German and Scandinavian

http://uoregon.edu/~gerscan

Dorothee Ostmeier, Department Head
541-346-4245
202 Friendly Hall
1250 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-1250

The Department of German and Scandinavian offers a range of courses and degree programs, from instruction in beginning languages through the study of the literature and cultures of German-, Danish-, Finnish-, Swedish-, and Norwegian-speaking countries. Students may earn a bachelor of arts (BA) degree in German with a focus on language, literature, and culture, interdisciplinary German studies, or Scandinavian; master of arts (MA) and doctor of philosophy (PhD) degrees are available in German. The Department of German and Scandinavian offers the only program in the state of Oregon that grants a PhD in German.

Scholarships

The Department of German and Scandinavian administers scholarships for undergraduate and graduate students majoring in German.

  • The Herbert Merker Scholarship is awarded annually to the benefit of one or more undergraduate majors
  • The Plant German Undergraduate Scholarship benefits at least one deserving undergraduate annually
  • The Philip and Teresa Hansen Germanic Languages and Literatures Scholarship Fund award is given annually to two students nominated by members of the faculty
  • The Beth Maveety Study Abroad Scholarship is awarded each year to a student for continued study in Germany; preference is given to students who intend to teach German
  • The Anderson Scandinavian Studies Award is granted to promising undergraduate or graduate students for studying in Scandinavian countries
  • The Leona M. Kail Scholarship is awarded every other year to one or two outstanding undergraduate students with financial need
  • The Roger Nicholls Memorial Endowment Fund award is granted to an outstanding beginning graduate student in German
  • The Philip Hansen Graduate Fellowship in German and Scandinavian is awarded annually to a graduate student nominated by the faculty
  • The Astrid M. Williams Fellowship is awarded to advanced doctoral students of German nominated by the faculty

Please contact departmental advisors for more information.

European Studies Minor

Some courses may be applied to the European studies minor. See the European Studies section of this catalog for more information.

Study Abroad

Germany

The department encourages students of German to study in Germany on one of the University of Oregon–sponsored exchange programs—the yearlong Baden-Württemberg program or the spring intensive German-language program in Tübingen. Study for one or two months in summer is also available in Berlin. Students may also study for one or two terms in Vienna. We encourage all students to study abroad or to attend summer school programs such as the Deutsche Sommerschule am Pazifik in Portland.

Students in University of Oregon overseas study programs enroll in courses with subject codes that are unique to individual programs. Special course numbers are reserved for overseas study. See Study Abroad in the Supplementary Academic Programming section of this catalog.

For more information, students should consult departmental representatives and the International Affairs office. Students working toward a German major or minor must consult an undergraduate advisor before beginning any study abroad program in order to ensure that departmental requirements can be met.

German majors with a focus in language, literature, and culture must complete six courses on the UO campus, two of which must be 400-level courses with the GER subject code, unless they intend to graduate in absentia while enrolled through the Baden-Württemberg program. German majors with a focus on interdisciplinary German Studies must complete three courses on the UO campus, one of which must have a GER subject code.

Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden

Students in Scandinavian are strongly encouraged to spend a year studying in an exchange program at Denmark’s International Study Program in Copenhagen, at Copenhagen Business School, at Aalborg University in Denmark, at the University of Tampere in Finland, at the University of Bergen or the University of Oslo in Norway, or at the University of Uppsala in Sweden. For more information, consult departmental advisors in Scandinavian.

Faculty

Susan C. Anderson, professor (20th- and 21st-century German and Austrian literature, literary theory, gender and diversity). BA, 1978, North Carolina, Asheville; MA, 1981, PhD, 1985, North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (1986)

Corinne Bayerl, instructor (16th- to early 18th-century French and German literature and philosophy; gender questions; history of pedagogy). MA, 1996, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, PhD, 2014, Chicago. (2012)

Sonja Boos, associate professor (19th- through 21st-century German literature, culture, and film; critical thought). MA, 1997, Heinrich-Heine Universität Düsseldorf; MA, 2004, PhD, 2008, Princeton. (2013)

Kenneth S. Calhoon, professor (Enlightenment, Romanticism, literary and film history and theory). See Comparative Literature.

Amanda E. Doxtater, instructor (cinema, Scandinavian literature and drama, Swedish language). BA, 1997, MA, 2003, Washington (Seattle); PhD, 2012, California, Berkeley. (2012)

D. Gantt Gurley, assistant professor (Scandinavian literature and folklore, Old Norse literature, Jewish studies). BA, 1994, Bard College; MA, 2002, PhD, 2007, California, Berkeley. (2009)

Martin Klebes, associate professor (18th- to 21st- century literature, philosophy, critical thought). PhD, 2003, Northwestern. (2007)

Jeffrey S. Librett, professor (literature since 1750, theoretical discourses, Jewish studies). BA, 1979, Yale; MA, 1981, Columbia; PhD, 1989, Cornell. (2004)

Katharina Loew, assistant professor (cinema, German studies). MA, 1999, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat München; PhD, 2011, Chicago. (2011)

Dawn A. Marlan, lecturer (German and European literature and culture from 1700 forward; modernist novel). BA, 1989, Bennington College; MA, 1991, PhD, 2000, Chicago. (2004)

Alexander Mathäs, professor (18th- to 20th-century German literature, literary theory, cultural theory). Staatsexamen, 1981, Tübingen; MA, 1984, Oregon; PhD, 1990, Texas, Austin. (1996)

Dorothee Ostmeier, professor (18th- and 20th-century literature, culture, philosophy). Staatsexamen, 1984, MA, 1985, Ruhr; PhD, 1993, Johns Hopkins. (2001)

Michael Stern, associate professor (Nietzsche, Kierkegaard,19th-century Scandinavian literature). BA, 1993, MA, 1995, PhD, 2000, California, Berkeley. (2001)

Matthias Vogel, senior instructor (second-language acquisition); language coordinator, German language programs; coordinator, German Global Scholars. BA, 1993, Johannes Gutenberg, Mainz; MA, 1996, Oregon. (2011)

Emeriti

Walther L. Hahn, professor emeritus. Dip., Teachers College, Berlin, 1949; MA, 1954, Rice; PhD, 1956, Texas, Austin. (1961)

James R. McWilliams, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1951, MA, 1957, PhD, 1963, California, Berkeley. (1960)

Helmut R. Plant, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1957, Fairmont; MA, 1961, PhD, 1964, Cincinnati. (1966)

Karla L. Schultz, professor emerita. BA, 1967, Alma; MA, 1968, Washington (Seattle); MA, 1980, PhD, 1984, Oregon. (1987)

Ingrid A. Weatherhead, senior instructor emerita. BA, 1950, MA, 1951, Puget Sound. (1962)

Virpi Zuck, professor emerita. BA, 1964, MA, 1965, University of Helsinki; PhD, 1977, Wisconsin, Madison. (1974)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

The Department of German and Scandinavian offers a bachelor of arts (BA) degree with a major in German. Students may focus their studies by emphasizing German language, literature, and culture; Scandinavian; or German studies. The Department of German and Scandinavian also offers a combined bachelor of arts–master of arts degree in German. In this program, students complete the requirements for both degrees in a total of five years. For further information, see the Graduate Studies section.

Preparation

German majors and minors must demonstrate German language proficiency through successful completion of second-year German or a placement examination. Incoming students with experience in German must take the placement examination during registration week to help with proper placement.

Careers

A bachelor’s degree in German enables students to pursue careers in college and secondary teaching, international business, government and foreign service, tourism, and translation and editorial work. Recent graduates of the department have been successful applicants to schools of law and business as well as graduate programs in German, Scandinavian, linguistics, history, comparative literature, and international studies. Majors planning to pursue graduate studies are encouraged to write an honors thesis.

Major Requirements

Students intending to major with a focus in German language, literature, and culture or interdisciplinary German studies must first acquire proficiency in the German language, typically demonstrated by satisfactory completion of the third term of Second-Year German (GER 203) or the second term of Intensive Second-Year German (GER 205), or a placement exam. Thereafter, students may begin to take upper-division courses taught in German.

The department does not accept a grade of C– or lower in any course used to fulfill requirements for a major in German.

German Language, Literature, and Culture Focus

Five upper-division German language courses20
Seven upper-division German literature and culture courses28
German advising conference workshop 11
Total Credits49
1

May be taken pass/no pass.

Of the requirements listed in the first two rows, the following must apply:

  • Six courses must be taken in the UO Department of German and Scandinavian
  • At least four courses must be 400-level courses with the GER subject code, two of which must be taken at the University of Oregon; one of the two must be in literature, culture, or theory
  • One course may be taken pass/no pass
  • Only one course taught in English may count toward the major

The following courses may not be used to satisfy major requirements:

GER 199Special Studies: [Topic]NaN
GER 327–329German for Reading Knowledge12
GER 405Reading and Conference: [Topic]NaN
GER 406Special Problems: [Topic]NaN
GER 408Workshop: [Topic]NaN
GER 409Practicum: [Topic] 1NaN
1

 4 credits of Practicum: Teaching Internship (GER 409) will satisfy a requirement for the major or minor.

Since all courses are not offered every year, plans should be made well in advance so that students can take prerequisites for 400-level courses. Specific questions should be addressed to departmental undergraduate German advisors.

Scandinavian Focus

Due to a lack of funding, the department is currently unable to offer courses in Danish, Finnish, and Norwegian.

One topical upper-division course from related field (advisor approved)4
Three upper-division courses in one Scandinavian language or equivalent 112
Eight upper-division Scandinavian literature and culture courses 232
German advising conference workshop 31
Total Credits49
1

If upper-division Scandinavian language courses are not offered, the student may earn credit through

  • successfully completing third-year language courses abroad
  • successfully completing the study of a related or relevant language (German, Latin, French)
  • successfully completing a study of Old Norse
  • substituting three additional upper-division Scandinavian courses

Please see advisor for guidance.

2

Two of the eight courses may be culture and civilization courses.

3

May be taken pass/no pass.


Of the requirements listed above, the following must apply:

  • Three courses must be taken in the UO Department of German and Scandinavian
  • One course may be taken pass/no pass

Proficiency in a Scandinavian language is required, demonstrated either by evaluation by the Scandinavian advisor or by successful completion, with grades of mid-C or better, of the final terms of Second-Year Finnish, Second-Year Danish, Second-Year Norwegian, or Second-Year Swedish (SWED 203). Students who want to study in Denmark, Finland, Norway, or Sweden should plan their course work carefully in consultation with a departmental undergraduate advisor in Scandinavian.

German Studies Focus

The German studies focus combines advanced language training and German literature courses in an interdisciplinary program that includes courses in history, philosophy, political science, art history, music, religious studies, and Judaic studies. The focus is described in the German Studies section of this catalog.

Honors

To earn a bachelor of arts degree with departmental honors, a student must maintain at least a 3.50 grade point average (GPA) and write an honors essay or thesis approved by the departmental honors committee for 4 credits in Thesis (GER 403).

Minor in German

The German minor correlates well with studies that have an international or European concentration. It is particularly useful for students of international studies, international business, European history, medieval studies, sociology, political science, journalism, linguistics, art history, music history, other languages, theater, and related fields.

Seven upper-division German courses 128
Total Credits28
1

May include courses in language, literature, or culture. Only one course taught in English may be applied to the minor. No courses from other departments count toward the minor in German. Grades of at least mid-C or P (pass) must be earned in all courses used to satisfy requirements for the minor. One course may be taken pass/no pass. At least 12 credits must be taken in the UO Department of German and Scandinavian.

The following courses may not be use to satisfy minor requirements:

GER 199Special Studies: [Topic]NaN
GER 327–329German for Reading Knowledge12
GER 405Reading and Conference: [Topic]NaN
GER 406Special Problems: [Topic]NaN
GER 408Workshop: [Topic]NaN

Minor in Scandinavian

The Scandinavian minor correlates well with studies that have an international or European concentration. It is particularly useful for students of international business, European history, sociology, political science, theater arts, and art history.

Three upper-division language courses or equivalent in one Scandinavian language12
Three upper-division Scandinavian literature courses 112
Upper-division Scandinavian culture course4
Total Credits28
1

If upper-division Scandinavian language courses are not offered, the student may earn credit through

  • successfully completing third-year language courses abroad
  • successfully completing the study of a related or relevant language (German, Latin, French)
  • successfully completing a study of Old Norse
  • substituting three additional upper-division Scandinavian courses

Please see advisor for guidance.

Grades of at least mid-C or P (pass) must be earned to satisfy requirements for the minor. One course may be taken pass/no pass. At least three courses (12 credits) must be taken in the UO Department of German and Scandinavian.

The minor requires proficiency in a Scandinavian language, demonstrated either by evaluation by the Scandinavian advisor or by successful completion, with grades of mid-C or better, of the final terms of Second-Year Finnish, Second-Year Danish, Second-Year Norwegian, or Second-Year Swedish (SWED 203).

Specific questions about the Scandinavian minor should be addressed to departmental undergraduate advisors in Scandinavian.

Minor in German Studies

The minor in interdisciplinary German studies is described in in the German Studies section of of this catalog.

General-Education Requirements

The Department of German and Scandinavian offers many courses, including several taught in English, that satisfy university general-education requirements. See the Group Requirements and Multicultural Requirement sections of this catalog under Bachelor's Degree Requirements.

Kindergarten through Secondary Teaching Careers

Students who complete the BA degree with a major in German are eligible to apply for the College of Education’s fifth-year licensure program in middle-secondary teaching, or the fifth-year licensure program to become an elementary teacher. More information is available from the department’s education advisors; see also the College of Education section of this catalog.

Some German courses may be applied to requirements for the certificate in second-language acquisition and teaching. See the Linguistics section of this catalog for a description of the certificate. More information is available from department advisors.

Graduate Studies

The graduate program in German offers the master of arts (MA) in German, either through a regular two-year program or through a combined BA-MA program that enables students to complete the requirements for both the BA and the MA in German in five years. The program also offers the doctor of philosophy (PhD) degree in German, for which applicants may apply either with a BA or an MA already earned. The requirements for the PhD include one year of graded course work past the MA level and a written dissertation. The MA degree prepares students for teaching German language and culture up through the secondary-school level (in conjunction with teacher certification), while the PhD degree, as the highest degree in the field, is generally expected for an academic career involving both research and teaching.

The graduate curriculum acquaints students with the history of German letters (with a primary focus on modernity since the enlightenment), places this history in a European context, and provides tools for a critical analysis of the literary, theoretical, and cinematic discourses involved. The program encourages comparative, theoretically oriented work.

Core Curriculum

Students take one course each term. These courses are grouped according to common themes to give the program a topical and critical coherence. Core courses are paired with seminars of related or complementary content, and students are encouraged to explore connections between courses.

In the first year, core courses address a specific genre (narrative, drama, and lyric). While their content may vary with the instructor, they are intended to present in general terms the history of the genre itself and of critical thinking about that genre. In the second year, core courses have less traditional themes and present a broader concept of textuality.

GER 621Narrative4
GER 622Drama4
GER 623Lyric4
GER 624Critical and Philosophical Prose 14
GER 625Translations-Transformations 24
GER 690Literary Studies: [Topic] 34
1

Acquaints students with important aspects of German philosophical discourse since Kant.

2

Presents the theory and practice of translation. "Transformations" is added to suggest that translation is not limited to written texts (e.g., the sister arts, literature into film).

3

Various topics in research methods, literary theory, history of German literature, and advanced methodology.

Beyond course work, the program features close mentoring, including guidance for developing portfolio papers that expand on writing done for courses, and, at the PhD level, a dissertation-writing colloquium in which students and faculty members join in responding to ongoing dissertation work by students in the program.

Students should consult an appropriate advisor in the German and Scandinavian department for information about the MA degree program that emphasizes teaching German. Information and application materials are available on the department website.

Graduate Specialization in Translation Studies

Students may choose to complete a graduate specialization in translation studies. Translation studies examines the theory, description, and practice of translation, interpretation, and localization between languages and language-users. The specialization offers graduate students the opportunity to receive recognition for work in this complex academic discipline. For requirements, visit translationstudies.uoregon.edu/graduate-specialization.

Courses

Course usage information

DANE 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

DANE 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

DANE 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

DANE 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

DANE 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

DANE 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

FINN 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

GER 101. First-Year German. 5 Credits.

Provides a thorough grammatical foundation and an elementary reading knowledge of German as well as an understanding of the spoken language. Sequence.

Course usage information

GER 102. First-Year German. 5 Credits.

Provides a thorough grammatical foundation and an elementary reading knowledge of German as well as an understanding of the spoken language.
Prereq: GER 101 or GER 104.

Course usage information

GER 103. First-Year German. 5 Credits.

Provides a thorough grammatical foundation and an elementary reading knowledge of German as well as an understanding of the spoken language.
Prereq: GER 102.

Course usage information

GER 104. Intensive First-Year German. 7 Credits.

Covers the same work as GER 101, 102, 103. Sequence with GER 105. Offered only during summer session.

Course usage information

GER 196. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GER 198. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GER 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GER 201. Second-Year German. 4 Credits.

Grammar and composition, reading selections from representative authors, conversation. Sequence.
Prereq: GER 103 or 105 or equivalent.

Course usage information

GER 202. Second-Year German. 4 Credits.

Grammar and composition, reading selections from representative authors, conversation.
Prereq: GER 201 or GER 204.

Course usage information

GER 203. Second-Year German. 4 Credits.

Grammar and composition, reading selections from representative authors, conversation.
Prereq: GER 202.

Course usage information

GER 204. Intensive Second-Year German. 6 Credits.

Covers the same work as GER 201, 202, 203. Sequence with GER 205. Offered only during summer session.
Prereq: GER 103, 105, or equivalent.

Course usage information

GER 205. Intensive Second-Year German. 6 Credits.

Covers the same work as GER 201, 202, 203. Sequence with GER 204. Offered only during summer session.
Prereq: GER 202, 204, or equivalent.

Course usage information

GER 206. Law in Literature. 4 Credits.

Introduction to German literature and key concepts of Germany's legal tradition with a focus on the connection between legal codes and their representations in fiction.

Course usage information

GER 220M. From Kierkegaard to Kafka. 4 Credits.

Survey of the existential tradition in German and Scandinavian literature, philosophy, drama, and film. Historical and conceptual developments are considered, from Kierkegaard to Kafka. Taught in English. Multilisted with SCAN 220M.

Course usage information

GER 221. Postwar Germany: Nation Divided. 4 Credits.

Introduction to literary and cultural movements of public dissent, including 1960s student revolutions, in postwar Germany. Conducted in English.

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GER 222. Voices of Dissent in Germany. 4 Credits.

Key debates in German culture, including the adequate representation of the Holocaust, literature in society, and the roles of ethnic and gender identities within the nation. Conducted in English.

Course usage information

GER 223. Germany: A Multicultural Society. 4 Credits.

Examines the multiethnic complexities of German, Austrian, and/or Swiss societies through the writings of African, Turkish, or Jewish Germans. Period of focus varies. Conducted in English.

Course usage information

GER 250. The Culture of Money. 4 Credits.

Explores ideas about money, value, and exchange in German-speaking cultures from selected moments in modern history through readings of literature, philosophy, and the arts. Series with GER 251, GER 252.

Course usage information

GER 251. Sexuality. 4 Credits.

Examines discourses on sexuality (e.g., sexual norms, gender roles, and divergences from them) in modern German, Austrian, and Swiss-German contexts through literature, essays, and films. Series with GER 250, GER 252.

Course usage information

GER 252. War, Violence, Trauma. 4 Credits.

Examines works of literature, thought, art, music, and film on subjects of war, violence, and trauma in German and Austrian cultural history during one or more selected postmedieval epochs. Series with GER 250, GER 251.

Course usage information

GER 311. Intermediate Language Training. 4 Credits.

Extensive practice in speaking and writing German; complex grammatical structures in writing.
Prereq: GER 203, GER 205, or equivalent.

Course usage information

GER 312. Intermediate Language Training. 4 Credits.

Extensive practice in speaking and writing German; complex grammatical structures in writing.
Prereq: GER 203, GER 205, or equivalent.

Course usage information

GER 313. Intermediate Language Training. 4 Credits.

Extensive practice in speaking and writing German; complex grammatical structures in writing. Option during 313 to take the Zertifikat Deutsch exam.
Prereq: GER 312.

Course usage information

GER 317. Study in Germany. 4 Credits.

Intensive grammar review in preparation for German exchange programs and upper-division German courses. Introduces contemporary ideas about German culture, history, architecture through journals and magazines.
Pre- or coreq: GER 203 or equivalent.

Course usage information

GER 327. German for Reading Knowledge. 4 Credits.

Intensive practice in grammar; reading texts in the student's own field. Primarily for graduate students in other disciplines; recommended for students who want extra training in translation. Sequence GER 328, GER 329.

Course usage information

GER 328. German for Reading Knowledge. 4 Credits.

Intensive practice in grammar; reading texts in the student's own field. Primarily for graduate students in other disciplines; recommended for students who want extra training in translation. Sequence GER 327, GER 329.
Prereq: GER 327.

Course usage information

GER 340. Introduction to German Culture and Society. 4 Credits.

Writings by such figures as Kant, Marx, Freud, and Weber. The emergence of Germany as a cultural and political entity explored through literature, film, and art. Readings, discussion, and written assignments in German. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: GER 311.

Course usage information

GER 341. Introduction to German Culture and Society. 4 Credits.

Writings by such figures as Kant, Marx, Freud, and Weber. The German crisis of modernization.Readings, discussion, and written assignments in German. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: GER 311.

Course usage information

GER 350. Genres in German Literature. 4 Credits.

Studies on such genres in German literature as Novelle, 20th-century drama, political poetry. No knowledge of German required; readings and discussions in English.

Course usage information

GER 351. Diversity in Germany. 4 Credits.

Examines the social construction of identity in German literature and culture. Addresses topics of plural voices and tolerance in German-speaking cultures. Topics vary. Conducted in English.

Course usage information

GER 352. Authors in German Literature. 4 Credits.

Representative works by writers such as Lessing, Schiller, Hoffmann, Brentano, Droste-Hulshoff, Kafka, Fleisser, Brecht, and Nietzsche. No knowledge of German required; readings and discussions in English.

Course usage information

GER 354. German Gender Studies. 4 Credits.

Student oral presentations and written papers on such topics as men and women writers of German romanticism, mothers and daughters in German literature, comparison of men and women dramatists. No knowledge of German required; readings and discussions in English.

Course usage information

GER 355. German Cinema: History, Theory, Practice. 4 Credits.

In-depth analysis of various facets of German cinema. Topics include film and the Third Reich, cinema and technology, German filmmakers in American exile, German New Wave. Conducted in English.

Course usage information

GER 356. German Fairy Tales. 4 Credits.

The German fairy tale in historical and theoretical context, from the Brothers Grimm and romantic tales to adaptations by Tchaikovsky and Sendak. Taught in English.

Course usage information

GER 357. Nature, Culture, and the Environment. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the contributions German writers, philosophers, scientists, and artists have made to changing notions of nature and its supposed opposition toculture. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

GER 360. Introduction to German Literature: Poetry, Plays, Prose. 4 Credits.

Introduction to textual analysis--poetry, plays, and prose from 1800 to the present--in the context of major literary movements (romanticism, realism, modernism) and their social determinants. Focus on genre: poetry, plays, and prose.
Prereq: GER 311.

Course usage information

GER 361. Introduction to German Literature: Literary Movements. 4 Credits.

Introduction to textual analysis--poetry, plays, and prose from 1800 to the present--in the context of major literary movements (romanticism, realism, modernism) and their social determinants. Focus on literary movements.
Prereq: GER 311.

Course usage information

GER 362. Introduction to German Literature: Interpretive Models. 4 Credits.

Introduction to textual analysis--poetry, plays, and prose from 1800 to the present--in the context of major literary movements (romanticism, realism, modernism) and their social determinants. Focus on interpretive models.
Prereq: GER 311.

Course usage information

GER 366. Themes in German Literature. 4 Credits.

Significant literary texts organized by theme--crime and society, travels and explorations, nature and technology, relationships between the sexes, the Nazi past.
Prereq: GER 311.

Course usage information

GER 367. Themes in German Literature. 4 Credits.

Significant literary texts organized by theme--crime and society, travels and explorations, nature and technology, relationships between the sexes, the Nazi past.
Prereq: GER 311.

Course usage information

GER 368. Themes in German Literature. 4 Credits.

Significant literary texts organized by theme--crime and society, travels and explorations, nature and technology, relationships between the sexes, the Nazi past.
Prereq: GER 311.

Course usage information

GER 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

New topics or approaches appropriate for third-year German proficiency level. Content varies; focus may be on various aspects of German language, literature, or culture and civilization. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: GER 311.

Course usage information

GER 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GER 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GER 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GER 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GER 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable. A recent topic is Experimental Poetry.

Course usage information

GER 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GER 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GER 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics are Doppelganger and Nietzsche.

Course usage information

GER 411. Advanced Language Training. 4 Credits.

Constant practice in speaking and writing with emphasis on complex syntactic structures as well as idiomatic nuances in German. Grammar.
Prereq: GER 311, 312, 313.

Course usage information

GER 412. Advanced Language Training. 4 Credits.

Constant practice in speaking and writing with emphasis on complex syntactic structures as well as idiomatic nuances in German. Writing.
Prereq: GER 311, 312, 313.

Course usage information

GER 413. Advanced Language Training. 4 Credits.

Constant practice in speaking and writing with emphasis on complex syntactic structures as well as idiomatic nuances in German. Speaking.
Prereq: GER 311, 312, 313.

Course usage information

GER 425. Play Performance: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Extensive practice in effective oral communication with emphasis on correct pronunciation. Reading of the play and scene rehearsals in class; public performance at end of term. Repeatable.
Prereq: GER 203, GER 205, or equivalent.

Course usage information

GER 440. German Culture and Society: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Cultural and sociopolitical aspects of Germany. Typical topics are the cultural history of the German forest, gender and terrorism, women and German film, peace movements. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: one upper-division course GER literature or culture.

Course usage information

GER 460. German Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Representative writers (e.g., Lessing, Heine, Kafka, Brecht, Bachmann, or Wolf) or pervasive themes (e.g., peace movements, art and illusion, family and society, history and literature, the political imagination). Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: one upper-division course GER literature or culture.

Course usage information

GER 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GER 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable. A recent topic is Experimental Poetry.

Course usage information

GER 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

GER 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics are Doppelganger and Nietzsche.

Course usage information

GER 540. German Culture and Society: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Cultural and sociopolitical aspects of Germany. Typical topics are the cultural history of the German forest, gender and terrorism, women and German film, peace movements. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

GER 560. German Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Representative writers (e.g., Lessing, Heine, Kafka, Brecht, Bachmann, or Wolf) or pervasive themes (e.g., peace movements, art and illusion, family and society, history and literature, the political imagination). Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: one upper-division course GER literature or culture.

Course usage information

GER 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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GER 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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GER 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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GER 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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GER 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. A recent topic is Weimar Modernisms.

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GER 608. Colloquium: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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GER 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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GER 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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GER 621. Narrative. 4 Credits.

Analysis and theory of narrative texts. Repeatable when topic changes.

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GER 622. Drama. 4 Credits.

Analysis and theory of dramatic texts. Repeatable when topic changes.

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GER 623. Lyric. 4 Credits.

Analysis and theory of lyric texts. Repeatable when topic changes.

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GER 624. Critical and Philosophical Prose. 4 Credits.

Examines important aspects of German philosophy. Repeatable when topic changes.

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GER 625. Translations-Transformations. 4 Credits.

Presents the theory and practice of translation and other transformation media (e.g., the sister arts, literature into film). Repeatable when topic changes.

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GER 690. Literary Studies: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Research methods, literary theory, history of German literature, and advanced methodology. Typical topics include contemporary theory, major German critics, literature and nonliterary forms. Repeatable when topic changes.

Courses

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NORW 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

NORW 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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NORW 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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NORW 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

NORW 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

NORW 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

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SCAN 196. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SCAN 198. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SCAN 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SCAN 220M. From Kierkegaard to Kafka. 4 Credits.

Survey of the existential tradition in German and Scandinavian literature, philosophy, drama, and film. Historical and conceptual developments are considered, from Kierkegaard to Kafka. Taught in English. Multilisted with GER 220M.

Course usage information

SCAN 251. Text and Interpretation. 4 Credits.

Introduction to textual analysis; explores the relationship between experience, description, and identity through the reading and viewing of Scandinavian literature and film. Taught in English.

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SCAN 259. Vikings through the Icelandic Sagas. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the social, political, and cultural expressions of Viking society through the Sagas, the unique prose narratives of medieval Iceland. Conducted in English.

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SCAN 315. Nordic Cinema. 4 Credits.

Examines cinematic culture in the Nordic countries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Includes works by Ingmar Bergman and the Danish group Dogma 95. Taught in English.

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SCAN 316. History of Cinema. 4 Credits.

A survey of Nordic cinema from the silent era to the present. Films will be viewed and analyzed within their aesthetic and historical contexts. Taught in English. Offered alternate years.

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SCAN 317. Directors, Movements, and Manifestos. 4 Credits.

A directed study of specific directors, movements, and manifestos from the Nordic cinematic tradition. Taught in English. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

SCAN 325. Constructions versus Constrictions of Identity. 4 Credits.

Explores the notion of regional, ethnic, gender, and class identity in Scandinavian texts and culture. Topics include immigrant-emigrant experience, lore of the Arctic, folklore, Finland-Swedish writing. Conducted in English.

Course usage information

SCAN 341. Revisions of the Scandinavian Dream. 4 Credits.

Examines development of Scandinavian countries from impoverished kingdoms on the European periphery to modern, multicultural welfare societies. Analyzes patterns in the arts, social and political structures, ecological issues. Taught in English.

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SCAN 343. Norse Mythology. 4 Credits.

Critical evaluation of the religious beliefs in Scandinavia from prehistory through the Viking Age. Taught in English. Offered alternate years.

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SCAN 344. Medieval Hero and Monster. 4 Credits.

Study of medieval Scandinavian and Germanic literature addressing the remarkably fine line drawn between the heroes and monsters depicted. Offered alternate years.

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SCAN 351. Periods in Scandinavian Literature. 4 Credits.

Possible topics are modern breakthrough and modernism in Scandinavian literature. Student discussion, oral presentations, and written papers. Readings and discussions in English.

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SCAN 353. Scandinavian Women Writers. 4 Credits.

Examines social issues, especially gender, in literature written by women from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Primary emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century texts.

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SCAN 354. Genres in Scandinavian Literature. 4 Credits.

Recent topics include short narrative fiction and Scandinavian drama. Student discussion, oral presentations, and written papers. Readings and discussions in English.

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SCAN 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SCAN 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SCAN 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SCAN 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SCAN 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SCAN 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SCAN 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SCAN 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SCAN 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SCAN 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SCAN 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SCAN 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SCAN 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SCAN 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

SWED 101. First-Year Swedish. 5 Credits.

Thorough grammatical foundation in idiomatic Swedish with emphasis on both reading and speaking. Sequence.

Course usage information

SWED 102. First-Year Swedish. 5 Credits.

Thorough grammatical foundation in idiomatic Swedish with emphasis on both reading and speaking.
Prereq: SWED 101.

Course usage information

SWED 103. First-Year Swedish. 5 Credits.

Thorough grammatical foundation in idiomatic Swedish with emphasis on both reading and speaking.
Prereq: SWED 102.

Course usage information

SWED 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SWED 201. Second-Year Swedish. 4 Credits.

Review of grammar; composition, conversation. Readings from contemporary texts in Swedish. Sequence.
Prereq: SWED 103.

Course usage information

SWED 202. Second-Year Swedish. 4 Credits.

Review of grammar; composition, conversation. Readings from contemporary texts in Swedish.
Prereq: SWED 201.

Course usage information

SWED 203. Second-Year Swedish. 4 Credits.

Review of grammar; composition, conversation. Readings from contemporary texts in Swedish.
Prereq: SWED 202.

Course usage information

SWED 301. Third-Year Swedish. 4 Credits.

Historical survey of Sweden, reading of modern Swedish texts, spoken and written practice. Sequence.
Prereq: SWED 203.

Course usage information

SWED 302. Third-Year Swedish. 4 Credits.

Historical survey of Sweden, reading of modern Swedish texts, spoken and written practice.
Prereq: SWED 301.

Course usage information

SWED 303. Third-Year Swedish. 4 Credits.

Historical survey of Sweden, reading of modern Swedish texts, spoken and written practice.
Prereq: SWED 302.

Course usage information

SWED 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SWED 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SWED 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SWED 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SWED 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.