usage information

ENG 216. Survey of American Literature. 4 Credits.

American literature from 1850 to the present.

Course usage information

ENG 225. Age of King Arthur. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the literature of the Middle Ages set against the backdrop of medieval culture.

Course usage information

ENG 230. Introduction to Environmental Literature. 4 Credits.

Introduction to literature that examines the human place in the natural world. Consideration of how writers understand environmental crises and scientific ideas of their generation.

Course usage information

ENG 240. Introduction to Disability Studies. 4 Credits.

Introduces students to central concepts and essential texts in disability studies and applies them to literary and cultural texts, with a focus on racial diversity and learning directly from writers and scholars who experience a wide spectrum of bodymind variabilities.

Course usage information

ENG 241. Introduction to African American Literature. 4 Credits.

African American literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts.

Course usage information

ENG 242. Introduction to Asian American Literature. 4 Credits.

Asian American literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts.

Course usage information

ENG 243. Introduction to Chicano and Latino Literature. 4 Credits.

Chicano and Latino literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts.

Course usage information

ENG 244. Introduction to Native American Literature. 4 Credits.

Native American literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts.

Course usage information

ENG 245. Introduction to Ethnic American Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

American ethnic literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts. Repeatable once when topic changes for a maximum of 8 credits.

Course usage information

ENG 250. Literature and Digital Culture. 4 Credits.

This course will focus on the intersection of digital culture and literary studies. Students will learn how to use digital tools to study literature. Simultnaeously, they will use literary analysis approaches to study contemporary digital culture.

Course usage information

ENG 260. Media Aesthetics. 4 Credits.

Conventions of visual representation in still photography, motion pictures, and video.

Course usage information

ENG 265. History of the Motion Picture. 4 Credits.

Studies the historical evolution of cinema as an institution and art form from its origins to present. Sequence with ENG 266, 267.

Course usage information

ENG 266. History of the Motion Picture. 4 Credits.

Studies the historical evolution of cinema as an institution and art form from its origins to present. Sequence with ENG 265, 267.

Course usage information

ENG 267. History of the Motion Picture. 4 Credits.

Studies the historical evolution of cinema as an institution and art form from its origins to present. Sequence with ENG 265, 266.

Course usage information

ENG 280. Introduction to Comic Studies. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the art of comics and the methodologies of comics studies.

Course usage information

ENG 300. Introduction to Literary Criticism. 4 Credits.

Various techniques and approaches to literary criticism (e.g., historical, feminist, formalist, deconstructionist, Freudian, Marxist, semiotic) and their applications.
Prereq: sophomore standing.

Course usage information

ENG 301. Foundations of the English Major: Context. 4 Credits.

Chronological study of literary and media works in English, beginnings to the present, emphasizing their cultural and historical contexts. Series with ENG 302, ENG 303.
Prereq: ENG 205.

Course usage information

ENG 302. Foundations of the English Major: Theory. 4 Credits.

Chronological study of literary and media works in English, beginnings to the present, emphasizing disciplinary history and theoretical debates. Series with ENG 301, ENG 303.
Prereq: ENG 205.

Course usage information

ENG 303. Foundations of the English Major: Text. 4 Credits.

Chronological study of literary and media works in English, beginnings to the present, emphasizing analytic reading and writing skills. Series with ENG 301, ENG 303.
Prereq: ENG 301 or ENG 302.

Course usage information

ENG 313. Teen and Children's Literature. 4 Credits.

Books for young readers, their social implications and historical context, from the 19th century to the present. This is a service learning course, which explores the interplay between the classroom experience and the co-requisite internship volunteering with youth at K-12 schools and nonprofit agencies.
Prereq: sophomore standing.

Course usage information

ENG 316. Women Writers' Forms: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Women's writing in a particular genre or form (prose, fiction, drama, poetry, autobiography, folksong) examined in the context of current feminist literary theories. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: sophomore standing.

Course usage information

ENG 321. English Novel. 4 Credits.

Rise of the novel from Defoe to Austen.

Course usage information

ENG 322. English Novel. 4 Credits.

Rise of the novel from Scott to Hardy.

Course usage information

ENG 323. English Novel. 4 Credits.

Rise in the novel from Conrad to the present.

Course usage information

ENG 325. Literature of the Northwest. 4 Credits.

Survey of significant Pacific Northwest literature as set against the principles of literary regionalism. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: Sophomore standing.

Course usage information

ENG 330. Oral Controversy and Advocacy. 4 Credits.

In-depth study of the habits of research, reasoning, selection, and presentation necessary for ethical and effective oral advocacy on contested topics. Not open to freshmen.
Prereq: WR 122 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ENG 335. Inventing Arguments. 4 Credits.

Analysis and use of patterns of reasoning derived from the disciplines of rhetoric, informal logic, cognitive science, and the theory of argumentation.
Prereq: WR 122 or WR 123.

Course usage information

ENG 340. Jewish Writers. 4 Credits.

Forms and varieties of fiction, poetry, and drama by Jewish writers from the 19th century to the present.

Course usage information

ENG 360. African American Writers. 4 Credits.

Examines the origins and development of African American literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts.
Prereq: sophomore standing.

Course usage information

ENG 361. Native American Writers. 4 Credits.

Examines the origins and development of Native American literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts. Course will be taught once or more per academic year.
Prereq: Sophomore standing.

Course usage information

ENG 362. Asian American Writers. 4 Credits.

Examines the origins and development of Asian American literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts. Course will be taught once or more per academic year.
Prereq: Sophomore standing.

Course usage information

ENG 363. Chicano and Latino Writers. 4 Credits.

Examines the origins and development of Chicano and Latino literature and culture in relevant intellectual, social, and historical contexts. Course will be taught once or more per academic year.
Prereq: Sophomore standing.

Course usage information

ENG 364. Comparative Ethnic American Literatures. 4 Credits.

Comparative examination of major issues in African, Asian, Chicano, and Native American literatures and cultures in relevant contexts. Course will be taught once or more per academic year.
Prereq: Sophomore standing.

Course usage information

ENG 380. Film, Media, and History. 4 Credits.

Study of the history of institutions and industries that shape production and reception of film and media.

Course usage information

ENG 381. Film, Media, and Culture. 4 Credits.

Study of film and media as aesthetic objects that engage with communities identified by class, gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.

Course usage information

ENG 385. Graphic Narratives and Cultural Theory. 4 Credits.

Survey of 20th- and 21st- century graphic novels in the context of cultural theory. Sophomore standing required. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ENG 386. Bodies in Comics. 4 Credits.

Examines questions and representations of bodily identity in comics through the lenses of disability studies and gender theory.

Course usage information

ENG 391. American Novel. 4 Credits.

Development of the American novel from its beginnings to 1900.

Course usage information

ENG 392. American Novel. 4 Credits.

Development of the American novel from 1900 to present.

Course usage information

ENG 394. 20th-Century Literature. 4 Credits.

Modern literature from American, British, and European cultures, 1890 to 1945. Significant works of poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction in relation to intellectual and historical developments.

Course usage information

ENG 395. 20th-Century Literature. 4 Credits.

Modern literature from American, British, and European cultures, 1945 to present. Significant works of poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction in relation to intellectual and historical developments.

Course usage information

ENG 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: sophomore standing.

Course usage information

ENG 400M. Temporary Multilisted Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

On- or off-campus internship in a variety of writing or literacy-related settings in connection with designated courses. Repeatable.
Prereq: junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Selected seminars offered each year.

Course usage information

ENG 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Selected topics offered each year.
Prereq: junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 412. Literary Editing. 4 Credits.

Study of principles and practices of editing contemporary literature. Prepares the student for work in the trade.

Course usage information

ENG 413. Theories of Literacy. 4 Credits.

Approaches to literacy through literary theory, rhetoric and cultural studies. Examines issues involved with school and community literacy.
Pre- or coreq: ENG 404 Internship: Community Literacy; junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 419. Contemporary Literary Theory. 4 Credits.

Developments in critical thinking after the New Criticism.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 420. The Art of the Sentence. 4 Credits.

Analysis of English grammar and style in literary and academic contexts. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 423. The Age of Beowulf. 4 Credits.

A reading of Anglo-Saxon literature and culture as the intersection of Germanic, Celtic, and Christian traditions. Readings include Irish epic, Welsh romance, Norse mythology, and Icelandic saga.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 425. Medieval Romance. 4 Credits.

Study of selected romances in the context of European intellectual and social history. May include elementary linguistic introduction to Middle English.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 427. Chaucer. 4 Credits.

Close textual study of selected Canterbury Tales in Middle English; instruction in the grammar and pronunciation of Chaucer's language.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 428. Old English I. 4 Credits.

Introduction to Old English language. Sequence with ENG 429, 430.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 429. Old English II: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Study of Old English prose or poetry in the original language. Sequence with ENG 428, 430. Repeatable twice when topic changes.
Prereq: ENG 428.

Course usage information

ENG 430. Old English III: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Study of Beowulf or works by other major Old English authors in the original language. Sequence with ENG 428, 429. Repeatable twice when topic changes.
Prereq: ENG 429

Course usage information

ENG 434. Spenser. 4 Credits.

Examines the works of Edmund Spenser.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 436. Advanced Shakespeare. 4 Credits.

Detailed study of selected plays, poetry, or both.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 438. Shakespeare's Rivals. 4 Credits.

Representative plays by Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, and other early 17th-century dramatists.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 442. Milton. 4 Credits.

"Paradise Lost," "Paradise Regained," and "Samson Agonistes."
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 448. Restoration and 18th-Century Literature. 4 Credits.

Johnson and his circle; classic to romantic; relations between England and the Enlightenment in France.

Course usage information

ENG 451. 19th-Century Studies: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Comparative studies of selected problems and figures on both sides of the Atlantic; treating topics in literature, the fine arts, and social history. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

ENG 454. English Romantic Writers. 4 Credits.

Romantic thought and expression. The first generation including Blake, Coleridge, Dorothy and William Wordsworth.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 461. American Literature to 1800. 4 Credits.

Readings in American poetry, nonfiction prose, drama, and fiction.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 467. American Literature, 1900-Present. 4 Credits.

Readings in American poetry, nonfiction prose, drama, and fiction.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 468. Ethnic Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Advanced study of one or more authors or literary genres related to ethnic literature including African, Native, Asian, or Chicano American. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 469. Literature and the Environment: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

In-depth study of various topics related to literature and the environment including Bioart/Bioethics, Biosemiotics, Critical Animal Studies, Food Culture, Ideas of Wilderness, Rhetoric of Nature Writing, Virtual Ecologies. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 470. Technologies and Texts Capstone. 4 Credits.

This course examines the way humanities disciplines use digital technologies to forge a new role in the public sphere, exploring how digital and print cultures (re)shape forms of cultural expression and knowledge production. Students will create their own digital projects in this course.

Course usage information

ENG 475. Modern Poetry. 4 Credits.

20th-century British and American poetry with emphasis on the modernist period, 1910–45. Representative authors include Yeats, Stein, Pound, Eliot, H. D., Williams, and Stevens.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 476. Modern Fiction. 4 Credits.

Representative modern fiction writers in English, American, and Continental literatures, such as Joyce, Woolf, Stein, Faulkner, Proust, Kafka, and Mann.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 479. Major Authors: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

In-depth study of one to three major authors from medieval through modern periods. Repeatable.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 480. Modern American Superhero. 4 Credits.

Examination of the path of the American comic book superhero and an exploration of the ways in which that journey reflects large processes of social change.

Course usage information

ENG 485. Television Studies. 4 Credits.

Study of television's institutional contents and representational practices, including such television genres as serials, news, and reality TV. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ENG 486. New Media and Digital Culture. 4 Credits.

Study of media emerging from computer-based and digital techniques, including digital cinema, cyborgs, interactive games, multiplayer online simulations, and viral videos. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ENG 488. Race and Representation in Film: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Screening, interpretation, and analysis of films from developing non-European cultures and by people of color. Mechanisms of racism in dominant U.S. media. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 491. Rhetoric and Ethics. 4 Credits.

Investigation of historical and contemporary theories of ethical rhetoric in both written and oral arguments.
Prereq: WR 122 or 123.

Course usage information

ENG 492. History of Rhetoric and Composition. 4 Credits.

History of rhetoric as related to the theory and practice of writing, relations between rhetoric and poetics, and rhetorical criticism through the 19th century.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 493. Modern Rhetorical Criticism. 4 Credits.

Theoretical topics addressed by 20th-century rhetorical critics. Varieties of rhetorical interpretation, from neo-Aristotelian to reader-response, postmodernist views of metaphor.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 494. Reasoning, Speaking, Writing. 4 Credits.

Application of advanced study in argumentation theory, particularly procedural standards of rationality developed in recent argumentation studies, to selected public policy controversies.

Course usage information

ENG 496. Feminist Film Criticism: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Critical analysis of film and television texts from a feminist perspective. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

ENG 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Selected seminars offered each year.

Course usage information

ENG 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Selected topics offered each year.

Course usage information

ENG 512. Literary Editing. 4 Credits.

Study of principles and practices of editing contemporary literature. Prepares the student for work in the trade.

Course usage information

ENG 513. Theories of Literacy. 4 Credits.

Approaches to literacy through literary theory, rhetoric and cultural studies. Examines issues involved with school and community literacy.
Pre- or coreq: ENG 604.

Course usage information

ENG 519. Contemporary Literary Theory. 4 Credits.

Developments in critical thinking after the New Criticism.

Course usage information

ENG 520. The Art of the Sentence. 4 Credits.

Analysis of English grammar and style in literary and academic contexts. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ENG 528. Old English I. 4 Credits.

Introduction to Old English language. Sequence with ENG 529, 530.

Course usage information

ENG 529. Old English II: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Study of Old English prose or poetry in the original language. Sequence with ENG 528, 530. Repeatable twice when topic changes.
Prereq: ENG 4/528.

Course usage information

ENG 530. Old English III: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Study of Beowulf or works by other major Old English authors in the original language. Sequence with ENG 528, 529. Repeatable twice when topic changes.
Prereq: ENG 4/529.

Course usage information

ENG 534. Spenser. 4 Credits.

Examines the works of Edmund Spenser.

Course usage information

ENG 536. Advanced Shakespeare. 4 Credits.

Detailed study of selected plays, poetry, or both.

Course usage information

ENG 538. Shakespeare's Rivals. 4 Credits.

Representative plays by Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, and other early 17th-century dramatists.

Course usage information

ENG 542. Milton. 4 Credits.

"Paradise Lost," "Paradise Regained," and "Samson Agonistes."

Course usage information

ENG 548. Restoration and 18th-Century Literature. 4 Credits.

Johnson and his circle; classic to romantic; relations between England and the Enlightenment in France.

Course usage information

ENG 551. 19th-Century Studies: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Comparative studies of selected problems and figures on both sides of the Atlantic; treating topics in literature, the fine arts, and social history. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

ENG 554. English Romantic Writers. 4 Credits.

Romantic thought and expression. The first generation including Blake, Coleridge, Dorothy and William Wordsworth.

Course usage information

ENG 561. American Literature to 1800. 4 Credits.

Readings in American poetry, nonfiction prose, drama, and fiction.

Course usage information

ENG 567. American Literature, 1900-Present. 4 Credits.

Readings in American poetry, nonfiction prose, drama, and fiction.

Course usage information

ENG 568. Ethnic Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Advanced study of one or more authors or literary genres related to ethnic literature including African, Native, Asian, or Chicano American. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

ENG 569. Literature and the Environment: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

In-depth study of various topics related to literature and the environment including Bioart/Bioethics, Biosemiotics, Critical Animal Studies, Food Culture, Ideas of Wilderness, Rhetoric of Nature Writing, Virtual Ecologies. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

ENG 570. Technologies and Texts Capstone. 4 Credits.

This course examines the way humanities disciplines use digital technologies to forge a new role in the public sphere, exploring how digital and print cultures (re)shape forms of cultural expression and knowledge production. Students will create their own digital projects in this course.

Course usage information

ENG 575. Modern Poetry. 4 Credits.

20th-century British and American poetry with emphasis on the modernist period, 1910–45. Representative authors include Yeats, Stein, Pound, Eliot, H. D., Williams, and Stevens.

Course usage information

ENG 576. Modern Fiction. 4 Credits.

Representative modern fiction writers in English, American, and Continental literatures, such as Joyce, Woolf, Stein, Faulkner, Proust, Kafka, and Mann.

Course usage information

ENG 579. Major Authors. 4 Credits.

In depth study of one to three major authors from medieval through modern periods. Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 580. Modern American Superhero. 4 Credits.

Examination of the path of the American comic book superhero and an exploration of the ways in which that journey reflects large processes of social change.

Course usage information

ENG 585. Television Studies. 4 Credits.

Study of television's institutional contents and representational practices, including such television genres as serials, news, and reality TV. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ENG 586. New Media and Digital Culture. 4 Credits.

Study of media emerging from computer-based and digital techniques, including digital cinema, cyborgs, interactive games, multiplayer online simulations, and viral videos. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

ENG 588. Race and Representation in Film: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Screening, interpretation, and analysis of films from developing non-European cultures and by people of color. Mechanisms of racism in dominant U.S. media. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

ENG 591. Rhetoric and Ethics. 4 Credits.

Investigation of historical and contemporary theories of ethical rhetoric in both written and oral arguments.
Prereq: WR 122 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ENG 592. History of Rhetoric and Composition. 4 Credits.

History of rhetoric as related to the theory and practice of writing, relations between rhetoric and poetics, and rhetorical criticism through the 19th century.

Course usage information

ENG 593. Modern Rhetorical Criticism. 4 Credits.

Theoretical topics addressed by 20th-century rhetorical critics. Varieties of rhetorical interpretation, from neo-Aristotelian to reader-response, postmodernist views of metaphor.

Course usage information

ENG 596. Feminist Film Criticism: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Critical analysis of film and television texts from a feminist perspective. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

ENG 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 603. Dissertation. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable. On- or off-campus internship in a variety of writing or literacy-related settings.

Course usage information

ENG 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Selected seminars offered each year.

Course usage information

ENG 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 609. Terminal Project. 1-16 Credits.

Course usage information

ENG 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 611. Composition Graduate Teaching Fellow Seminar I. 1-3 Credits.

Issues in pedagogy related to the university's writing requirement.

Course usage information

ENG 612. Composition Graduate Teaching Fellow Seminar II. 1-3 Credits.

Discussions designed to increase the effectiveness of first-year graduate teaching fellows as teachers of courses that fulfill the university's writing requirement.

Course usage information

ENG 613. Graduate Teaching Fellow Composition Apprenticeship. 1-3 Credits.

Supervised practical experience in all aspects of teaching WR 121, 122.
Prereq: ENG 611 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ENG 614. Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. 5 Credits.

Introduces students to a number of the most important and influential developments in 20th-century literary and cultural theory. Graduate seminar.

Course usage information

ENG 615. Advanced Studies in Literary Theory: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Intensive study of one to three major theorists or a significant theoretical problem. Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 620. Medieval Literature: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Recent offerings include Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, Humor and Vulgarity in Medieval Literature. Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 630. Renaissance Literature: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Recent offerings include Hamlet, Jacobean Potboilers, Renaissance Irrationalities. Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 645. 18th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Intensive study of one to three major authors or selected topics from the 18th century. Recent offerings include Enlightenment and Revolution. Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 650. 19th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Recent topics include Scottish Fiction and Cultural Nationalism, Heroine and the English Novel. Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 660. American Literature: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Recent offerings include African American Women Writers, Evolutionary Theories and Narrative, Sentimental Novel, V. Deloria and Native American Cultural Values. Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 670. Modern Literature: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Recent offerings include H. James, Modernist Politics, Environmental Humanities, Postmodernism. Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 690. Introduction to Graduate Studies in English. 5 Credits.

Examination of selected professional, methodological, and theoretical issues.

Course usage information

ENG 691. Composition Theory: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Intensive study of topics related to rhetorical theory and the teaching of writing. Repeatable.

Course usage information

ENG 695. Film Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Intensive study of selected topics related to film studies and literature. Recent topics include Introduction to Film Theory; Feminism, Comedy, and the Carnivalesque; Melodrama. Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

WR 121. College Composition I. 4 Credits.

Written reasoning as discovery and inquiry. Frequent essays explore relationship of thesis to structure and audience. Strong focus on the process of revising. Regular work on editing.
Prereq: SAT Reading and Writing scores both below 36, or SAT verbal score below 710 if taken before March 2016, or ACT verbal score below 32, or equivalent.

Course usage information

WR 122. College Composition II. 4 Credits.

Written reasoning as a process of argument. Developing and supporting theses in response to complex questions. Attention to critical reading in academic setting. Continuing focus on revising and editing.
Prereq: WR 121 or equivalent.

Course usage information

WR 123. College Composition III. 4 Credits.

Written reasoning in the context of research. Practice in writing documented essays based on the use of sources. Continuing focus on revising and editing.
Prereq: WR 121 or equivalent.

Course usage information

WR 195. Writing Tutorial. 1 Credit.

Provides students concurrently enrolled in WR 121 with one-on-one tutoring. Enrollment priority based on entrance exam (SAT or ACT) scores. Repeatable once.
Coreq: WR 121.

Course usage information

WR 198. Independent Writing Project. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable. Supervised writing projects in nonfiction prose.
Prereq: WR 122 or equivalent.

Course usage information

WR 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WR 312. Principles of Tutoring Writing. 4 Credits.

The practice and ethics of tutoring writing in the context of writing in various academic disciplines. Theories of teaching, tutoring techniques, and assessment of writing.

Course usage information

WR 320. Scientific and Technical Writing. 4 Credits.

Emphasis on form, function, and style of scientific, professional, and technical writing; weekly writing assignments include proposals, reports, definitions, instructions, summaries. Use of documentation in publication.
Prereq: completion of university writing requirement; junior standing.

Course usage information

WR 321. Business Communications. 4 Credits.

Practice in writing and analyzing internal and external messages common to business, industry, and professions. Suggested for business and management students.
Prereq: completion of university writing requirement; junior standing.

Course usage information

WR 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: sophomore standing.

Course usage information

WR 408. Independent Writing Projects. 1-3 Credits.

Supervised writing projects in nonfiction prose. Repeatable.

Course usage information

WR 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: Junior standing.

Course usage information

WR 423. Advanced Composition. 4 Credits.

Emphasis on critical thinking skills and rhetorical strategies for advanced written reasoning in different academic disciplines.
Prereq: Completion of University Writing Requirement; junior standing.

Course usage information

WR 508. Independent Writing Projects. 1-3 Credits.

Supervised writing projects in nonfiction prose. Repeatable.