Folklore

http://folklore.uoregon.edu

Philip W. Scher, Program Director
541-346-5104
319 Condon Hall

The interdisciplinary Folklore Program offers perspectives on ethnic, regional, occupational, gender, and other traditional identities of individuals in specific societies and cultures. Students in the program study the extent to which traditions enrich and express the dynamics of human behavior throughout the world. Folklore courses examine the historical, cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions of such expressive forms as mythology, legend, folktale, art, music, dance, culinary practices, religion, ritual, and ceremony. Theoretical analyses, research methods, and fieldwork techniques are integral parts of the curriculum.

The Folklore Program offers bachelor of arts, master of arts, and master of science degrees in folklore. An undergraduate minor is also available. Folklore courses cover an extensive range of interdisciplinary topics: cultural heritage, ethnicity, subcultures, popular culture, performance, gender, film, religion, public folklore, and issues of diversity and globalization. Folklore graduates work in public and private agencies as educators, archivists, editors, arts and humanities consultants, museum curators, and festival planners.

Resources

Film and Folklore

A strength of the program is its emphasis on the use of film and video. Training is available in equipment use, fieldwork methodologies, and editing. 

Folklore Archive

The Randall V. Mills Archive of Northwest Folklore is a research repository available to folklore scholars and students. It houses raw field data, student and faculty research projects, and audio-visual materials including more than 7,000 slides. Located in 453 Prince Lucien Campbell Hall, the archive is open to the public.

Faculty

Martha J. Bayless, professor (Britain, Welsh, Old and Middle English medieval literature and culture). See English.

Doug Blandy, professor (art and community service, art and special populations). See Arts and Administration.

Dianne M. Dugaw, professor (Britain, ballads and folk song, 18th-century literature). See English.

Lisa M. Gilman, professor (gender, performance studies, Africa). See English.

D. Gantt Gurley, assistant professor (Scandinavian literature and folklore, Jewish literature and folklore, Old Norse literature). See German and Scandinavian.

Habib Iddrisu, assistant professor (Africa, dance, performance). See Dance.

Loren Kajikawa, associate professor (ethnomusicology, popular music, Japan). See Music.

Dorothee Ostmeier, professor (18th- and 20th-century literature, culture, philosophy). See German and Scandinavian.

Riki H. Saltzman, instructor (public folklore, foodways, ethnicity-identity); executive director, Oregon Folklife Network.

Philip W. Scher, professor (Caribbean, politics of culture, transnationalism). See Anthropology.

Carol T. Silverman, professor (performance, Eastern Europe, gender). See Anthropology.

Daniel N. Wojcik, professor (alternative religions, subcultures, vernacular arts). See English.

Ed Wolf, assistant professor (ethnomusicology, folklore, Latin American studies). See Music.

Participating

Ina Asim, history

Bob Bussel, Labor Education and Research Center

Carl R. Bybee, journalism and communication

Matthew Dennis, history

Patricia Dewey Lambert, arts and administration

Keith Eggener, history of art and architecture

Maria Fernanda Escallón, anthropology

Kingston Heath, historic preservation

Kenneth I. Helphand, landscape architecture

Lamia Karim, anthropology

Gabriela Martinez, journalism and communication

Debra L. Merskin, journalism and communication

Julianne H. Newton, journalism and communication

Jeffrey Ostler, history

Priscilla P. Ovalle, English

Gordon M. Sayre, English

Stephanie "Lani" Teves, ethnic studies, women's, gender, and sexuality studies

Stephanie Wood, College of Education

Stephen R. Wooten, international studies

Undergraduate Studies

Students studying folklore at the UO receive comprehensive training in scholarly approaches and methods for researching, documenting, and presenting traditional arts and cultural practices within the United States and abroad. Students majoring in folklore must earn a minimum of 48 credits, of which 32 must be upper division, and 20 of the 48 must be Folklore (FLR) credits.

Bachelor of Arts in Folklore

FLR 250Introduction to Folklore4
FLR 365Folklore Research Methods4
Three courses from Expressive Forms and Practices list12
Three courses from Diverse Communities list12
Electives from Electives list 116
Total Credits48
1

 Courses must be taught by faculty members of the Folklore Program.

Expressive Forms and Practices

Folklore
FLR 236Magic in the Middle Ages4
FLR 320Car Cultures4
FLR 350Folklore and the Bible4
FLR 411Folklore and Religion4
FLR 413Folk Art and Material Culture4
FLR 415Folklore and Foodways4
FLR 483Folklore and Mythology of the British Isles4
FLR 485Film and Folklore4
FLR 491Anglo-American Ballad and Folk Song4
Anthropology
ANTH 365Food and Culture4
ANTH 419Performance, Politics, and Folklore4
ANTH 493Anthropology and Popular Culture4
Arts and Administration
AAD 250Art and Human Values4
AAD 301Understanding Arts and Creative Sectors4
Dance
DAN 301African Dance Aesthetics4
German and Scandinavian
GER 356German Fairy Tales4
GER 407Seminar: [Topic] (Magic, Uncanny, Surrealistic, and Fantastic Tales)1-16
Music
MUS 358Music in World Cultures4
MUS 359Music of the Americas4
MUS 360Hip-Hop Music: History, Culture, Aesthetics4
MUS 365Regional Ethnomusicology: [Topic]4
MUS 451Introduction to Ethnomusicology4
MUS 452Musical Instruments of the World4
MUS 458Celtic Music4

Diverse Communities

Folklore
FLR 225Voices of Africa4
FLR 235Folklore and the Supernatural4
FLR 416African Folklore4
FLR 418Folklore and Gender4
Anthropology
ANTH 161Introduction to Cultural Anthropology4
ANTH 315Gender, Folklore, Inequality4
ANTH 326Caribbean Societies4
ANTH 429Jewish Folklore and Ethnology4
ANTH 430Balkan Society and Folklore4
ANTH 439Feminism and Ethnography4
Music
MUS 349American Ethnic and Protest Music3
MUS 358Music in World Cultures4
MUS 359Music of the Americas4
MUS 365Regional Ethnomusicology: [Topic]4
MUS 4574
MUS 460Music and Gender4
MUS 462Popular Musics in the African Diaspora4
Women's and Gender Studies
WGS 321Feminist Perspectives: Identity, Race, Culture4

Electives

Courses from the two lists above may count as electives if not fulfilling another requirement.

Folklore
FLR 199Special Studies: [Topic] (Folklore and Sport)4
FLR 245Folklore and the Pacific Northwest4
FLR 255Folklore and United States Popular Culture4
FLR 370Folklore and Sexuality4
FLR 401Research: [Topic]1-6
FLR 403Thesis1-6
FLR 404Internship: [Topic]1-8
FLR 405Reading and Conference: [Topic]1-6
FLR 406Field Studies: [Topic]1-6
FLR 408Workshop: [Topic]1-5
FLR 409Practicum: [Topic]1-6
FLR 414Mythology and Modern Fantasy Fiction4
Anthropology
ANTH 114Anthropology of Pirates and Piracy4
ANTH 119Anthropology and Aliens4
ANTH 4114
ANTH 420Culture, Illness, and Healing4
ANTH 450The Anthropology Museum4
ANTH 493Anthropology and Popular Culture4
Arts and Administration
AAD 421Cultural Programming4
AAD 451Community Cultural Development4
AAD 462Cultural Policy4
Scandanavian
SCAN 259Vikings through the Icelandic Sagas4
SCAN 325Constructions versus Constrictions of Identity4

Students may substitute courses to fulfill requirements with the approval of their major advisor. Programs from other departments or programs offering folklore-related courses include anthropology, arts and administration, classics, dance, English, ethnic studies, German and Scandinavian, historic preservation, humanities, international studies, journalism and communication, Judaic studies, music, religious studies, Romance languages, theater arts, and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies.

Residency Requirement

Twenty-eight credits of upper-division course work for the major must be completed at the University of Oregon.

Advising

Majors should construct their programs in consultation with an advisor from the core folklore faculty. At least two terms before graduation, students who want to apply for a folklore degree should consult the program director to obtain authorization and course work approval.

Minimum Grade

Course work required for the folklore major, both lower division and upper division, must be passed with grades of C– or better. No more than 8 pass/no pass credits may be applied to the major. 

Foreign Language Requirement

Majors must complete the university foreign-language requirement for the BA degree.

Minor in Folklore

Courses

The folklore minor requires the completion of 24 credits. Introduction to Folklore (FLR 250) is required of all minors. Remaining courses are selected from the list of courses on the Folklore Program website. Students may substitute courses from other departments to fulfill this requirement with the approval of their minor advisor. Programs from other departments and programs offering folklore-related courses include anthropology, arts and administration, classics, dance, English, ethnic studies, German and Scandinavian, historic preservation, humanities, international studies, journalism and communication, Judaic studies, music, religious studies, Romance languages, theater arts, and women’s and gender studies.

Residency Requirement

Sixteen credits of course work for the minor must be completed at the University of Oregon.

Advising

Minors should construct their programs in consultation with an advisor from the core folklore faculty. At least two terms before graduation, students who want to apply for a folklore minor should consult the program director to obtain authorization and course work approval.

Minimum Grade

Course work required for the folklore minor, both lower division and upper division, must be passed with grades of C– or better. No more than 4 pass/no pass credits may be applied to the folklore minor. 

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years. There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

Bachelor of Arts in Folklore

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
FLR 250 Introduction to Folklore Required for major arts and letters4
WR 121 College Composition I Required for degree4
ANTH 161 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology General education course in social science4
First term of first-year second-language sequence 4
 Credits 16
Winter
FLR 365 Folklore Research Methods Required for major4
WR 122 College Composition II Required for degree4
HIST 101 Western Civilization General education course in social science4
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 4
 Credits 16
Spring
FLR 199 Special Studies: [Topic] (Folklore and Sports) Program-approved course4
ANTH 163 Origins of Storytelling Science requirement4
PSY 201 Mind and Brain Science requirement4
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
FLR 235 Folklore and the Supernatural Program-approved course4
FLR 255 Folklore and United States Popular Culture Program-approved arts and letters course4
GEOG 142 Human Geography General education course in social science4
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4
 Credits 16
Winter
FLR 320 Car Cultures Program-approved course4
ANTH 280 Introduction to Language and Culture General education course in social science4
ANTH 341 Food Origins Science requirement4
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4
 Credits 16
Spring
FLR 225 Voices of Africa Program-approved course4
AAD 250 Art and Human Values Program-approved arts and letters course4
ENVS 345 Environmental Ethics Group-satisfying arts and letters course (minimum GPA 3.00 target)4
Third term of second-year second-language sequence 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
FLR 370 Folklore and Sexuality Program-approved course4
ANTH 365 Food and Culture 4
GEOG 361 Global Environmental Change Science requirement4
MUS 358 Music in World Cultures 4
 Credits 16
Winter
FLR 350 Folklore and the Bible Program-approved course4
FLR 411 Folklore and Religion Program-approved course4
ANTH 326 Caribbean Societies Program-approved course4
MUS 360 Hip-Hop Music: History, Culture, Aesthetics Program-approved course4
 Credits 16
Spring
ANTH 315 Gender, Folklore, Inequality 4
GER 356 German Fairy Tales Program-approved course4
MUS 359 Music of the Americas 4
WGS 321 Feminist Perspectives: Identity, Race, Culture 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
FLR 413 Folk Art and Material Culture Program-approved course4
FLR 415 Folklore and Foodways 4
FLR 485 Film and Folklore Program-approved course4
MUS 458 Celtic Music Program-approved course4
 Credits 16
Winter
FLR 416 African Folklore Program-approved course; apply for graduation4
AAD 451 Community Cultural Development 4
ANTH 420 Culture, Illness, and Healing Program-approved course4
ANTH 429 Jewish Folklore and Ethnology 4
 Credits 16
Spring
MUS 460 Music and Gender Program-approved course4
FLR 418 Folklore and Gender Program-approved course4
ANTH 439 Feminism and Ethnography Program-approved course4
AAD 462 Cultural Policy Program-approved course4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

The master of arts (MA) or master of science (MS) degree in folklore is interdisciplinary. In consultation with an advising committee, students take designated courses from faculty members in anthropology, arts and administration, English, folklore, German and Scandinavian, and music in addition to elective courses that strengthen their areas of expertise. A public folklore track is available to students preparing for careers in the public sector. A thesis or terminal project is required for completion of the degree. Students working toward an MA degree must demonstrate competence in a second language.

The Department of English’s PhD program offers a structured emphasis in folklore. For more information, see the English section of this catalog.

Admission Requirements

  1. An undergraduate GPA of at least 3.30 (B+)
  2. A minimum score of 153 on the verbal section of the general test of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), and a score of 4 or better on the analytical writing section (GRE-AW)
  3. For nonnative speakers: a minimum score of 575 on the paper-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or a minimum score of 88 on the Internet-based test

Application procedures are listed on the program website.

Master of Arts: General Folklore Track (63 credits)

Required Courses
FLR 681History and Theory of Folklore Research5
FLR 684Folklore Fieldwork Seminar 15
Interdisciplinary Core Courses 228
Folklore Core Courses
Seminar: [Topic] (Video Production)
Folklore and Religion
Folk Art and Material Culture
Mythology and Modern Fantasy Fiction
Folklore and Foodways
African Folklore
Folklore and Gender
Folklore and Mythology of the British Isles
Film and Folklore
Anglo-American Ballad and Folk Song
Anthropology Core Courses
ANTH 511
Performance, Politics, and Folklore
Jewish Folklore and Ethnology
Balkan Society and Folklore
Feminism and Ethnography
Anthropology and Popular Culture
Ethnographic Research: Epistemology, Methods, Ethics
Anthropological Linguistics
Arts and Administration Core Courses
Cultural Programming
Community Cultural Development
Cultural Policy
German and Scandinavian Core Courses
Seminar: [Topic] (Magic, Uncanny, Surrealistic and Fantastic Tales )
Translations-Transformations (Fairy Tales on the Move)
Music Core Courses
Introduction to Ethnomusicology
Musical Instruments of the World
MUS 557
Celtic Music
MUS 560
Popular Musics in the African Diaspora
Electives16
Select courses from the folklore core or outside that bolster areas of student expertise
Thesis or Terminal Project
FLR 503Thesis 39
or FLR 609 Terminal Project
1

Or other fieldwork course approved by advising committee.

2

12 of the 28 credits must be earned in folklore (FLR) courses.

3

Students complete a thesis or terminal project based on original research. The number of thesis or terminal project credits that a candidate may complete has no maximum, although only 9 credits count toward the degree. 

Courses are chosen in consultation with the student’s advising committee. Students may substitute courses not listed above to fulfill requirements with the approval of their advising committee.

Master of Science: General Folklore Track (63 credits)

Required Courses
FLR 681History and Theory of Folklore Research5
FLR 684Folklore Fieldwork Seminar 15
Interdisciplinary Core Courses 228
Folklore Core Courses
Seminar: [Topic] (Video Production)
Folklore and Religion
Folk Art and Material Culture
Mythology and Modern Fantasy Fiction
Folklore and Foodways
African Folklore
Folklore and Gender
Folklore and Mythology of the British Isles
Film and Folklore
Anglo-American Ballad and Folk Song
Anthropology Core Courses
ANTH 511
Performance, Politics, and Folklore
Jewish Folklore and Ethnology
Balkan Society and Folklore
Feminism and Ethnography
Anthropology and Popular Culture
Ethnographic Research: Epistemology, Methods, Ethics
Anthropological Linguistics
Arts and Administration Core Courses
Cultural Programming
Community Cultural Development
Cultural Policy
German and Scandinavian Core Courses
Seminar: [Topic] (Magic, Uncanny, Surrealistic and Fantastic Tales )
Translations-Transformations (Fairy Tales on the Move)
Music Core Courses
Introduction to Ethnomusicology
Musical Instruments of the World
MUS 557
Celtic Music
MUS 560
Popular Musics in the African Diaspora
Electives16
Select courses from the folklore core or outside that bolster areas of student expertise
Thesis or Terminal Project
FLR 503Thesis 39
or FLR 609 Terminal Project
1

Or other fieldwork course approved by advising committee.

2

12 of the 28 credits must be earned in folklore (FLR) courses.

3

Students complete a thesis or terminal project based on original research. The number of thesis or terminal project credits that a candidate may complete has no maximum, although only 9 credits count toward the degree. 

Courses are chosen in consultation with the student’s advising committee. Students may substitute courses not listed above to fulfill requirements with the approval of their advising committee.

Master of Arts: Public Folklore Track (63 credits)

Required Courses
FLR 550Folklore in the Public Sector4
FLR 681History and Theory of Folklore Research5
FLR 684Folklore Fieldwork Seminar 15
AAD 521Cultural Programming4
Interdisciplinary Core Courses
Select 20 credits from the following courses: 220
Folklore Core Courses
Seminar: [Topic] (Video Production)
Folklore and Religion
Folk Art and Material Culture
Mythology and Modern Fantasy Fiction
Folklore and Foodways
African Folklore
Folklore and Gender
Folklore and Mythology of the British Isles
Film and Folklore
Anglo-American Ballad and Folk Song
Anthropology Core Courses
ANTH 511
Performance, Politics, and Folklore
Jewish Folklore and Ethnology
Balkan Society and Folklore
Feminism and Ethnography
Anthropology and Popular Culture
Ethnographic Research: Epistemology, Methods, Ethics
Anthropological Linguistics
Arts and Administration Core Courses
Cultural Policy
German and Scandinavian Core Courses
Seminar: [Topic] (Magic, Uncanny, Surrealistic, and Fantastic Tales )
Translations-Transformations (Fairy Tales on the Move)
Music Core Courses
Introduction to Ethnomusicology
Musical Instruments of the World
MUS 557
Celtic Music
MUS 560
Popular Musics in the African Diaspora
Electives12
Select courses from the folklore core or outside that bolster specialization areas
Internship
FLR 604Internship: [Topic] 34
Thesis or Terminal Project
FLR 503Thesis 49
or FLR 609 Terminal Project
1

Or other fieldwork course approved by advising committee.

2

Students may substitute other courses not listed to fulfill requirements with the approval of their advising committee.

3

An internship related to public folklore amounting to 120 clock hours of service on-site, organized through the Folklore Program or the Oregon Folklife Network.

4

The number of thesis or terminal project credits that a candidate may complete has no maximum, although only 9 credits count toward the degree.

Master of Science: Public Folklore Track (63 credits)

Required Courses
FLR 550Folklore in the Public Sector4
FLR 681History and Theory of Folklore Research5
FLR 684Folklore Fieldwork Seminar 15
AAD 521Cultural Programming4
Interdisciplinary Core Courses
Select 20 credits from the following courses: 220
Folklore Core Courses
Seminar: [Topic] (Video Production)
Folklore and Religion
Folk Art and Material Culture
Mythology and Modern Fantasy Fiction
Folklore and Foodways
African Folklore
Folklore and Gender
Folklore and Mythology of the British Isles
Film and Folklore
Anglo-American Ballad and Folk Song
Anthropology Core Courses
ANTH 511
Performance, Politics, and Folklore
Jewish Folklore and Ethnology
Balkan Society and Folklore
Feminism and Ethnography
Anthropology and Popular Culture
Ethnographic Research: Epistemology, Methods, Ethics
Anthropological Linguistics
Arts and Administration Core Courses
Cultural Policy
German and Scandinavian Core Courses
Seminar: [Topic] (Magic, Uncanny, Surrealistic, and Fantastic Tales )
Translations-Transformations (Fairy Tales on the Move)
Music Core Courses
Introduction to Ethnomusicology
Musical Instruments of the World
MUS 557
Celtic Music
MUS 560
Popular Musics in the African Diaspora
Electives12
Select courses from the folklore core or outside that bolster specialization areas
Internship
FLR 604Internship: [Topic] 34
Thesis or Terminal Project
FLR 503Thesis 49
or FLR 609 Terminal Project
1

Or other fieldwork course approved by advising committee.

2

Students may substitute other courses not listed to fulfill requirements with the approval of their advising committee.

3

An internship related to public folklore amounting to 120 clock hours of service on-site, organized through the Folklore Program or the Oregon Folklife Network.

4

The number of thesis or terminal project credits that a candidate may complete has no maximum, although only 9 credits count toward the degree.

Additional Courses

Consult the program’s website or members of its faculty each term for special offerings that fulfill degree requirements. Visit the Folklore Program website for a list of additional approved courses.

Other undergraduate and graduate courses with related subject matter may be applied to folklore certificate programs by arrangement with the instructors and the folklore director. For a list of these courses, visit the program website.

Courses

Course usage information

FLR 198. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 225. Voices of Africa. 4 Credits.

Novels, music, dance, dress, paintings, films, and cartoons serve as a primary sources from which to learn about the diversity and vivacity of contemporary African peoples.

Course usage information

FLR 235. Folklore and the Supernatural. 4 Credits.

Introduces the study of beliefs about the supernatural by examining diverse approaches to the description and analysis of belief traditions and religious culture.

Course usage information

FLR 236. Magic in the Middle Ages. 4 Credits.

Examines how medieval culture defined magic and how the exploration of magic led to the beginnings of science. Analyzes the practices of medieval western Europe, particularly Britain.

Course usage information

FLR 245. Folklore and the Pacific Northwest. 4 Credits.

A survey exploring cultural expression of customary, verbal, and material folklore found in the Pacific Northwest, with a consideration of ethnic and geographical variation.

Course usage information

FLR 250. Introduction to Folklore. 4 Credits.

The process and genres of traditional (i.e., folk) patterning; the relations between these forms of expression and other arts, especially English and American literature.

Course usage information

FLR 255. Folklore and United States Popular Culture. 4 Credits.

Explores the relationship between folklore and popular culture, with special emphasis on the analysis of legends, myths, icons, stereotypes, heroes, celebrities, rituals, and celebrations.

Course usage information

FLR 320. Car Cultures. 4 Credits.

Examines car customizing and tuning as forms of vernacular art; studies the environmental impacts of automobiles, the history of the industry, and the peculiarities of drivers' behavior. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

FLR 350. Folklore and the Bible. 4 Credits.

Studies readings of the Judeo-Christian Bible in connection with mythological and traditional contexts and meanings from ancient times to the present. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

FLR 365. Folklore Research Methods. 4 Credits.

Archival and library research skills augmented with fieldwork skills including observation, participation, documentation, interviewing, transcription, and presentation of findings.

Course usage information

FLR 370. Folklore and Sexuality. 4 Credits.

Examines intersections of folklore and sexuality as entry points for discussing social issues of sexual and gender identity, intolerance, and resistance. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

FLR 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 400M. Temporary Multilisted Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 403. Thesis. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-8 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 406. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 411. Folklore and Religion. 4 Credits.

Explores the role of folklore in people's religious lives with particular emphasis on narrative, beliefs, rituals, celebrations, pilgrimage, and ecstatic states.

Course usage information

FLR 413. Folk Art and Material Culture. 4 Credits.

Survey of the research by folklorists on contemporary folk art, material culture, and the aesthetic impulse in everyday life.

Course usage information

FLR 414. Mythology and Modern Fantasy Fiction. 4 Credits.

Examines the folklore and literary sources that inspired writers such as J. R. R Tolkien, Neil Gaiman, and George R. R. Martin and gave rise to modern fantasy fiction. Offered only in summer.

Course usage information

FLR 415. Folklore and Foodways. 4 Credits.

Examines food traditions from a folkloristic perspective, looking at issues such as identity, performance, community, creativity, and innovation. Prereq: junior standing. Offered every second or third year.

Course usage information

FLR 416. African Folklore. 4 Credits.

Examines folklore forms across the African continent to analyze themes of history, identity, aesthetics, gender, class, politics, and globalization. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: junior standing.

Course usage information

FLR 418. Folklore and Gender. 4 Credits.

Examines intersections of folklore and gender and the resulting issues of creativity, social dynamics, feminism, identity politics, and negotiations of power. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: junior standing.

Course usage information

FLR 450. Folklore in the Public Sector. 4 Credits.

Investigates the history of the field of public folklore as well as training students in contemporary practices including fieldwork methods, grant writing, and project development.

Course usage information

FLR 483. Folklore and Mythology of the British Isles. 4 Credits.

Basic folk traditions in the British Isles (e.g., ballads, folktales, legends, myths) and their treatment in the written literature of major British authors.

Course usage information

FLR 485. Film and Folklore. 4 Credits.

The developmental use of film by folklorists. Folklore genres, theories, and fieldwork methods as related to filmmakers' techniques. Analysis includes documentary and ethnodocumentary films.

Course usage information

FLR 491. Anglo-American Ballad and Folk Song. 4 Credits.

Study of popular ballads in the Anglo-American tradition--styles, origins, forms, content, and dissemination. History and influence of popular media.

Course usage information

FLR 500M. Temporary Multilisted Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 503. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 511. Folklore and Religion. 4 Credits.

Explores the role of folklore in people's religious lives with particular emphasis on narrative, beliefs, rituals, celebrations, pilgrimage, and ecstatic states.

Course usage information

FLR 513. Folk Art and Material Culture. 4 Credits.

Survey of the research by folklorists on contemporary folk art, material culture, and the aesthetic impulse in everyday life.

Course usage information

FLR 514. Mythology and Modern Fantasy Fiction. 4 Credits.

Examines the folklore and literary sources that inspired writers such as J. R. R Tolkien, Neil Gaiman, and George R. R. Martin and gave rise to modern fantasy fiction. Offered only in summer.

Course usage information

FLR 515. Folklore and Foodways. 4 Credits.

Examines food traditions from a folkloristic perspective, looking at issues such as identity, performance, community, creativity, and innovation. Prereq: junior standing. Offered every second or third year.

Course usage information

FLR 516. African Folklore. 4 Credits.

Examines folklore forms across the African continent to analyze themes of history, identity, aesthetics, gender, class, politics, and globalization.

Course usage information

FLR 518. Folklore and Gender. 4 Credits.

Examines intersections of folklore and gender and the resulting issues of creativity, social dynamics, feminism, identity politics, and negotiations of power. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

FLR 550. Folklore in the Public Sector. 4 Credits.

Investigates the history of the field of public folklore as well as training students in contemporary practices including fieldwork methods, grant writing, and project development.

Course usage information

FLR 583. Folklore and Mythology of the British Isles. 4 Credits.

Basic folk traditions in the British Isles (e.g., ballads, folktales, legends, myths) and their treatment in the written literature of major British authors.

Course usage information

FLR 585. Film and Folklore. 4 Credits.

The developmental use of film by folklorists. Folklore genres, theories, and fieldwork methods as related to filmmakers' techniques. Analysis includes documentary and ethnodocumentary films.

Course usage information

FLR 591. Anglo-American Ballad and Folk Song. 4 Credits.

Study of popular ballads in the Anglo-American tradition--styles, origins, forms, content, and dissemination. History and influence of popular media.

Course usage information

FLR 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 609. Terminal Project. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FLR 681. History and Theory of Folklore Research. 5 Credits.

Examines nature of scholarly inquiry, research questions, and techniques. Historic orientation with emphasis on ideological development of folkloristics from its beginnings to the present.

Course usage information

FLR 684. Folklore Fieldwork Seminar. 5 Credits.

Students conceptualize and execute a fieldwork project while developing practical skills in proposal writing, observation, interviewing, analysis, documentation, and presentation.