Linguistics

http://linguistics.uoregon.edu

Spike Gildea, Department Head
541-346-3906
161 Straub Hall
1290 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-1290

The Department of Linguistics offers instruction leading to a bachelor of arts (BA), a master of arts (MA), and a doctor of philosophy (PhD) degree in linguistics. The interests of its faculty are in the documentation, preservation, and revitalization of endangered languages; historical linguistics; laboratory phonology; language acquisition and learning; language variation and change; morphosyntax; phonetics; psycholinguistics; semantics; Slavic linguistics; sociolinguistics; and typology.

Faculty

Melissa Michaud Baese-Berk, associate professor (second-language acquisition, phonetics, laboratory phonology, psycholinguistics). BA, 2004, Boston; PhD, 2010, Northwestern. (2013)

B. Mokaya Bosire, instructor (Swahili). BA, 1991, MA, 1993, Nairobi; PhD, 2008, State University of New York, Albany. (2012)

Scott DeLancey, professor (phonology, semantics, syntax; Sino-Tibetan and North American languages). BA, 1972, Cornell; PhD, 1980, Indiana. (1982)

Spike Gildea, professor (language description, diachronic syntax, typology, phonology, comparative linguistics, field methods and ethics, Cariban and other South American languages). BA, 1983, MA, 1989, PhD, 1992, Oregon. (2000)

Vsevolod M. Kapatsinski, associate professor (psycholinguistics, corpus linguistics, experimental morphology and phonology, language learning in the lab). BA, 2003, MA, 2005, New Mexico; PhD, 2009, Indiana. (2009)

Tyler S. Kendall, associate professor (sociolinguistics, corpus linguistics, phonetics, language and law). BA, 1998, Cornell; PhD, 2009, Duke. (2010)

Doris L. Payne, professor (morphology, syntax, semantics, discourse; Amerindian and African languages). BS, 1974, Wheaton; MA, 1976, Texas, Arlington; PhD, 1985, California, Los Angeles. (1987)

Eric W. Pederson, associate professor (cognitive and psycholinguistics, language and culture; South Indian languages). BA, 1982, MA, 1985, PhD, 1991, California, Berkeley. (1997)

Melissa Redford, professor (phonetics, laboratory phonology, psycholinguistics, cognitive science). BA, 1992, California, Berkeley; MA, 1995, PhD, 1999, Texas, Austin. (2002)

Julie M. Sykes, associate professor (second language acquisition, interlanguage pragmatics, transformative pedagogy). BA, 2001, MA, 2005, Arizona State; PhD, 2008, Minnesota. (2016)

Cynthia M. Vakareliyska, professor (Slavic linguistics). BA, 1973, Princeton; JD, 1976, Columbia; PhD, 1990, Harvard. (1994)

Charlotte R. Vaughn, instructor (speech perception, psycholinguistics, talker variability, sociophonetics). BA, 2005, Duke; MA, 2011, PhD, 2014, Northwestern. (2014)

Keli D. Yerian, senior lecturer (language teacher education, curriculum development, gesture in discourse); director, Language Teaching Specialization MA Program. BA, 1991, North Carolina, Chapel Hill; MS, 1994, PhD, 2000, Georgetown. (2007)

Emeriti

T. Givón, professor emeritus. BSc, 1959, Jerusalem; MS, 1962, MA, 1966, PhD, 1969, California, Los Angeles. (1981)

Russell S. Tomlin, professor emeritus. BA, 1973, Knox; MA, 1975, PhD, 1979, Michigan. (1979)

Participating

Gregory D. Anderson, linguistics

Dare A. Baldwin, psychology

Marjorie S. Barker, linguistics

Lucien Brown, East Asian languages and literatures

Robert L. Davis, Romance languages

Tom Delaney, American English Institute

Robert Elliott, Northwest Indian Language Institute

Andrew Halvorsen, American English Institute

Laura G. Holland, American English Institute

Kaori Idemaru, East Asian languages and literatures

Zhuo Jing-Schmidt, East Asian languages and literatures

Mark Johnson, philosophy

Sarah Klinghammer, linguistics

Jeffrey Magoto, Yamada Language Center

Helen Neville, psychology

Thomas E. Payne, linguistics

Trish Pashby, American English Institute

Janne Underriner, Northwest Indian Language Institute

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Undergraduate Studies

The program offers instruction in the nature of human language, the structural variety of individual languages, and the methodology of conducting a linguistic investigation. The primary aim of linguistics as a science is to study the use and organization of human language in coding and communicating knowledge. Although linguists may study specific facts of many languages, they do so to gain insight into the properties and processes common to all languages. Such common features may in turn reflect universals of human cognitive, cultural, and social organization.

Language occupies a central position in the human universe, so much so that it is often cited as a major criterion for defining humanity. Its use in the coding and processing of knowledge makes it relevant to psychology. As a tool of reasoning, it verges on logic and philosophy. As a computational system, it relates to computer science and language-data processing. As a repository of one’s cultural worldview, it is a part of anthropology. As an instrument of social intercourse and a mark of social identity, it interacts with sociology. As a biological subsystem lodged in the brain, it is highly relevant to neurology. As the primary vehicle of learning and maturation, it is important for education. As an expressive medium, it is the crux of literature and rhetoric.

Careers

To gain understanding into the complexities of human language is thus to gain entrance into numerous fields of academic investigation and practical use. Indeed, computer programmers, conflict mediators, cryptologists, elementary school teachers, language teachers, lawyers, psychiatrists, speech therapists, and translators all depend heavily on understanding the nature and use of language.

The BA degree in linguistics provides a solid foundation for graduate studies in anthropology, communication, communication disorders and sciences, computer-science education, journalism, law, linguistics, literature and languages, philosophy, psychology, or sociology. It offers a strong entry into the applied fields listed above.

Advising

Undergraduate majors should consult one of the departmental undergraduate advisors each term about their study program.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Core Courses
LING 301Introduction to Linguistics Analysis4
LING 302Introduction to Linguistic Behavior4
LING 411Phonetics4
LING 450Introduction to Phonology4
LING 435Morphology and Syntax4
LING 451Functional Syntax I4
Specialization Courses
Choose three of the following:12
Language and Cognition
Semantics
Second-Language Acquisition
Functional Syntax II
Historical and Comparative Linguistics
Sociolinguistics
Electives8
Seminar: [Topic] (Proseminar)
Any 200-level or greater LING course (except LING 440)
Total Credits44

Core Courses

The six core courses are designed to expose you to the analysis of linguistic data and language acquisition, variation, and change: two introductory courses, Introduction to Linguistics Analysis (LING 301) and Introduction to Linguistic Behavior (LING 302); two courses focusing on sound, Phonetics (LING 411) and Introduction to Phonology (LING 450); and two courses focusing on grammar, Morphology and Syntax (LING 435) and Functional Syntax I (LING 451).

Specialization Courses

These three courses allow students to focus either on language behavior or linguistic analysis, on cognitive aspects or grammar.

Electives

Two courses complete the requirements:

  • Elective. Any linguistics (LING) course numbered between 200 and 499, except Linguistic Principles and Second-Language Learning (LING 440)
  • Proseminar elective. Seminar: [Topic] (LING 407). It is sometimes possible to substitute another 400-level course that has fewer students, most readings from primary literature, and discussion-oriented class periods with a rigorous term paper. Seminars typically have prerequisites, often a subset of the required courses.

For a list of preapproved non-LING courses that can serve as an elective, visit the department website.

Additional Requirements

Two years of one second language and one year of another.

Courses applied to the major in linguistics must be taken for letter grades. A course in which a grade of D+ or lower is earned cannot count toward the major.

The study program of undergraduate linguistics majors must be approved by a departmental undergraduate advisor.

Honors in Linguistics

By fulfilling the following requirements, any linguistics major may graduate with honors.

Grade Point Average

On entry to the honors program at the end of the junior year, a grade point average (GPA) of 3.75 or better in linguistics courses and at least 3.50 overall is required. At the end of the senior year, a GPA of 3.75 or better in linguistics courses is required.

Senior Thesis

Write an original honors thesis under the guidance of a thesis advisor from the linguistics faculty, chosen in consultation with the undergraduate advisor. The thesis must be a substantial piece of work; it may be a revised and expanded term paper. The thesis advisor determines whether the thesis is acceptable; the student is required to register for at least 6 credits in Thesis (LING 403), taken pass/no pass, over the course of at least two terms.

Upon fulfilling these requirements, the candidate is approved to receive a BA degree with honors in linguistics.

Minor in Linguistics

The minor grounds the student in the basics of linguistic analysis and offers the opportunity to pursue areas of special interest. The minor requires at least 28 credits in linguistics course work. Under special circumstances substitutions to courses listed below are possible. Students need permission from an undergraduate advisor to pursue an alternative program of study.

Minor Degree Requirements

LING 301Introduction to Linguistics Analysis4
LING 411Phonetics4
LING 435Morphology and Syntax4
LING 450Introduction to Phonology4
LING 451Functional Syntax I4
Select two of the following:8
Languages of the World
Language and Society in the United States
Language and Cognition
Other elective courses as approved by advisor
Total Credits28

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years. There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
WR 121 College Composition I 4
First term of first-year second-language sequence 4-5
Elective course with LING subject code May be taken any term4
Arts and letters group-satisfying course 4
 Credits 16-17
Winter
WR 122
College Composition II
or College Composition III
4
Elective course with LING subject code May be taken any term4
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 4-5
Social science group-satisfying course 4
 Credits 16-17
Spring
LING 301 Introduction to Linguistics Analysis 4
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 4-5
Social science group-satisfying course 4
Science group-satisfying course 4
 Credits 16-17
 Total Credits 48-51
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
LING 411 Phonetics 4
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4-5
Arts and letters group-satisfying course 4
Social science group-satisfying course 4
 Credits 16-17
Winter
LING 450 Introduction to Phonology 4
LING 302 Introduction to Linguistic Behavior 4
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4-5
Science group-satisfying course 4
 Credits 16-17
Spring
Third term of second-year second-language sequence 4-5
Science group-satisfying course 4
Elective course 4
Arts and letters group-satisfying course 4
 Credits 16-17
 Total Credits 48-51
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
LING 435 Morphology and Syntax 4
Third language course 4-5
First of three specialization courses 4
Arts and letters group-satisfying course 4
 Credits 16-17
Winter
LING 451 Functional Syntax I 4
Third language course 4-5
Second of three specialization courses 4
Social Science group-satisfying course Only three social science group courses are listed because LING 301 counts as the fourth social science group course4
 Credits 16-17
Spring
LING 407 Seminar: [Topic] Can be taken any term; required for graduation 4
Third language course 4-5
Elective course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement Choose a course fulfilling multicultural requirement if not already completed4
Third of three specialization courses 4
 Credits 16-17
 Total Credits 48-51
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
Elective courses The fourth year may consist of elective courses, study abroad, or minor or certificate requirements (e.g., second-language acquisition and teaching). Study abroad may also take place in the third year, with those requirements moving to the fourth year.16
 Credits 16
Winter
Elective courses 16
 Credits 16
Spring
Elective courses Apply for graduation16
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

Solid preparation in linguistics is indispensable to any specialization at the graduate level. Although the courses deal with a variety of linguistic topics, three facets of linguistics are strongly emphasized in the graduate program:

  1. A pragmatic approach to the study of language structure and use, variation and change, and acquisition and learning
  2. An empirical, live-data, fieldwork, experimental, and cross-linguistic approach to the methodology of linguistic research
  3. Interdisciplinary emphasis on the place of human language in its wider natural context

Advising and Review Practices

Graduate students meet regularly with the departmental director of graduate studies. In addition, students are assigned a faculty member to advise them in the areas of their academic interest. The faculty reviews the performance of each graduate student at the end of each academic term. In case a student falls below what the faculty considers minimal standards of performance, a representative of the faculty notifies the student and suggests appropriate remedial steps.

Master of Arts

For those who intend to complete the PhD, the MA is not necessary and may delay completion of the advanced degree. While not necessary, the option of completing a terminal theoretical MA may be appropriate for some whose goals are, for example, professional work in a language community. Prospective students who are unsure which program would be appropriate are encouraged to consult with the department's director of graduate studies.

Prerequisites

Students may be required to take and pass (with grades of B– or better) certain prerequisite courses, typically an introductory course, such as Morphology and Syntax (LING 535) and Phonetics (LING 511).

Master of Arts Degree Requirements

Core Courses
LING 550Introduction to Phonology4
LING 551–552Functional Syntax I-II8
LING 507Seminar: [Topic]4
or LING 607 Seminar: [Topic]
LING 614Linguistic Theory: Phonology4
LING 615Linguistic Theory: Syntax4
LING 616Linguistic Theory: Semantics4
Elective Courses
Graduate-level linguistics or other relevant courses 120
Total Credits48
1

Select electives in consultation with department's director of graduate studies and the student's faculty advisor.

No course with a grade lower than B– may be used to satisfy degree requirements. 

Second-Language Requirement

Candidates for the MA are required to have taken at least two years of one second language within the past seven years. At the MA level, any foreign language is acceptable, including English for an international student whose first language is not English. It should be noted that the MA language may count toward the two language requirements for the PhD program if the language is used as a research language (see PhD requirements below).

MA Thesis or Substitute

Students in good standing may form an MA committee consisting of two linguistics faculty members who indicate their agreement to serve by signing a standard form and who share equal responsibility for directing the thesis. For the MA to be granted, both members of the committee must approve the thesis and the main content of the thesis must be presented as a departmental colloquium.

Students who elect not to write a thesis or who are unsuccessful in forming the two-member thesis committee may complete the degree by taking an additional 8 credits of course work approved by the director of graduate studies.

Specialization in Language Teaching

lts.uoregon.edu

The specialization in language teaching requires a background in basic linguistics and courses specifically designed for second-language teaching preparation.

Prerequisites

It is preferred that students should have a BS or BA degree in linguistics or a related field.

Master of Arts in Linguistics: Specialization in Language Teaching Degree Requirements

Required Courses
Seminar (chosen in consultation with advisor)4
LT 528Teaching English Culture and Literature4
LT 535Second-Language Teaching Methods4
LT 536Second-Language Teaching Planning4
LT 437Second-Language Teaching Practice4
LING 540Linguistic Principles and Second-Language Learning4
LT 541Teaching English Pronunciation4
LT 548Curriculum and Materials Development5
LT 549Testing and Assessment5
LING 594English Grammar4
LT 608Workshop: [Topic] (Computer-Assistant Language Learning, two terms)2
LT 608Workshop: [Topic] (Language Teaching Specialization Orientation)1
LT 611Terminal Project (two terms)7
Elective Courses
EDLD 510Experimental Course: [Topic] (Comparative Education)1-4
Elective courses 15
Total Credits58-61
1

Students who have already taken any of the required courses or their equivalents should replace them with elective course work in consultation with their advisor. 

Only graded courses may be used to satisfy degree requirements. Exceptions must be approved by the department. No course with a grade lower than B– may be used to satisfy degree requirements.

Master's Project

Students working toward an MA degree with the language-teaching specialization must complete a master's project over two consecutive terms. The project topic must be approved by the faculty advisor, and be presented in a Terminal Project (LT 611) class session during the final term.

Doctor of Philosophy

The doctor of philosophy (PhD) program in linguistics is individually tailored to meet the needs and professional goals of the student, drawing strong interdisciplinary support from related fields at the university. These fields may include—but are not limited to—anthropological linguistics, cognitive science, communication disorders and sciences, discourse and text analysis, English linguistics, first- and second-language acquisition, language-data processing, neurolinguistics, and sociolinguistics.

Residency Requirement

The Graduate School requires at least three years of full-time work beyond the bachelor’s degree for the doctorate, with at least one year spent in continuous residence on the Eugene campus. The Department of Linguistics interprets the latter requirement to mean that at least six courses, including seminars, must be taken in the program while the student is in continuous residence for three academic terms.

Doctoral Advisor

The department head appoints a doctoral advisor for each student upon admission to the PhD program.

Second-Year Review

By the end of a doctoral student’s second year,  he or she shall be given a review by the faculty members at a department meeting. Materials submitted by the student to the department for this review must include the following:

  1. A report that includes a research plan for the next year’s course work, potential topics for the two qualifying papers, a statement about the student’s career plans beyond the doctoral degree (and how the specific qualifying paper and thesis topics are relevant), and any other details worked out in consultation with the student’s advisor
  2. A curriculum vitae (CV)
  3. Written evidence of research progress and scholarly potential, such as a  substantive term paper or revision of a term paper that demonstrates excellence of original research or a linguistics master’s thesis; the materials must be submitted to the Department by April 15

Following review of these materials, the faculty members decides either to accept or deny the student for continued study in the PhD program. In some cases, a probation year may be granted for a student’s third year of study; the review process is repeated at the end of the third year with an accept outcome the only possibility for continued study.

As soon as possible after completion of the review, a letter to each graduate student under review is issued by the director of graduate studies informing the student of his or her status and, in the case of a one-year probation, specifying the conditions that must be met for a successful outcome during the additional third-year review. The language of the probation conditions is drafted by the student’s doctoral advisor and the director of graduate studies. The director may also meet with any students who are denied continued study or who are granted probation.

Annual review

Beginning in the third year of the program, each graduate student must submit an annual report and CV to his or her advisor by April 15 of each year. The report should be no more than one page in length and should detail what the student has accomplished over the past year in the program.

Doctoral Examination and Advancement to Candidacy

Requirements for the Qualifying Paper

The doctoral examination consists of two original publishable papers of substantial length and quality in different subfields of linguistics. The term “different subfields” may include two different methodological approaches to a single broad topic. A qualifying paper is considered publishable if the review committee deems it to stand a reasonable chance of acceptance by a refereed venue such as a peer-reviewed journal, although the paper itself is not required to be accepted for publication, and may be submitted to a nonrefereed venue.
An unmodified MA thesis cannot serve as one of the qualifying papers. A qualifying paper may be, however, a publishable expansion or revision of an MA thesis or publishable term paper written for a course conducted by any faculty member in the department or, where deemed reasonable, for a course conducted by a faculty member outside the department. The paper may be written under the supervision of either the student’s advisor or another faculty member in consultation with the student’s advisor, who approves the topic and the final version.
On submitting each paper to the committee, and after consultation with the student’s advisor, the student indicates in a cover note or e-mail to the coordinator the intended publication venue for the paper. In reviewing the paper, the committee takes into consideration the appropriateness of the proposed venue for the content of the paper.
Submission of both papers to the proposed venue or venues is required before the student can advance to candidacy. Before applying to the Graduate School for advancement to candidacy, the student must submit to the coordinator either his or her cover letter to the venue to which each of the two qualifying papers was sent or, in the case of invited publications, the invitation letter. The publishing venue may be a refereed journal, a refereed or nonrefereed conference proceedings volume, an online publication, or another venue. While submission of each qualifying paper to a publishing venue is required for advancement to candidacy, acceptance for publication is not a requirement.

Composition of the Qualifying Paper Committee

A committee of three faculty members is drawn up to review each qualifying paper. The committee is composed of two faculty member reviewers and the student’s doctoral advisor. In cases where the qualifying paper supervisor is not the student’s doctoral advisor, the doctoral advisor will be one of the two reviewers and the supervisor will be the third member of the committee.The advisor sits on both of an individual student’s committees, whereas at least one of the two faculty reviewers serves on only one of the two committees. One of the two faculty members on the committee may be from another department, where appropriate.
Upon completion and documented submission to a publisher of both qualifying papers and completion of all required course work and the research language requirement, the student advances to candidacy for the PhD degree. The student and the department must electronically submit the advancement to candidacy to the Graduate School for approval.

Qualifying Paper Coordinator and Reviewers

The qualifying paper coordinator is a member of the faculty who

  • receives papers submitted by the graduate student (after approval of the qualifying paper by the student’s doctoral advisor)
  • selects reviewers for the paper in consultation with the doctoral advisor
  • sends the paper to the reviewers and sets a deadline for review (typically six weeks)
  • receives the reviewers’ comments and decisions
  • sends a summary of the comments and decisions, together with the reviewers’ specific comments, to the doctoral advisor and the student
  • notifies the department when the qualifying paper is submitted and when it is accepted by the reviewers


In the event that one or both of the reviewers requests revisions, the student (after the doctoral advisor approves the revised version of the paper) submits the revision to the coordinator. A reviewer may choose whether or not to review the revised version. If a reviewer chooses to review the revision, the coordinator sends the revised version to the reviewer and sets a deadline for review (typically four weeks). Any further comments or revision requirements from the reviewer or reviewers are sent by the coordinator to the doctoral advisor and the student for further revision.
In the event that both reviewers reject a qualifying paper, the student may submit a substitute paper with the approval of the doctoral advisor. Except by petition to the faculty and subsequent faculty approval, there may be no third submission of a qualifying paper.

Doctoral Dissertation

A doctoral committee must include at least three linguistics faculty members and one outside member, and must be either chaired or cochaired by the student’s doctoral advisor in linguistics. A dissertation prospectus must be submitted to and approved by the doctoral committee before the writing of the dissertation commences. The PhD will be granted upon completion of the preceding requirements, the writing of an original dissertation acceptable to the doctoral committee, and an oral examination on the dissertation.

Required Courses
LING 614–616Linguistic Theory12
Select two of the following:5
Seminar: [Topic]
Seminar: [Topic]
Equivalent seminar courses
Select one of the following:15
Field Methods I-III
Sequence of courses in quantitative methods
Sequence of courses in philological methods
Combination of courses from two of these areas
Total Credits32

The course work must be approved by the student's doctoral advisor. Even those students who have already earned an MA degree are typically expected to complete all of the MA degree course work requirements at Oregon as part of the normal progress toward the PhD.

For each student, the specific course requirements in courses the student selects are to be determined by the student’s advisor and the department’s director of graduate studies, as are all other courses required for the PhD. No course with a grade lower than B– may be used to satisfy degree requirements. Candidates for the PhD must demonstrate proficiency equivalent to two years of college-level study of a second language and either proficiency equivalent to one year in a third research-related language or proficiency in programming or statistics in order to be advanced to candidacy.

Certificate in Second-Language Acquisition and Teaching

In collaboration with several UO departments, the Department of Linguistics offers an undergraduate certificate that focuses on the theory of second-language acquisition and teaching and its application in pedagogical settings. The certificate complements any other major. Specific course requirements may be found at slat.uoregon.edu.

Certificate Requirements

Three courses in second-language acquisition theory and language-teaching methodology12
Three courses in linguistic description of target language12
One practicum, internship, supervised tutoring2-4
Total Credits26-28

Additional Requirements

College-level second-language study (two years of any second language if the certificate target language is English; three years for any other target language).

Courses

Course usage information

LT 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Various languages offered through the Yamada Language Center. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

LT 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LT 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable four times for a maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

LT 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable twice for a maximum of 8 credits.

Course usage information

LT 409. Supervised Tutoring. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable twice for a maximum of 8 credits.

Course usage information

LT 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-8 Credits.

Repeatable twice for a maximum of 8 credits.

Course usage information

LT 428. Teaching English Culture and Literature. 4 Credits.

The interaction between language and culture as it relates to second-language teaching. Application to the teaching of literature.

Course usage information

LT 435. Second-Language Teaching Methods. 4 Credits.

Approaches and methods in teaching second languages. Theoretical and pedagogical principles of language teaching, including a focus on language skills. Sequence with LT 436/536, 437/537.
Prereq: LING 440

Course usage information

LT 436. Second-Language Teaching Planning. 4 Credits.

Application of teaching principles and practices in teaching instruction. Practical techniques for developing skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing second languages. Sequence with LT 435/535, 437/537.
Prereq: LING 440 or 444; LT 435 with a C– or better.

Course usage information

LT 437. Second-Language Teaching Practice. 4 Credits.

Intensive workshop and practice in language instruction. Team-teaching of weekly English as a spoken language course including designing activities and creating materials. Sequence with LT 435/535, 436/536.
Prereq: LT 435. Pre- or coreq: LT 436.

Course usage information

LT 441. Teaching English Pronunciation. 4 Credits.

Introduction to English phonetics and phonology, methods for teaching pronunciation, lesson plan development, and practice teaching.

Course usage information

LT 448. Curriculum and Materials Development. 5 Credits.

Introduction to elements of curriculum design and related materials development. Development and implementation of language curriculum. Practical application.
Prereq: LT 436/536.

Course usage information

LT 449. Testing and Assessment. 5 Credits.

Principles and types of language testing; focuses on classroom testing, test design and integration into curriculum, and test planning for teaching situations.
Prereq: LT 436/536.

Course usage information

LT 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable twice for a maximum of 8 credits.

Course usage information

LT 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-8 Credits.

Repeatable twice for a maximum of 8 credits.

Course usage information

LT 528. Teaching English Culture and Literature. 4 Credits.

The interaction between language and culture as it relates to second-language teaching. Application to the teaching of literature.

Course usage information

LT 535. Second-Language Teaching Methods. 4 Credits.

Approaches and methods in teaching second languages. Theoretical and pedagogical principles of language teaching, including a focus on language skills. Sequence with LT 436/536, 437/537.
Prereq: LING 540.

Course usage information

LT 536. Second-Language Teaching Planning. 4 Credits.

Application of teaching principles and practices in teaching instruction. Practical techniques for developing skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing second languages. Sequence with LT 435/535, 437/537.
Prereq: LING 540 or 544; LT 535 with a B– or better.

Course usage information

LT 537. Second-Language Teaching Practice. 4 Credits.

Intensive workshop and practice in language instruction. Team-teaching of weekly English as a spoken language course including designing activities and creating materials. Sequence with LT 435/535, 436/536.
Prereq: LT 535. Pre- or coreq: LT 536

Course usage information

LT 541. Teaching English Pronunciation. 4 Credits.

Introduction to English phonetics and phonology, methods for teaching pronunciation, lesson plan development, and practice teaching.

Course usage information

LT 548. Curriculum and Materials Development. 5 Credits.

Introduction to elements of curriculum design and related materials development. Development and implementation of language curriculum. Practical application.
Prereq: LT 436/536.

Course usage information

LT 549. Testing and Assessment. 5 Credits.

Principles and types of language testing; focuses on classroom testing, test design and integration into curriculum, and test planning for teaching situations.
Prereq: LT 436/536.

Course usage information

LT 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable five times for a maximum of 21 credits.

Course usage information

LT 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable five times for a maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

LT 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable five times for a maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

LT 609. Supervised Tutoring. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable twice for a maximum of 8 credits.

Course usage information

LT 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable twice for a maximum of 8 credits.

Course usage information

LT 611. Terminal Project. 1-7 Credits.

Two-term course required to complete an MA in language teaching specialization. Individual projects. Weekly group sessions provide guidance. Repeatable once for a maximum of 7 credits.
Prereq: LT 536.

Course usage information

LT 629. Foundations in Language Theory. 4 Credits.

Provides a foundation in linguistic theory, sociolinguistics, and language acquisition for teachers assisting language-minority students.

Courses

Course usage information

LING 101. Introduction to Language. 4 Credits.

Nontechnical introduction to language. Issues of general concern such as language attitudes; language and legislation, nationalism, gender; language learning; and human language versus animal communication.

Course usage information

LING 150. Structure of English Words. 4 Credits.

Word structure and derivation in English Greek- and Latin-derived vocabulary; Germanic- and Romance-derived derivational rules. Understanding the dynamic structure of the English lexicon; prefixes, suffixes, and morphology.

Course usage information

LING 196. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 198. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 201. Language and Power. 4 Credits.

Explores the nature of language, dialects, accents, and multilingualism, and relates these to issues of political, educational, and other forms of social power.

Course usage information

LING 211. Languages of the World. 4 Credits.

Survey of the variability and distribution of the languages of the world in terms of linguistic typology, genetic relationships, and geographic location.

Course usage information

LING 294. Child Language. 4 Credits.

Systematic survey of language structure and representation presented through the lens of language acquisition. Sounds, words, phrases, discourse, and pragmatics in typically and atypically developing children.

Course usage information

LING 296. Language and Society in the United States. 4 Credits.

English and non-English language diversity in the U.S., including regional varieties, African American English, Latino English. Explores language and social structure, policy, and educational issues.

Course usage information

LING 297. Introduction to Bilingualism. 4 Credits.

The linguistic, cognitive, cultural, and social dimensions of individual and societal bilingualism, which dispel common myths about the way bilinguals develop and use their two or more languages.

Course usage information

LING 301. Introduction to Linguistics Analysis. 4 Credits.

Study of human language and linguistics as a scientific and humanistic discipline. Lexicon, phonology, syntax, semantics, language change. Basic analytic techniques for drawing linguistic generalizations.

Course usage information

LING 302. Introduction to Linguistic Behavior. 4 Credits.

Study of language as a human behavior, focusing on developmental, cognitive, and social aspects of language use. Theories and methods involved in empirical, quantitative linguistics.

Course usage information

LING 396. Language and Cognition. 4 Credits.

How human thought is coded by language. Topics include meaning, categorization; linguistic units and speech behavior; language use and memory; language comprehension and production.

Course usage information

LING 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 406. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include history of linguistics, language contact, morphology, discourse pragmatics, conversational analysis, acoustic phonetics, psycholinguistics, language acquisition, applied linguistics..

Course usage information

LING 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 409. Supervised Tutoring. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 411. Phonetics. 4 Credits.

The articulatory and acoustic basis for understanding the production and perception of speech sounds; relevance of this phonetic base to phonological analysis.
Pre- or coreq: LING 301 passed with a grade of C- or better.

Course usage information

LING 415. Semantics. 4 Credits.

Survey of the fundamentals of semantic theory from traditional formal logic to modern cognitive approaches. Additional coverage of fundamental notions in pragmatics.
Prereq: LING 301 passed with a grade of C- or better.

Course usage information

LING 423. Fieldwork Methods and Ethics. 4 Credits.

Qualitative methodology in cross-cultural fieldwork from an interdisciplinary perspective. Ethics and techniques in preparation for the field, field relations, leaving the field.

Course usage information

LING 432. Pathology of Language. 4 Credits.

Examines the language symptoms of aphasia, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurological and psychiatric conditions from a neurolinguistic perspective.
Prereq: LING 301 or CDS 210 passed with a grade of C- or better.

Course usage information

LING 435. Morphology and Syntax. 4 Credits.

Methods of determining the morphological and syntactic patterns of natural language data, with introduction to typological and theoretical issues in morphology.
Prereq: LING 301 passed with a grade of C- or better.

Course usage information

LING 440. Linguistic Principles and Second-Language Learning. 4 Credits.

Introduction to how languages are learned in school contexts; underlying human language principles. Special attention to learning issues that classroom teachers need to address. Students cannot receive credit for both LING 440 and 444.

Course usage information

LING 444. Second-Language Acquisition. 4 Credits.

Introduction to cognitive and social processes of acquiring second languages. Students cannot receive credit for both LING 440/LING 540 and LING 444/LING 544.

Course usage information

LING 450. Introduction to Phonology. 4 Credits.

Study of sound systems in language. Phonemic contrasts, allophonic variation, and complementary distribution in relation to lexical coding of words,phonological processes operating at the segmental and suprasegmental levels.
Prereq: LING 411 passed with a grade of C- or better.

Course usage information

LING 451. Functional Syntax I. 4 Credits.

Syntax within grammar; its interaction with lexical meaning, propositional semantics, and discourse pragmatics; syntactic structure; case roles; word order; grammatical morphology; tense, aspect, modality, and negation; definiteness and referentiality.
Prereq: LING 435 passed with a grade of C- or better.

Course usage information

LING 452. Functional Syntax II. 4 Credits.

Complex syntactic structures and their discourse function; embedded, coordinate, and subordinate clauses; nondeclarative speech acts, topicalization, contrast, and focusing; transitivization and detransitivization.
Prereq: LING 451 passed with a grade of C- or better.

Course usage information

LING 460. Historical and Comparative Linguistics. 4 Credits.

Principles of language change and the methods of comparative and internal reconstruction; typological change in phonology, morphology, and syntax; language families and protolanguages.
Prereq: LING 450 with a grade of C- or better.

Course usage information

LING 491. Sociolinguistics. 4 Credits.

Major approaches and frameworks to the study of sociolinguistics; social-cultural variation in language use and its relationship to change; attitudes about variations, multilingualism.
Prereq: LING 301.

Course usage information

LING 493. Corpus Linguistics. 4 Credits.

Corpus-based approaches to the study of natural, human language, focusing on the use of computer-based methods to conduct empirical analyses of written and spoken language. Developing skills in computer programming for linguistic analysis.
Prereq: Ling 301, 302.

Course usage information

LING 494. English Grammar. 4 Credits.

Survey of grammatical, syntactic, and morphological structures of English in terms of semantic and functional criteria. Students cannot receive credit for both ENG 209 and LING 494.

Course usage information

LING 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include history of linguistics, language contact, morphology, discourse pragmatics, conversational analysis.

Course usage information

LING 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 511. Phonetics. 4 Credits.

The articulatory and acoustic basis for understanding the production and perception of speech sounds; relevance of this phonetic base to phonological analysis.

Course usage information

LING 515. Semantics. 4 Credits.

Survey of the fundamentals of semantic theory from traditional formal logic to modern cognitive approaches. Additional coverage of fundamental notions in pragmatics.

Course usage information

LING 523. Fieldwork Methods and Ethics. 4 Credits.

Qualitative methodology in cross-cultural fieldwork from an interdisciplinary perspective. Ethics and techniques in preparation for the field, field relations, leaving the field.

Course usage information

LING 532. Pathology of Language. 4 Credits.

Examines the language symptoms of aphasia, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurological and psychiatric conditions from a neurolinguistic perspective.

Course usage information

LING 535. Morphology and Syntax. 4 Credits.

Methods of determining the morphological and syntactic patterns of natural language data, with introduction to typological and theoretical issues in morphology.

Course usage information

LING 540. Linguistic Principles and Second-Language Learning. 4 Credits.

Introduction to how languages are learned in school contexts; underlying human language principles. Special attention to learning issues that classroom teachers need to address. Students cannot receive credit for both LING 440/540 and 444/544.

Course usage information

LING 544. Second-Language Acquisition. 4 Credits.

Introduction to cognitive and social processes of acquiring second languages. Students cannot receive credit for both LING 440/LING 540 and LING 444/LING 544.

Course usage information

LING 550. Introduction to Phonology. 4 Credits.

Study of sound systems in language. Phonemic contrasts, allophonic variation, and complementary distribution in relation to lexical coding of words,phonological processes operating at the segmental and suprasegmental levels.

Course usage information

LING 551. Functional Syntax I. 4 Credits.

Syntax within grammar; its interaction with lexical meaning, propositional semantics, and discourse pragmatics; syntactic structure; case roles; word order; grammatical morphology; tense, aspect, modality, and negation; definiteness and referentiality.

Course usage information

LING 552. Functional Syntax II. 4 Credits.

Complex syntactic structures and their discourse function; embedded, coordinate, and subordinate clauses; nondeclarative speech acts, topicalization, contrast, and focusing; transitivization and detransitivization.

Course usage information

LING 560. Historical and Comparative Linguistics. 4 Credits.

Principles of language change and the methods of comparative and internal reconstruction; typological change in phonology, morphology, and syntax; language families and protolanguages.

Course usage information

LING 591. Sociolinguistics. 4 Credits.

Major approaches and frameworks to the study of sociolinguistics; social-cultural variation in language use and its relationship to change; attitudes about variations, multilingualism.

Course usage information

LING 593. Corpus Linguistics. 4 Credits.

Corpus-based approaches to the study of natural, human language, focusing on the use of computer-based methods to conduct empirical analyses of written and spoken language. Developing skills in computer programming for linguistic analysis.

Course usage information

LING 594. English Grammar. 4 Credits.

Survey of grammatical, syntactic, and morphological structures of English in terms of semantic and functional criteria.

Course usage information

LING 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 602. Supervised Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include syntax, semantics, discourse pragmatics, stylistics, psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics.
Prereq: LING 450/550, 452/552.

Course usage information

LING 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-8 Credits.


Prereq: LT 445/545.

Course usage information

LING 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

LING 614. Linguistic Theory: Phonology. 4 Credits.

Detailed investigation of phonological theory with emphasis on experimental evidence. Topics may include sound systems and their typology, morphophonology, and the acquisition of phonological structures.
Prereq: LING 450/550.

Course usage information

LING 615. Linguistic Theory: Syntax. 4 Credits.

Issues in syntactic theory. Topics may include universals of semantic, pragmatic, and discourse function and their relation to syntax, syntactic typology and universals, formal models in syntactic description.
Prereq: LING 452/552.

Course usage information

LING 616. Linguistic Theory: Semantics. 4 Credits.

Detailed investigation of issues in semantic and pragmatic theory. Topics may include universals of lexical semantics and discourse pragmatics and their interaction.
Prereq: LING 415/515.

Course usage information

LING 617. Field Methods I. 5 Credits.

Supervised linguistics fieldwork with language speakers, both in and out of class. Application of language universals to the elicitation, analysis, and evaluation of data from particular languages; the writing of phonological, lexical, and grammatical descriptions; sentence versus text elicitation. Sequence.
Prereq: LING 450/550, 452/552.

Course usage information

LING 618. Field Methods II. 5 Credits.

Supervised linguistics fieldwork with language speakers, both in and out of class. Application of language universals to the elicitation, analysis, and evaluation of data from particular languages; the writing of phonological, lexical, and grammatical descriptions; sentence versus text elicitation. Sequence.
Prereq: LING 617.

Course usage information

LING 619. Field Methods III. 5 Credits.

Supervised linguistics fieldwork with language speakers, both in and out of class. Application of language universals to the elicitation, analysis, and evaluation of data from particular languages; the writing of phonological, lexical, and grammatical descriptions; sentence versus text elicitation. Sequence.
Prereq: LING 618.

Course usage information

LING 621. Empirical Methods in Linguistics. 4 Credits.

Empirical quantified methods of data collection and analysis; statistical evaluation of results. Data derived from discourse, conversation, psycholinguistics, first- and second-language acquisition, speech pathology, speech and writing deficiencies.
Prereq: LING 450/550, 452/552.

Course usage information

LING 622. Discourse Analysis. 4 Credits.

Language beyond the sentence level; elicitation and analysis of oral and written texts; quantitative text analysis. Information structure of discourse, discourse and syntax, conversational analysis, discourse pragmatics, discourse processing.
Prereq: LING 4/552.

Course usage information

LING 644. Advanced Second-Language Acquisition. 4 Credits.

Characterization of major theoretical frameworks from which to view second-language acquisition issues and research paradigms associated with each framework.

Course usage information

LING 660. Historical Syntax. 4 Credits.

Topics in the study of syntactic change.
Prereq: LING 452/552, 460/560 or equivalent.

Courses

Course usage information

SWAH 101. First Year Swahili. 5 Credits.

Introduction to Swahili with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing and comprehension. Sequence: SWAH 102 and 103.

Course usage information

SWAH 102. First-Year Swahili. 5 Credits.

Introduction to Swahili with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension. Sequence: SWAH 101 and 103.
Prereq: SWAH 101 or equivalent.

Course usage information

SWAH 103. First-Year Swahili. 5 Credits.

Introduction to Swahili with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension. Sequence: SWAH 101 and 102.
Prereq: SWAH 102.

Course usage information

SWAH 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SWAH 201. Second-Year Swahili. 5 Credits.

Continued development of Swahili language skills with emphasis on African culture. Sequence with SWAH 202, 203.
Prereq: SWAH 103 or equivalent.

Course usage information

SWAH 202. Second-Year Swahili. 5 Credits.

Continued development of Swahili language skills with emphasis on African culture. Sequence with SWAH 201, 203.
Prereq: SWAH 201 or equivalent.

Course usage information

SWAH 203. Second Year Swahili. 5 Credits.

Continued development of Swahili language skills with emphasis on African culture. Sequence with SWAH 201, 202.
Prereq: SWAH 202.

Course usage information

SWAH 301. Advanced Swahili. 5 Credits.

Explores the noun class system, nominalization, styles in language use, genres, and literary devices; vowel system including vowel extensions; idioms; specialized language. Sequence with SWAH 302, 303.
Prereq: SWAH 203 or equivalent.

Course usage information

SWAH 302. Contemporary Swahili Literature. 4 Credits.

Survey of popular modern Swahili literature including the novel, the play, and Ushairi poetry. Series with SWAH 301, SWAH 303.
Prereq: SWAH 203.

Course usage information

SWAH 303. Language and Culture: Swahili Nation. 5 Credits.

Critical look at the origins, development, and expansion of Swahili including its sociology, use, and importance in the modern Swahili nation. Sequence with SWAH 301, 302.
Prereq: SWAH 302.

Course usage information

SWAH 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SWAH 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.