History

David M. Luebke, Department Head
541-346-2394
275 McKenzie Hall

The study of history offers a framework for a liberal education and the background that is essential for understanding the contemporary world. Through analyzing interpretive studies, accounts by witnesses to past events, and historical records, students come to appreciate the complexity of human experience. By examining changes in the past, they develop a broad perspective and the ability to weigh evidence and argument.

 

Faculty

Carlos Aguirre, professor (Latin America). BA, 1986, Lima (Peru); MA, 1990, Peru; PhD, 1996, Minnesota. (1996)

Nathanael Andrade, associate professor (ancient Greece and Rome). BA, 2002, Wesleyan; PhD, 2009, Michigan, Ann Arbor. (2012)

Ina Asim, associate professor (premodern China). MA, 1982, PhD, 1992, Dr. phil. habil., 2001, Wurzburg. (2002)

Lindsay F. Braun, associate professor (Africa). BS, 1994, Eastern Michigan; MA, 1997, Michigan State; PhD, 2008, Rutgers. (2009)

Jamie M. Bufalino, instructor (women and gender in history). BA, 1997, MA, 2001, PhD, 2009, California, Riverside. (2012)

Matthew Dennis, professor (early American cultural and environmental). BA, 1977, California, Irvine; MA, 1979, PhD, 1986, California, Berkeley. (1988)

Alexander Dracobly, senior instructor (modern Europe, military, medical). BA, 1987, Grinnell; MA, 1989, PhD, 1996, Chicago. (1995)

Andrew E. Goble, professor (premodern Japan, medical history, East Asia). BA, 1975, MA, 1981, Queensland; PhD, 1987, Stanford. (1990)

Bryna Goodman, professor (modern China). BA, 1978, Wesleyan; MA, 1982, PhD, 1990, Stanford. (1991)

Jeffrey E. Hanes, associate professor (modern Japan). AB, 1973, Williams; MA, 1978, PhD, 1988, California, Berkeley. (1993)

Robert S. Haskett, professor (Latin America). BA, 1975, California, Long Beach; MA, 1978, PhD, 1985, California, Los Angeles. (1988)

Ellen Herman, professor (modern United States). BA, 1979, Michigan; PhD, 1993, Brandeis. (1997)

Julie Hessler, associate professor (20th-century Russia, Europe). BA, 1988, Yale; MA, 1989, PhD, 1996, Chicago. (1995)

R. Alan Kimball, associate professor (modern Russia). BA, 1961, Kansas; MA, 1963, PhD, 1967, Washington (Seattle). (1967)

David M. Luebke, professor (early modern Europe, Germany). BA, 1983, Nebraska; PhD, 1990, Yale. (1997)

Glenn A. May, professor (Southeast Asia, American foreign relations). BA, 1966, MPhil, 1971, PhD, 1975, Yale. (1983)

John McCole, associate professor (European intellectual, cultural, and social; modern Europe; historiography and theory). BA, 1975, Brown; MA, 1982, PhD, 1988, Boston. (1994)

Randall E. McGowen, professor (modern Britain). BA, 1970, American; MA, 1971, PhD, 1979, Illinois. (1982)

Ian F. McNeely, professor (Europe, the world). AB, 1992, Harvard; MA, 1993, PhD, 1998, Michigan. (2000)

James C. Mohr, Philip H. Knight Professor (19th-century United States). BA, 1965, Yale; MA, 1966, PhD, 1969, Stanford. (1992)

Jeffrey Ostler, Carrie C. Beekman Professor of Northwest and Pacific History (American West). BA, 1979, Utah; MA, 1984, Oregon; PhD, 1990, Iowa. (1990)

George J. Sheridan Jr., associate professor (France, European socioeconomic). BA, 1969, Princeton; MA, 1974, PhD, 1978, Yale. (1976)

Arafaat Valiani, associate professor (South Asia). BFA, 1996, Concordia; MA, 1997, London School of Economics and Political Science; PhD, 2005, Columbia. (2012)

Marsha Weisiger, Julie and Rocky Dixon Chair in US Western History; associate professor (environmental, Native American, American West). BA, 1978, Arizona State; MA, 1991, PhD, 2000, Wisconsin, Madison. (2010)

Julie Weise, associate professor (20th-century United States, modern Mexico, global migration). BA, 2000, MA 2005, MPhil, 2006, PhD, 2009, Yale. (2013)

Lisa Wolverton, professor (medieval Europe). BSFS, 1986, Georgetown; MMS, 1991, PhD, 1997, Notre Dame. (2000)

Reuben Zahler, associate professor (Latin America). BA, 1991, Cornell; MA, 1999, PhD, 2005, Chicago. (2012)

Emeriti

Raymond Birn, professor emeritus. AB, 1956, New York University; MA, 1957, PhD, 1961, Illinois. (1961)

Leslie Decker, professor emeritus. BA, 1951, Maine; MA, 1952, Oklahoma State; PhD, 1961, Cornell. (1969)

Paul S. Holbo, professor emeritus; vice provost emeritus, academic affairs. BA, 1951, Yale; MA, 1955, PhD, 1961, Chicago. (1959)

Jack P. Maddex, professor emeritus. BA, 1963, Princeton; PhD, 1966, North Carolina. (1966)

Mavis Howe Mate, professor emerita. BA, 1956, MA, 1961, Oxford; PhD, 1967, Ohio State. (1974)

John Nicols, professor emeritus. AB, 1966, California, Berkeley; MA, 1968, PhD, 1974, California, Los Angeles. (1980)

Daniel A. Pope, professor emeritus. BA, 1966, Swarthmore; MA, 1968, PhD, 1973, Columbia. (1975)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Participating

Judith R. Baskin, Judaic studies

Robert Bussel, Labor Education and Research Center

Mark Carey, honors college

James D. Fox, library

Ocean Howell, honors college

Vera Keller, honors college

Roxann Prazniak, honors college

Elizabeth Reis, women’s and gender studies

Daniel Rosenberg, honors college

Gretchen Soderlund, journalism and communication

Undergraduate Studies

Students who plan to major in history should include in their high school studies four years of social studies, four years of English, and preparation in a second language. Students who transfer to the university at the end of their sophomore year should have completed a year of college-level history and at least one year of a second language.

Careers

History provides a foundation for careers in teaching, journalism, international endeavors, law, foreign service, business, government, ministry, librarianship, museum and archival work, and historic preservation. Work beyond the bachelor’s degree is required in many of these fields.

Advising and Entering the Major

The Department of History requires students to have formal advising at the time that they enter the major. The advising coordinator assigns each student a faculty advisor who reviews departmental requirements and helps the student develop a plan that directs the course of study and ensures timely completion of the requirements. The faculty advisor is available for periodic review of the program and of progress in the major.

A staff of undergraduate peer advisors is available in the history peer advising office to help majors and prospective majors at any stage of their academic careers. Peer advisors are trained in university and history major requirements, and they are a resource for information about graduate programs in history, careers in history, and history-related activities in the university and the community. Students may obtain a checklist outlining the major in the history office and in the history peer advising office.

Forms and checklists for majors and minors may be found online at history.uoregon.edu/undergraduate/forms.

Bachelor's Degree Requirements

The Department of History offers two undergraduate degrees, a bachelor of arts (BA) and a bachelor of science (BS). Requirements are the same for both.

All history majors, regardless of whether they are earning a BA or BS, must fulfill the second-language requirement associated with the university’s bachelor of arts general-education requirement. They must demonstrate proficiency in a second language either by completing, with a C– or better or P, at least the third term, second year of a second language. History courses that satisfy major requirements must be taken for letter grades. Specific requirements follow:

Bachelor of Arts Requirements

Upper-Division History Courses33
21 credits at the 400 level, including a 5-credit Seminar (HIST 407) 1
8 credits in history before 1800
8 credits in each of three concentration areas selected from a list of six historical fields 2
Additional History Courses 312
Total Credits45
1

No more than 8 credits of Reading and Conference (HIST 405) may be used to fulfill major requirements.

2

Historical fields: 1) Europe, 2) United States, 3) Africa and the Middle East, 4) Asia, 5) Latin America, 6) World

3

Upper or lower division

Additional Requirements

In exceptional circumstances, a term paper written in Colloquium: [Topic] (HIST 408) or in a 400-level course may be expanded into a research paper. Students who have secured approval from the director of undergraduate studies for this option enroll in Reading and Conference: [Topic] (HIST 405) for 2 graded credits. The arrangement for writing a research paper based on the term paper is one that requires not only the approval of the director of undergraduate studies but also the agreement of the instructor in the relevant 400-level course to teach the reading and conference course and to supervise the writing of the research paper. This procedure for writing a research paper does not duplicate the seminar experience. It should not be used to compensate for a student's lack of planning or preparation. It is permitted only when there are strong pedagogical reasons for pursuing it.

A grade point average (GPA) of 2.50 or higher is required in history courses taken at the University of Oregon. A mid-C or better is required in courses taken to fulfill the research paper requirement. Majors who maintain a GPA of 3.50 or better qualify for the history honors track. More information on this option may be found on the department website.

A total of 21 upper-division credits, including three courses numbered 408, 410–499, and all courses taken to fulfill the research paper requirement must be taken at the University of Oregon.

Bachelor of Science Requirements

Upper-Division History Courses33
21 credits at the 400 level, including a 5-credit Seminar (HIST 407) 1
8 credits in history before 1800
8 credits in each of three concentration areas selected from a list of five historical fields 2
Additional History Courses 312
Total Credits45
1

No more than 8 credits of Reading and Conference (HIST 405) may be used to fulfill major requirements.

2

Historical fields: 1) Europe, 2) United States, 3) Africa and the Middle East, 4) Asia, 5) Latin America.

3

Upper or lower division

Additional Requirements

In exceptional circumstances, a term paper written in Colloquium: [Topic] (HIST 408) or in a 400-level course may be expanded into a research paper. Students who have secured approval from the director of undergraduate studies for this option enroll in Reading and Conference: [Topic] (HIST 405) for 2 graded credits. The arrangement for writing a research paper based on the term paper is one that requires not only the approval of the director of undergraduate studies but also the agreement of the instructor in the relevant 400-level course to teach the reading and conference course and to supervise the writing of the research paper. This procedure for writing a research paper does not duplicate the seminar experience. It should not be used to compensate for a student's lack of planning or preparation. It is permitted only when there are strong pedagogical reasons for pursuing it.

A grade point average (GPA) of 2.50 or higher is required in history courses taken at the University of Oregon. A mid-C or better is required in courses taken to fulfill the research paper requirement. Majors who maintain a GPA of 3.50 or better qualify for the history honors track. More information on this option may be found on the department website.

A total of 21 upper-division credits, including three courses numbered 408, 410–499, and all courses taken to fulfill the research paper requirement must be taken at the University of Oregon.

History Honors Program

The honors program provides an opportunity for capable and highly motivated history majors to develop their interests in historical research by writing a thesis during the senior year. To be eligible for admission to the program, students must have completed at least 28 credits in history, of which at least 16 upper-division credits must have been taken at the University of Oregon. The grade point average in all history courses must be 3.50 or better. Students who satisfactorily complete the thesis and related work and fulfill the requirements of the history major are eligible for a bachelor’s degree with honors in history. Information about procedures for admission to the honors program, the course of study, the nature of the thesis, and the oral examination on the thesis may be obtained from the history department staff.

Minor Requirements

These new requirements became effective at the beginning of winter term 2010. Minors who signed up when the previous plan was in force may opt to fulfill the requirements of the 2010 plan, although they must formally declare their intention to do so with the director of undergraduate studies of the Department of History.

At least 20 credits—including at least 8 400-level credits—must be completed at the University of Oregon. Courses in history before 1800 and non-European or non-U.S. history require a grade of C– or better to apply toward the minor requirements. Four of the credits may be completed at the lower division. Specific requirements follow:

History Courses28
24 upper-division credits 1
4 credits in a course on history before 1800
4 upper-division credits in a course that does not focus on either European or United States history
1

12 of the 24 credits must be at the 400 level (three courses from among HIST 408, 410–499).

Additional Requirements

A grade point average (GPA) of 2.50 or higher is required in history courses taken at the University of Oregon.

Advising and Entering the Minor

To declare a minor in history, students must first have a formal advising session with the director of undergraduate studies. The director aids the student in developing and directing a plan of study that ensures timely completion of the requirements.

A staff of undergraduate peer advisors is available in the History Peer Advising Office to help minors and prospective minors at any stage of their academic careers. Peer advisors are trained in university and history minor requirements as well as information on graduate programs, careers, and other history-related activities.

Kindergarten through Secondary Teaching Careers

Students completing a degree with a major in history are eligible to apply for the College of Education’s fifth-year licensure program in middle-secondary teaching in social studies. Students may also apply to the fifth-year licensure program to become an elementary teacher. More information is available from the department’s education advisor, Robert Haskett; see also the College of Education section of this catalog.

Graduate Studies

The department offers graduate instruction leading to the degrees of master of arts (MA) and doctor of philosophy (PhD) specializing in colonial America and the United States, Europe, East and Southeast Asia, Latin America, and Africa.

Admission

Applicants must submit the following items to be considered for admission to the graduate program in history:

  1. A completed UO Graduate Admission Application
  2. Transcripts of all college work
  3. Three letters of recommendation
  4. Scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE)
  5. Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores for international students
  6. A sample of written work and a statement of academic purpose

A number of graduate awards in the form of graduate teaching fellowships are available each year for entering graduate students.

Fields of Study

The primary fields are ancient history, medieval Europe, Europe 1400–1815, Europe since 1789, Russia, colonial America and the United States, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Latin America, and Africa.

Master of Arts Degree Requirements

The department recently adopted new requirements (listed below) for MA students entering in fall 2008 and subsequent years. Students who entered before this date are still subject to the old requirements, which are still available on the department website.

Applicants are expected to have completed an undergraduate degree in the liberal arts with emphasis on history. The MA program is typically completed in two years of full-time study. Before receiving the degree, students must demonstrate competence in a second language.

Students must write a master’s thesis or complete two substantial research papers in the primary field and defend the thesis or research papers in an oral examination.

Major Field Requirement

Students must declare a major field of study, chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor.

Plan of Study

By the end of the first term in the program, students are required to file a plan of study, signed by the advisor, in which they state their major field, list all anticipated course work, and specify their language requirement. The plan of study may be modified later by agreement of both student and advisor. All plans of study are reviewed and approved by the director of graduate studies.

HIST 611Field Readings 15
HIST 612Historical Methods and Writings 25
HIST 615Professional Development 31
HIST 616Graduate Student Conference 41
HIST 507Seminar: [Topic] (two seminars)5
or HIST 607 Seminar: [Topic]
HIST 608Colloquium: [Topic] (two colloquia) 55
1

Completed during the first two terms of the first year. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of (1) an appropriate 500-level course, approved by an advisor, or (2) Colloquium: [Topic] (HIST 608), if equivalent to Field Readings (HIST 611).

2

Taken fall term.

3

Taken winter term.

4

Taken spring term.

5

Student may petition to replace Colloquium: [Topic] (HIST 608) with Colloquium: [Topic] (HIST 508).

Language Requirement

All MA students must demonstrate proficiency in at least one foreign language by passing an exam that tests the ability to read and comprehend a passage of average difficulty drawn from primary sources or the secondary literature. The language exam is offered once each term during the regular academic year.

Advisors must approve the choice of language. MA students whose thesis or research papers require work in foreign language sources are strongly urged to complete this requirement by the end of the first year of study. Advisors may set higher standards or include additional languages in which students must demonstrate competence. These standards should be established at the time a faculty member accepts a graduate student and fills out the plan of study form.

Writing Requirement

There are two options for satisfying the major writing requirement for the MA:

  • A students must complete a master's thesis in his or her major focus of study and pass an oral defense of the thesis before a committee of three faculty members
  • A student must complete two substantial research papers and pass an oral defense of these papers before a committee of three faculty members. For the purposes of this option, a research paper is defined as a paper of twenty-five pages or more, based on primary source research

Students completing the thesis option may enroll in a maximum of 10 credits of Thesis (HIST 503), usually in the winter and spring of their second year. Students choosing the research papers option may register for 5 credits of Research: [Topic] (HIST 601), usually in either winter or spring of their second year.

Under ordinary circumstances, it takes students two full years of work to complete this program.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Requirements

The department recently adopted new requirements (listed below) for PhD students entering in fall 2008 and subsequent years. Students who entered before this date are still subject to the old requirements, which are still available on our website.

Typically, incoming PhD students who enter with a master's degree are expected to have completed the equivalent of the history department's MA program. Students admitted on the BA-to-PhD track complete the program’s MA requirements as they progress toward their PhD degrees. In some cases, doctoral students might be admitted without having fulfilled some of these prerequisites—for example, a course equivalent to Historical Methods and Writings (HIST 612). If this is the case, doctoral students will be required to take Historical Methods and Writings (HIST 612), Professional Development (HIST 615), and Graduate Student Conference (HIST 616).

PhD students prepare themselves in three fields, as follows:

  1. Major Research Field. A specific, more narrowly defined field—typically, the area of one’s dissertation, as conventionally understood
  2. Major Teaching Field. A general, more broadly defined field that encompasses the research field but is more extensive—typically, a teaching field, as conventionally understood
  3. Minor Thematic, Methodological, or Comparative Field. Typically the theme, method, or comparison to be advanced in the dissertation

For example, a student of modern France might choose modern France as a major research field, modern Europe as a major teaching field, and gender history, intellectual history, or military history as a minor thematic field. A student of China might take a major research field in modern China, a teaching field in China, and a minor comparative field in Japan.

Plan of Study

By the end of the first term in the program, students are required to file a plan of study, signed by the advisor, in which they state their major field, list all anticipated course work, and specify their language requirement. The plan of study may be modified later by agreement of both student and advisor. All plans of study are reviewed and approved by the director of graduate studies.

An entering PhD student lacking the equivalent to Historical Methods and Writings (HIST 612) must take the same HIST 612, 615, 616 sequence as that required of MA. students (see table below). This requirement may be waived for incoming students with sufficient preparation based on prior graduate work.

HIST 611Field Readings 15
HIST 612Historical Methods and Writings 25
HIST 615Professional Development 31
HIST 616Graduate Student Conference 41
HIST 507Seminar: [Topic] (two seminars)5
or HIST 607 Seminar: [Topic]
HIST 608Colloquium: [Topic] (two colloquia) 55
1

Completed during the first two terms of the first year. This requirement may also be satisfied by completion of (1) an appropriate 500-level course, approved by an advisor, or (2) Colloquium: [Topic] (HIST 608), if equivalent to Field Readings (HIST 611).

2

Taken fall term.

3

Taken winter term.

4

Taken spring term.

5

Student may petition to replace Colloquium: [Topic] (HIST 608) with Colloquium: [Topic] (HIST 508).

Additional Requirements

  • Minor Field. Two courses at the 500 or 600 level that, together, define a thematic, methodological, or comparative field. A nonhistory course may be used with approval
  • One additional course at the 500 or 600 level in history or another field
  • Distribution Requirement. PhD students are required to take two courses focusing on subjects outside their country or region of geographic specialization

There is no total credit requirement for the PhD—rather, the Graduate School stipulates both a minimum (per term) credit requirement and a residency requirement.

Language Requirement

PhD students must demonstrate proficiency in at least one foreign language by passing an exam that tests their ability to read and comprehend a passage of average difficulty drawn from primary sources or the secondary literature. The language exam is offered once each term during the regular academic year.

Advisors must approve the choice of language. The language requirements of PhD students, however, will vary according to field. Students admitted into the PhD program should have the language preparation required to enable historical work in their field. Some additional language study might be required by individual advisors as an essential part of a student’s PhD work. These standards should be established at the time a faculty member accepts a graduate student and fills out the plan of study form.

Oral Comprehensive Examination

PhD students should take and pass their oral comprehensive examinations in the winter term of their second year, or during spring term at the latest. BA-to-PhD students should take their oral comprehensive exams in their third year. Students may, but are not required, to register for Comprehensive Exam Preparation (HIST 618) to prepare for their comprehensive examinations with the appropriate faculty members.

Dissertation

After completing course work, demonstrating language competence, and passing the oral comprehensive examination, the doctoral student advances to candidacy. The doctoral candidate must compose and defend a dissertation prospectus and then research and write a dissertation that makes an original scholarly contribution to the field and shows evidence of ability in independent investigation. Finally, the candidate defends the dissertation in a formal, public session.

Students should have tentatively identified a dissertation topic by the end of their first year (or, for BA-to-PhD students, by the fall of the third year) and should then file a Tentative Dissertation Topic Form with the graduate director.

PhD students must also prepare and defend a dissertation prospectus no later than the term subsequent to successful passage of the oral comprehensive exam. Students may, but are not required, to register for Dissertation Prospectus (HIST 619) to prepare their dissertation prospectus with the appropriate faculty.

Time to Degree

Applicants with MA degrees who are accepted into the PhD program must complete the PhD requirements within seven years.

Students with BA degrees who are admitted to the PhD program must complete the MA requirements within two years. Such students must complete both the MA and the PhD requirements within a total of seven years from the time of admission.

Courses

Course usage information

HIST 101. Western Civilization. 4 Credits.

Historical development of the Western world; major changes in value systems, ideas, social structures, economic institutions, and forms of political life. Ancient and medieval societies.

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HIST 102. Western Civilization. 4 Credits.

Historical development of the Western world; major changes in value systems, ideas, social structures, economic institutions, and forms of political life. From the Renaissance to Napoleon.

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HIST 103. Western Civilization. 4 Credits.

Historical development of the Western world; major changes in value systems, ideas, social structures, economic institutions, and forms of political life. From Napoleon to the present.

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HIST 104. World History. 4 Credits.

Survey of world cultures and civilizations and their actions. Includes study of missionary religions, imperialism, economic and social relations. Ancient societies.

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HIST 105. World History. 4 Credits.

Survey of world cultures and civilizations and their actions. Includes study of missionary religions, imperialism, economic and social relations. Early modern.

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HIST 106. World History. 4 Credits.

Survey of world cultures and civilizations and their actions. Includes study of missionary religions, imperialism, economic and social relations. Modern.

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HIST 120. Foundations of Islamic Civilization. 4 Credits.

Explores the history of the Near East in 600–1500 C.E., from the origins of Islam to the maturation of Islamicate civilization.

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HIST 121. Women in World History. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the history of women and gender. A comparative survey of women from prehistory to the present.

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HIST 186. Cultures of India. 4 Credits.

Introduces students to the historical study of culture in the Indian subcontinent.

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HIST 190. Foundations of East Asian Civilizations. 4 Credits.

Introduction to traditional China and Japan; Confucianism, Buddhism, Daoism; floating worlds; family and gender; traditional views of the body; literati class; samurai; Mongols and Manchus.

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HIST 191. China, Past and Present. 4 Credits.

Introduction to Chinese culture. Explores meanings of past and present in 20th-century efforts to modernize China. Chronological and topical inquiry into politics, literature, social structure, gender, art, economy.

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HIST 192. Japan, Past and Present. 4 Credits.

Introduction to Japanese culture. Explores myth, tradition, modernity, and postmodernity with one eye trained on the future. Examples from personal experience.

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HIST 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Problem-oriented course designed for students interested in history who might or might not become majors. Repeatable.

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HIST 201. Inventing America. 4 Credits.

Development of the North American continent socially, economically, politically, culturally. Native America, European colonization, colonial development, origins of slavery, Revolution, early Republic.

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HIST 202. Building the United States. 4 Credits.

Creation and development of the United States and its social, economical, political, and cultural consequences. Jacksonian era, expansion, commercial and industrial revolution, slavery, Civil War, Reconstruction.

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HIST 203. American Century. 4 Credits.

Creation and development of the so-called "American Century" socially, economically, politically, culturally. Imperialism, progressivism, modernity, the 1920s, Depression and New Deal, world wars and Cold War, 1960s, and recent developments.

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HIST 205. Ancient Sports. 4 Credits.

History of sports and athletics in ancient societies: examines intersections of class, social status, race, gender, and sexuality. Includes study of organizational, political, religious, and ideological dimensions.

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HIST 215. Food in World History. 4 Credits.

Surveys the development of eating practices, tastes, foodstuffs, and culinary philosophies from early human history to the present in diverse parts of the world.

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HIST 221. Sex in History. 4 Credits.

Introduces students to the history of sexuality. Comparative overview of sexual politics, ethics, and identities in diverse societies from the ancient world to the present.

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HIST 239. Classical and Medieval Warfare. 4 Credits.

Examines war and armies in the ancient Mediterranean and in medieval Europe. Series with HIST 240, HIST 241.

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HIST 240. War in the Modern World I. 4 Credits.

Evolution of the conduct of war in the 19th and 20th centuries as a reflection of social, political, and technological developments.

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HIST 241. War in the Modern World II. 4 Credits.

Surveys changes in the nature and conduct of warfare in light of social, political, and technological developments from 1945 to present.

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HIST 245. Russia, America, and the World. 4 Credits.

The United States and Russia share historical experiences that extend far beyond diplomacy, trade, and international adversity or alliance. Includes frontier expansion, revolution, industrialization, imperialism, world view.

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HIST 248. Latinos in the Americas. 4 Credits.

Explores historical experiences of Latino groups, emphasizing Mexican and Caribbean migrations. Lectures in English; readings and discussions in English, Spanish, and Spanglish. Two years of high school Spanish or SPAN 103 with a grade of C or better recommended.

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HIST 250. African American History. 4 Credits.

The African background, development of slavery, abolitionism, the Civil War and Reconstruction.

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HIST 251. African American History. 4 Credits.

The 20th-century African American experience including the great migration, World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, post-1970 African America.

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HIST 273. Introduction to American Environmental History. 4 Credits.

Introduction to concepts, concerns, and methods of environmental history, especially in the context of American history to the present.

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HIST 286. Cities in India and South Asia. 4 Credits.

This course examines the economic, cultural and social dimensions of cities in the subcontinent of India with comparisons from other Asian and North American cities.

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HIST 298. Temporary Group-Satisfying Course. 4 Credits.

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HIST 301. Modern Europe. 4 Credits.

Political, social, cultural, intellectual, and economic trends from the 18th century to the present. 18th century. McCole.

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HIST 302. Modern Europe. 4 Credits.

Political, social, cultural, intellectual, and economic trends in the 19th century.

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HIST 303. Modern Europe. 4 Credits.

Political, social, cultural, intellectual, and economic trends in the 20th century.

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HIST 308. History of Women in the United States I. 4 Credits.

Survey of the diverse experiences of American women from 1600 to 1870.

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HIST 309. History of Women in the United States II. 4 Credits.

Survey of the diverse experiences of American women from 1870 to present.

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HIST 319. Early Middle Ages in Europe. 4 Credits.

Emergence, from the remains of the late Roman Empire, of a uniquely medieval Christian culture in the Germanic kingdoms of northern Europe between the 4th and 9th centuries.

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HIST 320. High Middle Ages in Europe. 4 Credits.

Changes that swept Europe from 1000 to 1225, including the rise of towns and universities, new spiritual and artistic visions, and varieties of religious and social reform.

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HIST 321. Late Middle Ages in Europe. 4 Credits.

A survey of Europe, 1250-1430, the age of Dante and the Black Death, when breakthroughs alternated with disasters in the realms of politics, economics, and religion.

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HIST 322. The Crusades. 4 Credits.

Surveys the idea and practice of Christian holy war—not only in Palestine, but within Europe. From the First Crusade in 1096 through early 13th Century.

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HIST 325. Precolonial Africa. 4 Credits.

Survey of African history to the mid-19th century, analyzing processes of state formation, regional and long-distance trade, religion, oral tradition, and systems of slavery.

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HIST 326. Colonial and Postcolonial Africa. 4 Credits.

Survey of African history from the late 1800s to the turn of the 21st century. Emphasis is on the internal dynamics of change as well as the effects of colonialism and global interaction.

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HIST 332. British History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

British history from the Celts to the 21st century—economic, political, religious, and social change. McGowen. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.

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HIST 336. France. 4 Credits.

Ancient regime, 1789–1870—French Revolutions of 1789, 1830, and 1848; Napoleonic Empire; monarchy, republicanism, and dictatorship; society and culture in post-Revolutionary France. Birn, Sheridan.

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HIST 337. France. 4 Credits.

1870 to the present—the Paris Commune and Third Republic; the Dreyfus affair; popular front, fall of France and Resistance; Algeria, de Gaulle, the 1968 student movement.

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HIST 340. US Military History. 4 Credits.

Survey of US military history from the colonial period to the present with a focus on the organization, operations, and strategy of the US Army in wartime.

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HIST 342. German History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Middle Ages to the end of the 20th century. I: Middle Ages and Reformation (1410–1648). II: Germany in the Old Regime and Age of Revolution (1648–1848). III: Modern Germany (1848–present). Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.

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HIST 345. Early Russia. 4 Credits.

Kievan Rus and Byzantium; Christianization; Mongol dominance; rise of Moscow and two Ivans, one Great, one Terrible; crisis of modernization and subsequent religious dissent.

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HIST 346. Imperial Russia. 4 Credits.

Siberian and North American expansion; Peter the Great; Catherine the Great; abolition of serfdom; industrialization; Silver Age culture and revolution; World War I and collapse.

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HIST 347. Soviet Union and Contemporary Russia. 4 Credits.

Examines the rise, development, and collapse of the Soviet Union, the world's first communist regime. Topics include the Russian Revolution, Stalinism, war, culture, and society.

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HIST 350. American Radicalism. 4 Credits.

Motives, strategies, successes, and failures of radical movements and their significance for American society. American Revolution, slave revolts, abolitionism, women's rights.

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HIST 351. American Radicalism. 4 Credits.

Motives, strategies, successes, and failures of radical movements and their significance for American society. Workers' movements, socialism, communism, African American freedom struggle, nationalist movements of people of color, feminism, student activism.

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HIST 352. The United States in the 1960s. 4 Credits.

Exploration of a watershed era: civil rights, student activism, educational crisis, Vietnam War, gender revolution, environmentalism.

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HIST 358. American Jewish History. 4 Credits.

Ways people who identify themselves as Jews have reinvented their identity and created communities in the United States through the 1990s.

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HIST 361. Early Modern Science. 4 Credits.

Explores the subject, practive, and social place of science in the early modern world.

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HIST 363. American Business History. 4 Credits.

American businesses from their colonial origins to the present. Interaction between the political, social, economic, and ideological environment and the internal structure and activities of business enterprises.

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HIST 368. American West in Popular Culture. 4 Credits.

Examines the idea of the West in the American imagination as expressed in popular literature, captivity narratives, dime novels, travel literature, art, Wild West shows, films, and television.

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HIST 373. Shi’ism and Revolution. 4 Credits.

A historical introduction to Shi’ism exploring its connection with revolutionary movements throughout Islamic history and the relationship between ideology and historical change.

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HIST 378. American Environmental History to 1890. 4 Credits.

Considers how humans and their natural environments have interacted and reshaped each other through time from 1491 to 1890.

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HIST 379. American Environmental History, 1890-Present. 4 Credits.

Focuses on environmental change and the rise of environmental politics from the Progressive Era to the present.

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HIST 380. Latin America. 4 Credits.

Major economic, political, and cultural trends and continuities. Pre-Columbian and Iberian history, the colonial period up to 1750.
Prereq: Sophomore standing recommended.

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HIST 381. Latin America. 4 Credits.

Major economic, political, and cultural trends and continuities. Transition from late colonial mercantilism to political independence and national definition, 1750–1910.
Prereq: Sophomore standing recommended.

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HIST 382. Latin America. 4 Credits.

Major economic, political, and cultural trends and continuities. Reform and revolution in modern Latin American history, 1910 to the present.
Prereq: sophomore standing recommended.

Course usage information

HIST 385. South Asia: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Introduction to South Asian history in the modern period—South Asia I (1757–1971); South Asia II (1930 to the present). Repeatable once when topic changes for a maximum of 8 credits.

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HIST 386. India. 4 Credits.

This course will survey the history of the Indian subcontinent as both a colony of Britain and then as a cluster of independent countries in the 20th and 21st centuries.

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HIST 387. Early China. 4 Credits.

Survey from the beginnings to the 10th century focuses on the development of Chinese thought and religion and the growth of the imperial state and bureaucracy.

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HIST 388. Vietnam War and the United States. 4 Credits.

Vietnamese society and history: the First Indochina War, origins and escalation of United States involvement in Vietnam; de-escalation and defeat.

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HIST 396. Samurai in Film. 4 Credits.

Examination of the image of Japan's warrior class, the most prominent social group in Japan for over seven centuries. Combines films, readings, and lectures.

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HIST 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 403. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 404. Internship. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable once for a maximum of 6 credits.

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HIST 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Recent topics include History of Los Angeles, Modern Japanese Culture, Rethinking America in the 1960s, and Stalinism. Repeatable.

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HIST 408. Colloquium: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Current topics include Southeast Asia Interpretations. Repeatable.

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HIST 409. Supervised Tutoring. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable four times for maximum of 8 credits.

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HIST 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 411. Reacting to the Past [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Intensive exploration of historical events through interactive games. Possible topics include US Constitutional Convention, French Revolution, Democracy in Athens, India 1947. Repeatable once for a maximum of 8 credits when topic changes.

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HIST 412. Ancient Greece: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Political, cultural, and intellectual history of ancient Greece; emphasis on urban culture. I: Classical Greece. II: Hellenistic World. III: Greek Science. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 414. Ancient Rome: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Political, social, cultural, and intellectual history of ancient Rome from its foundation to late antiquity; emphasis on urban culture. I: Roman Republic. II: Roman Empire. III: Roman Society. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

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HIST 415. Advanced World History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Advanced intensive study of selected issues in world history. Possible topics include biology and ecology, ancient empires, or intercultural encounters. Repeatable when topic changes.

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HIST 416. Advanced Women's History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Intensive study of select issues in women's history. Emphasis on the construction of their diverse identities; the framework for political, social, and economic empowerment; the historical development of gendered categories. Repeatable when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

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HIST 417. Society and Culture in Modern Africa: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Explorations in various topics with attention to class, gender, and generational and political struggles. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

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HIST 419. African Regional Histories: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Examines the historiography of specific nations or regions. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits.

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HIST 420. The Idea of Europe. 4 Credits.

The concept and experience of Europe explored creatively throughout history from multiple disciplinary perspectives.

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HIST 425. Economic History of Modern Europe: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Industrial revolution, economic transformation, growth, and integration in political and social contexts. Focuses on Britain, France, Germany, and Russia. I: European Economies to 1914. II: European Economies in the 20th Century. Repeatable once when topic changes for maximum of 8 credits.

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HIST 427. Intellectual History of Modern Europe: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Major thinkers and movements include classical liberalism, utopian socialism, political economy, Marxism, aestheticism, Nietzsche, classical sociology, psychoanalysis, radical conservatism, Keynesian economics, intellectuals and political engagement, and Western Marxism. I: German Intellectual History. II: Ideas and Society, 19th Century. III: Ideas and Society, 20th Century. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

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HIST 428. Europe in the 20th Century: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

War, revolution, social change, political transformation, and related intellectual and cultural developments in Europe from the Great War of 1914–18 through the present. I: European Fascism. II: Jews in Modern Europe. III: Eastern Europe since World War I. IV: Europe since 1945. Repeatable when chronological or thematic topic changes.

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HIST 434. Modern British History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected topics in modern British history from 1700 to the present. Emphasis varies. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

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HIST 435. Revolutionary and Napoleonic Europe. 4 Credits.

The French Revolution; Napoleon; German idealism; British industry; the coalescence of European identity; revolutions in knowledge and education; changing gender roles; imperialism.

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HIST 436. Medieval Central Europe: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected topics in the political, cultural, religious and economic history of Germany and neighboring peoples during the Middle Ages, from the eighth through 13th centuries. Repeatable when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

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HIST 437. Medieval Spain. 4 Credits.

A study of two related aspects of medieval Iberian history: Spain as a frontier society and Spain as a multicultural, multireligious society.

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HIST 438. Golden Age Spain. 4 Credits.

Spanish history during one of the most important eras of its past, when it was a cultural leader in Europe and a major world power.

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HIST 441. 16th-Century European Reformations. 4 Credits.

History of religious, personal, and institutional reforms. Includes late medieval reform movements and the ideas of Erasmus, Luther, Calvin, Ignatius Loyola, and Teresa of Avila.

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HIST 442. Early Modern German History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics include peasant society, the foundations of absolutism, the German Enlightenment, protoindustrialization. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

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HIST 443. Modern Germany: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics include class formation, revolutionary movements, the socialist tradition, the Third Reich. Repeatable when topic changes.

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HIST 444. The Holocaust. 4 Credits.

Surveys history of Nazi genocide, focusing on terror and complicity in formation of racial policy; and on perceptions of Nazi anti-Semitism as the Holocaust was occurring.

Course usage information

HIST 445. Tsarist and Imperial Russia: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Creation of a great Eurasian civilization. Geopolitical expansion, Siberia, imperialism, origins of autocracy, serfdom, church and state, political opposition, rise of civil society, industrialization. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 446. Modern Russia: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Explores topics such as the intellectual and cultural history of Russia from the revolution to recent times. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits.

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HIST 449. Race and Ethnicity in the American West. 4 Credits.

Explores the growth of communities of color in western cities of the United States, with particular reference to competition and cooperation between groups.

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HIST 450. The Iraq War, 2003–2011. 4 Credits.

A history of the Iraq War from the Bush administration’s decision to invade Iraq to the departure of US forces in 2011.

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HIST 451. American Foreign Relations: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Chronological and thematic topics in American foreign relations. Repeatable when topic changes.

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HIST 455. Colonial American History. 4 Credits.

Native Americans; motives, methods, implications of European colonization; origins of American slavery; interaction of diverse peoples in shaping colonial North American societies, economies, landscapes, politics.

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HIST 456. Revolutionary America. 4 Credits.

Origins, consequences, meanings of American Revolution; changing social, economic, and political contexts; intellectual, religious, and ideological trends; Constitution; institutional, social, and cultural legacy.

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HIST 457. 19th-Century United States: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Political, social, economic, and cultural history. I: Jacksonian Era. II: Civil War. III: Reconstruction. IV: Gilded Age. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 460. American Intellectual History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Leading thinkers and prevalent modes of thought in American life from European settlement of North America to the present. I: To 1800, II: 19th Century, III: 20th Century. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

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HIST 461. American Medical History. 4 Credits.

Explores nine major subjects in the social history of medicine and health in the United States. Offered alternate years.

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HIST 463. American Economic History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Varying topics on the economic development of the United States as a preindustrial, industrial, and postindustrial society. I: The Great Depression. II: Industrialization. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

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HIST 466. The American West. 4 Credits.

Social, political, and cultural history. Peoples of the American West and the expansion of the United States in the 19th century.

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HIST 467. The American West. 4 Credits.

Social, political, and cultural history. 20th-century immigration, urban growth, economic development; social and political institutions; politics of race, ethnicity, and gender in a multicultural region.

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HIST 468. The Pacific Northwest. 4 Credits.

Regional history to the mid-20th century. How the Pacific Northwest mirrors the national experience and how the region has a distinctive history and culture.

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HIST 469. American Indian History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Variable chronological, thematic, and regional topics, including Indian history to 1860; 1860 to the present; Indians and colonialism; Indians and environments; Indians and gender; regional histories. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 473. American Environmental History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Variable topics examine the social, cultural, economic, and political history of the American landscape; how Americans have understood, transformed, degraded, conserved, and preserved their environments. I: To 1800. II: 19th Century. III: 20th-Century Environment and Environmentalism. IV: Environment and the West. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 480. Mexico. 4 Credits.

Mexican history from pre-Hispanic times to the present. Special attention to nationhood, economic development, church-state relations, the Mexican identity, and the Revolution of 1910.

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HIST 482. Latin America's Indian Peoples. 4 Credits.

Impact of Iberian conquest and settlement on the lives of the indigenous peoples of the Caribbean, Mexico, Central America, and South America.

Course usage information

HIST 483. Latin America: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Variable topics include the experience of blacks and Indians; the struggle for land, reform, and revolution. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 484. Philippines. 4 Credits.

Philippine history from pre-Hispanic times to the present with particular emphasis on the past hundred years.

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HIST 487. China: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Survey from the 10th century. Foundations and transformations of state and society; popular rebellions; impact of imperialism; issues of modernity; state building; political, cultural, and social revolutions. I: Song and Yuan. II: Ming and Qing. III: Late Qing. IV: Republican China. V: China since 1949. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 490. Japan: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Political, social, and cultural history from ancient through contemporary. Origins, aristocratic society, medieval age, Zen, warrior class, urban growth, modernization, imperialism, Pacific war, postwar society. I: Classical Age. II: Shogun’s Japan, 1550–1800. III: Modern Age. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 491. Medicine and Society in Premodern Japan. 4 Credits.

Examines the interweaving of folk, Buddhist, Chinese, and Dutch influences. Diseases, knowledge, sexual hygiene, and medical challenges in social context.

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HIST 497. Culture, Modernity, and Revolution in China: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

I: Modernity and Gender. II: Cultural Revolution and Memory. III: Historiography of the Communist Revolution. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 498. Early Japanese Culture and Society: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Aspects of social history through 1800—social change, hierarchy and power, interrelationship of society and religion, medieval transformations, warrior class. I: Buddhism and Society in Medieval Japan. II: Samurai and War. III: Medieval Japan. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: Courses on Japanese or medieval history recommended.

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HIST 503. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include History of Los Angeles, Modern Japanese Culture, Rethinking America in the 1960s, and Stalinism.

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HIST 508. Colloquium: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable. Current topics include Southeast Asia Interpretations.

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HIST 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

HIST 512. Ancient Greece: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Political, cultural, and intellectual history of ancient Greece; emphasis on urban culture. I: Classical Greece. II: Hellenistic World. III: Greek Science. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 514. Ancient Rome: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Political, social, cultural, and intellectual history of ancient Rome from its foundation to late antiquity; emphasis on urban culture. I: Roman Republic. II: Roman Empire. III: Roman Society. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 515. Advanced World History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Advanced intensive study of selected issues in world history. Possible topics include biology and ecology, ancient empires, or intercultural encounters. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

HIST 516. Advanced Women's History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Intensive study of select issues in women's history. Emphasis on the construction of their diverse identities; the framework for political, social, and economic empowerment; the historical development of gendered categories. Repeatable when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

HIST 517. Society and Culture in Modern Africa: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Explorations in various topics with attention to class, gender, and generational and political struggles. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 519. African Regional Histories: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Examines the historiography of specific nations or regions. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 520. The Idea of Europe. 4 Credits.

The concept and experience of Europe explored creatively throughout history from multiple disciplinary perspectives.

Course usage information

HIST 525. Economic History of Modern Europe: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Industrial revolution, economic transformation, growth, and integration in political and social contexts. Focuses on Britain, France, Germany, and Russia. I: European Economies to 1914. II: European Economies in the 20th Century. Repeatable once when topic changes for maximum of 8 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 527. Intellectual History of Modern Europe: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Major thinkers and movements include classical liberalism, utopian socialism, political economy, Marxism, aestheticism, Nietzsche, classical sociology, psychoanalysis, radical conservatism, Keynesian economics, intellectuals and political engagement, and Western Marxism. I: German Intellectual History. II: Ideas and Society, 19th Century. III: Ideas and Society, 20th Century. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 528. Europe in the 20th Century: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

War, revolution, social change, political transformation, and related intellectual and cultural developments in Europe from the Great War of 1914-18 through the present. I: European Fascism. II: Jews in Modern Europe. III: Eastern Europe since World War I. IV: Europe since 1945. Repeatable when chronological or thematic topic changes.

Course usage information

HIST 534. Modern British History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected topics in modern British history from 1700 to the present. Emphasis varies. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 536. Medieval Central Europe: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected topics in the political, cultural, religious and economic history of Germany and neighboring peoples during the Middle Ages, from the eighth through 13th centuries. Repeatable when topic changes. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

HIST 537. Medieval Spain. 4 Credits.

A study of two related aspects of medieval Iberian history: Spain as a frontier society and Spain as a multicultural, multireligious society.

Course usage information

HIST 538. Golden Age Spain. 4 Credits.

Spanish history during one of the most important eras of its past, when it was a cultural leader in Europe and a major world power.

Course usage information

HIST 541. 16th-Century European Reformations. 4 Credits.

History of religious, personal, and institutional reforms. Includes late medieval reform movements and the ideas of Erasmus, Luther, Calvin, Ignatius Loyola, and Teresa of Avila.

Course usage information

HIST 542. Early Modern German History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics include peasant society, the foundations of absolutism, the German Enlightenment, protoindustrialization. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 543. Modern Germany: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics include class formation, revolutionary movements, the socialist tradition, the Third Reich. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

HIST 544. The Holocaust. 4 Credits.

Surveys history of Nazi genocide, focusing on terror and complicity in formation of racial policy; and on perceptions of Nazi anti-Semitism as the Holocaust was occurring.

Course usage information

HIST 545. Tsarist and Imperial Russia: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Creation of a great Eurasian civilization. Geopolitical expansion, Siberia, imperialism, origins of autocracy, serfdom, church and state, political opposition, rise of civil society, industrialization. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 546. Modern Russia: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Explores topics such as the intellectual and cultural history of Russia from the revolution to recent times. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 549. Race and Ethnicity in the American West. 4 Credits.

Explores the growth of communities of color in western cities of the United States, with particular reference to competition and cooperation between groups.

Course usage information

HIST 550. The Iraq War, 2003–2011. 4 Credits.

A history of the Iraq War from the Bush administration’s decision to invade Iraq to the departure of US forces in 2011.

Course usage information

HIST 551. American Foreign Relations: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Chronological and thematic topics in American foreign relations. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

HIST 555. Colonial American History. 4 Credits.

Native Americans; motives, methods, implications of European colonization; origins of American slavery; interaction of diverse peoples in shaping colonial North American societies, economies, landscapes, politics.

Course usage information

HIST 556. Revolutionary America. 4 Credits.

Origins, consequences, meanings of American Revolution; changing social, economic, and political contexts; intellectual, religious, and ideological trends; Constitution; institutional, social, and cultural legacy.

Course usage information

HIST 557. 19th-Century United States: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Political, social, economic, and cultural history. I: Jacksonian Era. II: Civil War. III: Reconstruction. IV: Gilded Age. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 560. American Intellectual History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Leading thinkers and prevalent modes of thought in American life from European settlement of North America to the present. I: To 1800, II: 19th Century, III: 20th Century. Herman. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 561. American Medical History. 4 Credits.

Explores nine major subjects in the social history of medicine and health in the United States. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

HIST 563. American Economic History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Varying topics on the economic development of the United States as a preindustrial, industrial, and postindustrial society. I: The Great Depression. II: Industrialization. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 566. The American West. 4 Credits.

Social, political, and cultural history. Peoples of the American West and the expansion of the United States in the 19th century.

Course usage information

HIST 567. The American West. 4 Credits.

Social, political, and cultural history. 20th-century immigration, urban growth, economic development; social and political institutions; politics of race, ethnicity, and gender in a multicultural region.

Course usage information

HIST 568. The Pacific Northwest. 4 Credits.

Regional history to the mid-20th century. How the Pacific Northwest mirrors the national experience and how the region has a distinctive history and culture.

Course usage information

HIST 569. American Indian History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Variable chronological, thematic, and regional topics, including Indian history to 1860; 1860 to the present; Indians and colonialism; Indians and environments; Indians and gender; regional histories. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 573. American Environmental History: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Variable topics examine the social, cultural, economic, and political history of the American landscape; how Americans have understood, transformed, degraded, conserved, and preserved their environments. I: To 1800. II: 19th Century. III: 20th-Century Environment and Environmentalism. IV: Environment and the West. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 580. Mexico. 4 Credits.

Mexican history from pre-Hispanic times to the present. Special attention to nationhood, economic development, church-state relations, the Mexican identity, and the Revolution of 1910.

Course usage information

HIST 582. Latin America's Indian Peoples. 4 Credits.

Impact of Iberian conquest and settlement on the lives of the indigenous peoples of the Caribbean, Mexico, Central America, and South America.

Course usage information

HIST 583. Latin America: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Variable topics include the experience of blacks and Indians; the struggle for land, reform, and revolution. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 584. Philippines. 4 Credits.

Philippine history from pre-Hispanic times to the present with particular emphasis on the past hundred years.

Course usage information

HIST 587. China: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Survey from the 10th century. Foundations and transformations of state and society; popular rebellions; impact of imperialism; issues of modernity; state building; political, cultural, and social revolutions. I: Song and Yuan. II: Ming and Qing. III: Late Qing. IV: Republican China. V: China since 1949. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 590. Japan: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Political, social, and cultural history from ancient through contemporary. Origins, aristocratic society, medieval age, Zen, warrior class, urban growth, modernization, imperialism, Pacific war, postwar society. I: Classical Age. II: Shogun’s Japan, 1550–1800. III: Modern Age. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 591. Medicine and Society in Premodern Japan. 4 Credits.

Examines the interweaving of folk, Buddhist, Chinese, and Dutch influences. Diseases, knowledge, sexual hygiene, and medical challenges in social context.

Course usage information

HIST 597. Culture, Modernity, and Revolution in China: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

I: Modernity and Gender. II: Cultural Revolution and Memory. III: Historiography of the Communist Revolution. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

HIST 598. Early Japanese Culture and Society: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Aspects of social history through 1800—social change, hierarchy and power, interrelationship of society and religion, medieval transformations, warrior class. I: Buddhism and Society in Medieval Japan. II: Samurai and War. III: Medieval Japan. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: Courses on Japanese or medieval history recommended.

Course usage information

HIST 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 603. Dissertation. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 604. Internship: [Topic]. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable once for a maximum of 6 credits.

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HIST 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

HIST 608. Colloquium: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Recent offerings include Medieval Europe; Race and Labor in the United States; Race, Gender, and State; Society and Revolution in East Asia. Repeatable.

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HIST 609. Supervised Tutoring. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

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HIST 611. Field Readings. 5 Credits.

Independent study designed to ground students in major works and issues of their chosen field. Intensive study, based on a substantial reading list, requiring substantial written work.

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HIST 612. Historical Methods and Writings. 5 Credits.

Introduction to the historical profession; includes historical questions, methods, and theories, and historiographic debates. Sequence.

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HIST 615. Professional Development. 1 Credit.

Promotes understanding of the history profession and development of professional skills through a variety of activities—workshops on research and writing, critiques of scholarly presentations, discussion of the academic job market. Offered once per academic year.

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HIST 616. Graduate Student Conference. 1 Credit.

Designed to build on work from HIST 612 and 615 courses. Promotes understanding of history profession, standards, protocols; plan and host conference. Offeredonce per academic year.

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HIST 618. Comprehensive Exam Preparation. 5 Credits.

Independent readings with faculty members to discuss a predetermined reading list in preparation for PhD comprehensive examination.

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HIST 619. Dissertation Prospectus. 5 Credits.

Independent research under the direction of student's adviser with the specific aim of producing a defensible dissertation prospectus.