Political Science

http://polisci.uoregon.edu

Craig Parsons, Department Head
541-346-4864
541-346-4860 fax
936 Prince Lucien Campbell Hall
1284 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-1284
polisci@uoregon.edu

The Department of Political Science offers a broad range of courses. For undergraduates, three 100-level courses cover foundational knowledge and skills, and six 200-level courses serve as “gateways” to career paths that organize the upper-division curriculum: public policy and political action; politics, law, and justice; politics of business; global engagement; sustainability, development, and social action; and ethics, identity, and society. For graduate study, the department offers training in six traditional subfields of political science, each with their own designated faculty members: comparative politics, formal theory and methodology, international relations, public policy, political theory, and United States politics. Faculty members employ varied theoretical and methodological approaches but share the pursuit of answers to questions with real-world implications.

Careers

An undergraduate degree in political science provides a strong foundation for any number of career choices. The program has been designed to develop in students a concrete set skills—critical thinking, analytical abilities, writing proficiency, and precise communication.

Majors are encouraged to select course work that aligns with their career goals. Students begin with a 200-level introductory course, then develop and refine skills in upper-division courses.

The department offers credit for internships related to political science and a workshop to explore and prepare students for the job market. For more information, visit polisci.uoregon.edu/internship-careers.

Political science graduates may also continue on to graduate education, especially in the fields of law, international studies, business administration, or advanced studies in political science.

Faculty

Yvette Alex-Assensoh, professor (immigration, racial politics): vice president for equity and inclusion. BA, 1988, Columbia; MA, 1991, PhD, 1993, Ohio State; JD, 2006, Indiana, Bloomington. (2012)

Gerald Berk, professor (American politics, political development, political economy). BA, 1977, Clark; PhD, 1987, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (1994)

Erin Beck, associate professor (Latin American politics; micropolitics; women, gender, and development). BA, 2004, Providence College; MA, 2007, PhD, 2012, Brown. (2012)

Anita Chari, associate professor (political theory). BA, 2001, Georgetown; MA, 2003, PhD, 2008, Chicago. (2010)

James Conran, assistant professor (comparative politics, European politics, political economy). BA, 2006, University College, Dublin; MSc, 2008, London School of Economics and Political Science; PhD, 2017, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (2017)

Jane K. Cramer, associate professor (international relations, international security, U.S. foreign policy). BA, 1986, Oberlin; PhD, 2002, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (2000)

Dennis C. Galvan, professor (Africa, development, comparative politics); vice provost for international affairs. See International Studies.

Alison Gash, associate professor (public law). BA, 1995, Vassar College; MPA-URP, 2000, Princeton; MA, 2004, PhD, 2010, California, Berkeley. (2010)

Burke Hendrix, associate professor (normative political theory, indigenous politics, global justice). BA, 1992, Linfield College; MA, 2000, PhD, 2002, Colorado, Boulder. (2012)

Craig Kauffman, associate professor (environmental politics, global governance, democratization). BA, 1992, College of Wooster; MS, 1996, George Mason; PhD, 2012, George Washington. (2012)

Joseph E. Lowndes, associate professor (U.S. politics). BA, 1990, Antioch College; MA, 1996, New School for Social Research; PhD, 2004, New School University. (2003)

Ronald B. Mitchell, professor (environmental politics, international relations). BA, 1981, Stanford; MPP, 1985, PhD, 1992, Harvard. (1993)

Mikhail Myagkov, professor (comparative politics, formal political theory). BS, 1990, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology; MS, 1994, PhD, 1996, California Institute of Technology. (1996) 

Craig Parsons, professor (comparative politics, European politics). BA, 1992, Stanford; CEP, 1993 Institut d’Etudes Politiques; MA, 1994, PhD, 1999, California, Berkeley. (2004) 

Lars Skalnes, associate professor (international political economy, international relations). CandMag, 1984, Bergen; MA, 1989, PhD, 1993, California, Los Angeles. (1992) 

Priscilla Southwell, professor (political behavior, U.S. and European politics). BA, 1974, MA, 1977, Colorado; PhD, 1983, North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (1981)

Yeling Tan, assistant professor (international and comparative political economy, global economic governance, politics of China). BA, 2002, Stanford; MPA, 2011, PhD, 2017, Harvard. (2017)

William Terry, assistant professor (U.S. politics, statistical analysis, formal political theory). BA, 2002, Washington (St. Louis); MS, 2004, California Institute of Technology; PhD, 2010, California, San Diego. (2012)

Daniel Tichenor, professor (American presidency, interest groups and social movements, US political institutions); Philip H. Knight Chair. BA, 1988, Earlham College; PhD, 1996, Brandeis. (2008)

Tuong Vu, professor (comparative politics, political economy of Southeast Asia). BA, 1987, Vietnam National, Ho Chi Minh City; BA, 1994, Minnesota, Twin Cities; MPA, 1997, Princeton; PhD, 2004, California, Berkeley. (2007)

Priscilla Yamin, associate professor (U.S. politics and history, gender studies, feminist theory). BA, 1990, Wisconsin, Madison; MA, 1996, PhD, 2005, New School for Social Research. (2007)

Emeriti

William H. Baugh, associate professor emeritus. SB, 1963, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; MS, 1965, Rochester; MA, 1971, PhD, 1973, Indiana. (1978)

Deborah Baumgold, professor emerita. BA, 1971, Oberlin; MA, 1975, PhD, 1980, Princeton. (1987)

Daniel Goldrich, professor emeritus. BA, 1955, Antioch; MA, 1957, PhD, 1959, North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (1963)

Arthur M. Hanhardt Jr., professor emeritus . BA, 1953, Rochester; M.A, 1958, Colgate; Ph.D, 1963, Northwestern. (1963)

Richard Kraus, professor emeritus. BA, 1966, Grinnell; certificate (East Asian Institute), 1969, MA, 1969, PhD, 1974, Columbia. (1983)

Jerry F. Medler, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1963, Northwestern; MA, 1965, PhD, 1966, Oregon. (1968)

John M. Orbell, professor emeritus. BA, 1957, MA, 1960, New Zealand; PhD, 1965, North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (1967)

Richard P. Suttmeier, professor emeritus. AB, 1963, Dartmouth College; PhD, 1969, Indiana. (1990)

M. George Zaninovich, professor emeritus. BA, 1953, MA, 1959, PhD, 1964, Stanford. (1966)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

The Department of Political Science offers a program leading to a bachelor of science (BS) or a bachelor of arts (BA) degree. This program is designed to

  1. provide students with substantive expertise in political institutions, key policy issues, salient ideologies, law and regulation, and political identities in local, national, and global contexts
  2. prepare students for graduate work or professional careers in law, business, government, teaching, journalism, social activism, or the academic community

Bachelor's Degree

Courses at the 100 and 200 levels are introductory, setting foundations for the major. Courses at the 300 and 400 level build students’ expertise in selected career paths, with 300-level courses typically in lecture format and 400-level courses typically in seminar format. A minimum of 32 credits must be upper division.

At the discretion of the instructor, certain 300- and 400-level courses may have prerequisites. Students are advised to complete foundational lower-division requirements prior to taking upper-division courses, especially at the 400 level.

Undergraduate majors who complete a 200-level introductory course and four upper-division courses in a career path earn a certificate of completion, adding documented expertise to their degree.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Two 100-level courses8
Two 200-level courses8
Course in political theory (any level) 14
Two 400-level courses 28
Additional upper-division courses 3,420
Total Credits48

Additional Requirements

The 48 credits that satisfy major requirements must be taken for letter grades and passed with C– or better with the exception that one course (as many as 4 credits) may be taken pass/no pass (P/N). Courses such as Thesis (PS 403) and Honors Thesis Prospectus (PS 411) are offered pass/no pass only and may be applied to the 48 credits. Credits earned in Practicum: [Topic] (PS 409) may not be applied to the major.

No more than a total of 16 credits in Research: [Topic] (PS 401), Thesis (PS 403), Internship: [Topic] (PS 404), Reading and Conference: [Topic] (PS 405), Workshop: [Topic] (PS 408), Honors Thesis Prospectus (PS 411), and Overseas Study: Internships (OINT 488) may be applied toward the 48-credit requirement. Overseas Study: Internships (OINT 488) is subject to preapproval by the political science department.

No more than 8 credits of Internship: [Topic] (PS 404) or Overseas Study: Internships (OINT 488) may be applied toward the 48 credits. This work must be done under the direction of a faculty member who, prior to registration, must approve and set up academic criteria to evaluate the work. Credit for these courses must be earned at the University of Oregon.

UO bachelor's degree requirements also apply.

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

Two 100-level courses8
Two 200-level courses8
Course in political theory (any level) 14
Two 400-level courses 28
Additional upper-division courses 3,420
Total Credits48

Additional Requirements

The 48 credits that satisfy major requirements must be taken for letter grades and passed with C– or better with the exception that one course (as many as 4 credits) may be taken pass/no pass (P/N). Courses such as Thesis (PS 403) and Honors Thesis Prospectus (PS 411) are offered pass/no pass only and may be applied to the 48 credits. Credits earned in Practicum: [Topic] (PS 409) may not be applied to the major.

No more than a total of 16 credits in Research: [Topic] (PS 401), Thesis (PS 403), Internship: [Topic] (PS 404), Reading and Conference: [Topic] (PS 405), Workshop: [Topic] (PS 408), Honors Thesis Prospectus (PS 411), and Overseas Study: Internships (OINT 488) may be applied toward the 48-credit requirement. Overseas Study: Internships (OINT 488) is subject to preapproval by the political science department.

No more than 8 credits of Internship: [Topic] (PS 404) or Overseas Study: Internships (OINT 488) may be applied toward the 48 credits. This work must be done under the direction of a faculty member who, prior to registration, must approve and set up academic criteria to evaluate the work. Credit for these courses must be earned at the University of Oregon.

UO bachelor's degree requirements also apply.

Freshmen and Transfer Students

There are no departmental requirements for entering freshmen. Students planning to transfer to the university from two-year colleges should take the basic introductory political science courses offered at those institutions. At least 20 credits in upper-division graded political science courses must be completed in residence at the University of Oregon to qualify for a BA or BS degree in political science. Transfer students should consult the department office regarding credits toward the major and fulfilling lower-division requirements. In all cases, students are required to fulfill the equivalent of 48 credits for the major.

Second Bachelor’s Degree or Second Major

Students who want to earn a second bachelor’s degree or a second or double major in political science must complete 48 credits in political science, as outlined under Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements or Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements. Students who are considering a second bachelor's degree and have prior political science credits should consult with the undergraduate advisor, John Davidson. Some of these prior credits may not be applicable to the second bachelor's degree.

Honors in Political Science

Political science majors who have reached junior standing and meet GPA minimums are eligible to graduate with honors. The honors program spans the spring term of a student’s junior year to the spring term of the senior year. GPA minimums must be maintained to participate—an overall grade point average for UO and transfer credits of at least 3.50, plus a 3.70 GPA or above in the political science major. Students must successfully complete Honors Thesis Prospectus (PS 411) during fall term of the academic year in which the thesis is completed, then complete 4 credits in Thesis (PS 403) in the following winter term. Honors students select a thesis advisor and reader; the advisor supervises and grades the thesis course. The thesis advisor and reader determines if the thesis is approved for honors distinction after eligibility is determined prior to graduation.

Minor Requirements

Political science courses8
Upper-division political science courses 116
Total Credits24

All credits must be taken for letter grades and passed with grades of C– or better. As many as 8 credits may be transferred from another institution.

Thesis (PS 403), Internship: [Topic] (PS 404), Practicum: [Topic] (PS 409), Honors Thesis Prospectus (PS 411), and Overseas Study: Internships (OINT 488) do not count toward the minor. The minor in political science does not have a subfield requirement.

Kindergarten through Secondary Teaching Careers

Students who complete a degree with a major in political science are eligible to apply to the College of Education’s fifth-year licensure program in middle-secondary teaching or the fifth-year licensure program in elementary teaching. More information is available in the College of Education section of this catalog.

 

Four-Year Degree Plan

Bachelor of Arts in Political Science

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
WR 121 College Composition I 4
100-level course with PS subject code 4
First term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education arts and letters group-satisfying course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 4
WR 122
College Composition II
or College Composition III
4
General-education course in science 4
100-level course with PS subject code 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education science group-satisfying course 4
Multicultural course in American cultures or international cultures 4
200-level course with PS subject code 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
200-level course with PS subject code 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
Course in political theory 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Third term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
300-level course with PS subject code 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
General-education science group-satisfying course 4
300-level course with PS subject code 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course Consider pursuing an internship. Students may receive credit for internship participation in PS 404. See eligibility details at polisci.uoregon.edu.4
 Credits 16
Winter
Multicultural course in American cultures or international cultures 4
General-education course in science 4
300- to 400-level courses with PS subject code 8
 Credits 16
Spring
300- to 400-level courses with PS subject code Consider applying for the honors program. See eligibility details at polisci.uoregon.edu.8
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
400-level course with PS subject code 4
Elective courses Enroll in PS 411 if participating in the honors program.12
 Credits 16
Winter
400-level course with PS subject code 4
Elective courses Enroll in PS 403 if participating in the honors program.12
 Credits 16
Spring
Elective courses Apply to graduate by the fifth week 16
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

Bachelor of Science in Political Science

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
MATH 106 University Mathematics II 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
100-level course with PS subject code 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
Winter
MATH 107 University Mathematics III 4
WR 122
College Composition II
or College Composition III
4
100-level course with PS subject code 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 16
Spring
MATH 111 College Algebra 4
200-level course with PS subject code 4
General-education course in science 4
Multicultural course in American cultures or international cultures 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
200-level course with PS subject code 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education courses in social science 8
 Credits 16
Winter
Course in political theory 4
Multicultural course in American cultures or international cultures 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 16
Spring
300-level course with PS subject code 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
Upper-division course with PS subject code 4
300-level course with PS subject code 4
General-education course in science 4
Elective course Consider pursuing an internship. Students may receive credit for internship participation in PS 406. See eligibility details at polisci.uoregon.edu.4
 Credits 16
Winter
300- to 400-level courses with PS subject code  
General-education course in science 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 8
Spring
400-level courses with PS subject code Consider applying for the honors program. See eligibility details at polisci.uoregon.edu.8
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 40
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
400-level course with PS subject code 4
Elective courses Enroll in PS 411 if participating in the honors program.12
 Credits 16
Winter
400-level course with PS subject code 4
Elective courses Enroll in PS 403 if participating in the honors program.12
 Credits 16
Spring
Elective courses Apply to graduate by the fifth week16
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48

The Department of Political Science offers a graduate program of studies leading to the master of arts (MA), master of science (MS), and doctor of philosophy (PhD) degrees. The program is designed to prepare students for teaching, research, and government or other public service, and to enable them to understand and participate in public affairs.

Members of the faculty offer advanced courses and seminars across the major fields of political science. Graduate student participation in joint faculty-student research and interdepartmental research projects is common on a wide range of topics.

Admission

Applications for the master’s and doctoral programs are submitted online and consist of the following documents:

  1. Official transcripts; successful applicants usually have a grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 or higher for all undergraduate and graduate academic work
  2. Official scores on the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) taken within the last five years; successful applicants usually have a combined verbal and quantitative score of 300 or better
  3. International students from non-English-speaking countries must provide proof of English language proficiency by submitting results from one of the following:
    1. Official English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) test results taken within the last two years. A minimum score of 575 (paper-based) or 88 (internet-based) is required
    2. Official International English Language Testing System (IELTS) test results taken within the last two years with a minimum score of 7.0
    3. A transcript showing the applicant has received a bachelor’s degree or higher from an accredited US institution or from an institution in the following countries: Australia, Canada (excluding Quebec), Ireland, New Zealand, or the United Kingdom
  4. A statement of purpose prepared by the student
  5. Recommendations from at least three teachers from whom courses have been taken, or from practitioners in your expected field of study
  6. Other evidence that may be helpful in reaching a decision. Although an undergraduate major in political science is not a prerequisite for admission, the committee takes into consideration previous academic work in political science

Information about the graduate program, graduate employee appointments, and application process may be obtained by visiting the department’s website. The deadline for fall term admission and graduate employee appointment applications is February 1.

Master’s Degree Program

The master’s degree program prepares students for professional careers in teaching and research. Two years is the typical period for completing the program.

Master of Arts Degree Requirements

  • Completion of 45 credits of graduate course work
  • Completion of required courses as specified by the department
  • Demonstrated proficiency in qualitative and quantitative research methods
  • Completion of a master’s degree thesis

Master of Science Degree Requirements

  • Completion of 45 credits of graduate course work
  • Completion of required courses as specified by the department
  • Demonstrated proficiency in qualitative and quantitative research methods
  • Completion of a master’s degree thesis

See the Graduate School section of this catalog for the distinction between MS and MA degree requirements.

Doctoral Program

This program is designed to allow the well-prepared student to complete course requirements for the PhD in two years of full-time study. Students complete a research paper in their second year and take comprehensive examinations during their third year, followed by preparation of a dissertation. Requirements for the PhD in political science include the following: 

  1. Completion of 100 credits (18 credits are for dissertation) beyond the bachelor’s degree. Research: [Topic] (PS 601) and Reading and Conference: [Topic] (PS 605) may be taken pass/no pass. All other course work must be taken for letter grades
  2. Completion of State of the Discipline (PS 620), to be taken the first time it is offered
  3. Demonstrated proficiency in quantitative and qualitative research methods
  4. Completion of a research paper no later than the sixth term of enrollment (excluding summer)
  5. Completion of required seminars in the two area fields in which the student takes comprehensive examinations. Students should take these seminars as early as possible, and prior to examination
  6. Passing two comprehensive examinations: one major field and one minor field, selected from the list below. Each field comprises several themes from which the student must choose a subset
    • classical and contemporary political theory
    • comparative politics
    • formal theory and methodology
    • international relations
    • public policy
    • United States politics
  7. After passing the comprehensive examinations, completion of 18 credits in Dissertation (PS 603), to be taken while completing the PhD dissertation
  8. Defense of the written dissertation in an oral examination

A complete description of graduate requirements, including an explanation of themes and field requirements, is available on the department website.

Courses

Course usage information

PS 100. Temporary Group-Satisfying Course. 4 Credits.

Course usage information

PS 102. Thinking Like a Social Scientist. 4 Credits.

Illustrates how the ways social scientists think—using quantitative, qualitative, and interpretive methods—help to sharpen thinking for many contexts and careers.

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PS 106. Power, Politics, and Inequality. 4 Credits.

Examines power and politics through the lens of inequality, focusing on the constant struggle between the haves and the have-nots.

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PS 109. Politics, Science, and the Body. 4 Credits.

An interdisciplinary examination of the scientific and biological explanations of poverty and social inequality in the United States, historically and in the present day.

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PS 111. Introduction to Political Science. 4 Credits.

Offers students the tools to think for themselves about politics: multiple ideological and analytical viewpoints on varying political arrangements around the world.

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PS 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Topics vary from year to year. Repeatable when topic changes.

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PS 201. United States Politics. 4 Credits.

Theoretical introduction to American institutions, political doctrines, and ideology as these affect the course of politics and public policy in the United States.

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PS 205. Introduction to International Relations. 4 Credits.

Introduction to theoretical and methodological tools for the analysis of world politics.

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PS 208. Introduction to the Tradition of Political Theory. 4 Credits.

Selected issues in political theory such as political obligation, rationality, diversity, and relativism. Covers contemporary and classical theories.

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PS 260. Public Policy and Democracy. 4 Credits.

Explores how American political ideals, interests, institutions, and history shape public policy, focusing on issues such as education, immigration, welfare, and civil liberties.

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PS 275. Legal Process. 4 Credits.

Overview of the United States legal system. Covers a range of sociolegal writing and provides a context for the legal system under which the U.S. operates.

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PS 297. Introduction to Environmental Politics. 4 Credits.

United States environmental policy and alternative environmental political futures.

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PS 302. States’ Rights (and Wrongs). 4 Credits.

Explores the division among U.S. federal, state and municipal power through the lens of our nation’s most contentious and most critical political and policy debates. Examines how elected officials, judges, and activists influence fights over federalism.

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PS 304. Democracy, Dictators, and Development. 4 Credits.

Examines key questions in political science like why some countries are rich while others are poor, why some countries are democratic and others are authoritarian, how these different political systems work, and which are best equipped to address ethno-nationalist conflict and economic development.

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PS 308. United States Political Thought. 4 Credits.

Development of United States political thought from the Revolution through the 20th century. Includes writings of Jefferson, Paine, Madison, Tocqueville.

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PS 309. Political Ideologies. 4 Credits.

Ideology is a more-or-less coherent lens through which a person views the world in order to process information and direct action. The course examines how the world looks different for those holding liberal, conservative, communist, fascist, or anarchist world views.

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PS 310. Roots of Democracy. 4 Credits.

Examines modern conceptions of democracy, citizenship, legality, virtue, equality, and political order, which grew out of ideas initially developed in ancient Greek city-states. Special attention given to ideas of active citizenship.

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PS 311. Sovereignty and Revolution. 4 Credits.

Examines contemporary conceptions of politics springing from European debates about the power of kings, law, and the people. Considers key textual moments in the process by which modern conceptions of democracy emerged.

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PS 312. Shadows of Modernity. 4 Credits.

Explores the distinct critiques of modernity offered by John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Michel Foucault, and Sigmund Freud. Concepts explored include liberalism, capitalism, power, morality, and the unconscious.

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PS 316. Black Lives Matter and American Democracy. 4 Credits.

Explores the ideological origins and contemporary politics of the Black Lives Matter movement. Modules include the demands of/on democracy, race and the criminal justice system, and the politics of protest.

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PS 320. International Organization. 4 Credits.

Studies efforts by states to cooperate in an effort to avoid or resolve conflict in the realms of security, trade, human rights, and the environment.

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PS 321. Introduction to Political Economy. 4 Credits.

Systematic comparison of markets and political processes and their outcomes.

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PS 324. European Politics. 4 Credits.

Overview of the formation and current dynamics of national politics in Western Europe.

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PS 326. United States Foreign Policy I. 4 Credits.

Basic concepts underlying the formulation and implementation of United States foreign policy; relationships between American society and foreign policy; the relationship of the U.S. to its international environment.

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PS 330. Governments and Politics in Latin America. 4 Credits.

Social, political, and economic developments in Latin America; causes and consequences of revolutions, democratization, economic politics; examples from Mexico, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Cuba, Guatemala, Venezuela. Offered alternate years.

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PS 337. The Politics of Development. 4 Credits.

Presents alternative perspectives on key north-south issues: trade, aid, foreign investment, debt, and the environment. Includes such institutions as the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and World Trade Organization.

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PS 340. International Political Economy. 4 Credits.

Links between economics and politics in the international system. Basic concepts include power, dependence, inequality, imperialism, and development. EC 201, 202, or PS 205 recommended preparation.

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PS 342. Politics of China. 4 Credits.

Survey of the politics of the People's Republic of China. Emphasis on political sociology and group conflict: elites, ideology, social change, and organization.

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PS 345. Southeast Asian Politics. 4 Credits.

Surveys major themes in contemporary Southeast Asian politics, including nation-state building, economic development, authoritarianism and democracy, and religious and ethnic politics.

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PS 346. Terrorism and Weapons Proliferation. 4 Credits.

Examines causes and control of terrorism, especially preventing terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction; theories and policies of nonproliferation and arms control.

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PS 347. Political Power, Influence, and Control. 4 Credits.

Survey of the use of the concept of power in the social sciences, stressing diverse theoretical perspectives and empirical studies of political institutions.

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PS 348. Women and Politics. 4 Credits.

Examines the political role of women and questions of equality in the U.S. from historical and contemporary perspectives. Topics may include voting, welfare, reproductive rights, and representation.

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PS 349. Mass Media and American Politics. 4 Credits.

The role of the mass media in contemporary American politics; the effect of the media on such institutions as political parties, elections, and the presidency.

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PS 350. Politics and Film. 4 Credits.

Examines the political relevance of films and their role as a medium for illustrating, defending, and challenging political ideas.

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PS 351. Democratic Dilemmas. 4 Credits.

Core course for the Wayne Morse Scholars Program, exploring significant political and policy challenges confronting our representative democracy.

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PS 352. Political Parties and Elections. 4 Credits.

Overview of current developments in political parties and interest groups in the United States.

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PS 355. Oregon Government and Politics. 4 Credits.

Current political issues in Oregon with particular attention to political races and ballot measures before the Oregon electorate as well as the state's major political institutions.

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PS 367. Science and Politics of Climate Change. 4 Credits.

Understanding the causes, impacts, policies, and politics of global climate change from natural and social science perspectives.

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PS 368. Gender in the Law. 4 Credits.

Examines the role courts have played in framing and shaping policies where gender is a central feature with a focus on reproductive rights, pregnancy and abortion, domestic violence, rape, family issues, prostitution, and sexual harassment. Offered alternate years.

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PS 369. Southern Politics. 4 Credits.

Explores the economic, social, and political aspects of life in the 20th-century US South.

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PS 371. United States Congress. 4 Credits.

Study of Congress as an institution: congressional elections, the committee system, and the internal distribution of influence; relations with the president and the Supreme Court.

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PS 374. Politics of the Middle East. 4 Credits.

Provides an overview of current political developments in the Middle East.

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PS 375. Race, Politics, and the Law. 4 Credits.

Examines the development and transformation of race-based domination and resistance in the United States by examining the intersection of policy and law.

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PS 378. Games in Politics. 4 Credits.

Politics viewed as strategic interactions among politicians, voters, and countries; focuses on how to model these interactions using tools of game theory.

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PS 380. Gender and Politics in Developing Countries. 4 Credits.

Examines gender politics in the developing world and efforts to help women. Topics include female genital cutting, violence against women, economic development, microfinance, migration, trafficking. Offered alternate years.

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PS 386. United States Social Movements and Political Change. 4 Credits.

Causes and consequences of American social movements. Considers theoretical perspectives. Topics may include agrarian populism, labor movement, civil rights movement, the women's movement, and identity politics.

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PS 390. American Indian Politics. 4 Credits.

Examination of the political and constitutional status of American Indian tribes in the United States, with some comparison to Canada. Focus on history, current policy, and potential futures.

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PS 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Topics vary from year to year. Repeatable when topic changes.

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PS 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-15 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable once for a maximum of four credits.

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PS 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-15 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 406. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable for maximum of 10 credits.

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PS 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Offerings vary from year to year, depending on student need and faculty interests. Repeatable when topic changes.

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PS 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable when title changes.

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PS 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Offerings vary from year to year, depending on student need and faculty interests. Repeatable when topic changes.

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PS 411. Honors Thesis Prospectus. 1 Credit.

Prepares students for writing the senior honors thesis in political science. Provides guidance in framing a suitable topic, conducting preliminary research, and writing a prospectus.
Prereq: majors with honors standing.

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PS 433. Marxism and Radical Thought. 4 Credits.

Surveys utopian socialist thought, anarchism, Marxism, and Leninism. Central themes include the nature of radical theory, the role of the state, human nature and the new society.

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PS 440. Causes and Prevention of War. 4 Credits.

Surveys theories of causes of war; focuses on major theories of prevention; case studies from World War I, World War II, and other wars.

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PS 445. Methods for Politics and Policy Analysis I. 4 Credits.

Introduction to quantitative analysis, concepts and methods of empirical research, applied statistical data analysis in political science. Methods include descriptive statistics, bivariate correlation, and regression techniques.

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PS 446. Methods for Politics and Policy Analysis II. 4 Credits.

Survey of multivariate model building for political analysis. Multiple regression, discrete-variable techniques, recursive systems, and cross-level analysis. Application of these techniques to concrete political problems.
Prereq: PS 445/545.

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PS 449. Racial Politics in the United States. 4 Credits.

Considers how race has interacted with political development in the U.S. from the New Deal to the present.

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PS 455. Theories of International Politics. 4 Credits.

Competing theories of international relations and strategies for testing the theories.

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PS 458. Feminist Political Theories. 4 Credits.

Examines the relationship between feminism, gender, and the state. Offered alternate years.

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PS 460. Political Economy of East Asia. 4 Credits.

Examines the political economy of East Asia, with a focus on states, markets, and social classes during economic transformation. Offered alternate years.

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PS 465. LGBT Rights in the Courts. 4 Credits.

Analyzes the role of legal advocates and the courts in advancing and curtailing lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights with a focus on relationship recognition, parenting, employment, housing, military, education, and health care. Offered alternate years.

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PS 466. Civil Rights in Post-Warren Era. 4 Credits.

Analyzes development in civil rights advocacy in the United States since the heyday of the Warren Court. Focuses primarily on developments in race, gender, disability, and sexuality. Offered alternate years.

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PS 467. The United States Presidency. 4 Credits.

An ambivalent view of the presidency as the key institution in the United States political system: source of great good but also of great harm.

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PS 470. Constitutional Law. 4 Credits.

Surveys how the U.S. Constitution works as a structure for government. Addresses how the federal courts interact within the U.S. system of government.

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PS 471. Intergenerational Justice. 4 Credits.

Examines the ethical and legal obligations that exist between earlier and later generations within a political society.

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PS 472. Matters of Life and Death. 4 Credits.

Examines the right to life from political, legal, and philosophical perspectives. Considers abortion, capital punishment, assisted suicide, just-war theory, and animal rights.

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PS 475. Politics of the European Union. 4 Credits.

Surveys the historical development and current workings of the European Union’s major institutions and policies. Offered alternate years.

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PS 477. International Environmental Politics. 4 Credits.

How nations solve international environmental problems. Explores major problems, processes, and current debates. Evaluates existing treaties through case studies.

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PS 479. U.S. Interventions in Developing Nations. 4 Credits.

Examines theories of intervention: security, economic imperialism, humanitarian intervention, spreading democracy, domestic politics; over thirty-seven U.S. interventions since 1898 are surveyed.

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PS 480. Introduction to Rational Choice. 4 Credits.

Introduces the paradigm of rational choice and game theory that is of special significance to politics.

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PS 484. United States Supreme Court. 4 Credits.

The Supreme Court as a political body; the judicial role in the context of the economic, political, social, and psychological factors that influence the court's decisions.

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PS 485. Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. 4 Credits.

Overview of the role of rights in the United States legal system. Particular emphasis on the role of freedom and equality in a federal system.

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PS 491. Politics of Everyday Life. 4 Credits.

Examines how we try to influence each other's behaviors in the course of everyday life. Readings from several disciplines.

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PS 495. United States Political Economy. 4 Credits.

Examines United States political-economic institutions from a comparative and historical perspective. Topics include rise and fall of mass production, labor and the law, and regional development.

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PS 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable. Offerings vary from year to year, depending on student needs and faculty interests.

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PS 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Offerings vary from year to year, depending on student needs and faculty interests. Repeatable when topic changes.

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PS 533. Marxism and Radical Thought. 4 Credits.

Surveys utopian socialist thought, anarchism, Marxism, and Leninism. Central themes include the nature of radical theory, the role of the state, human nature and the new society.

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PS 540. Causes and Prevention of War. 4 Credits.

Surveys theories of causes of war; focuses on major theories of prevention; case studies from World War I, World War II, and other wars.

Course usage information

PS 545. Methods for Politics and Policy Analysis I. 4 Credits.

Introduction to quantitative analysis, concepts and methods of empirical research, applied statistical data analysis in political science. Methods include descriptive statistics, bivariate correlation, and regression techniques.

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PS 546. Methods for Politics and Policy Analysis II. 4 Credits.

Survey of multivariate model building for political analysis. Multiple regression, discrete-variable techniques, recursive systems, and cross-level analysis. Application of these techniques to concrete political problems.

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PS 549. Racial Politics in the United States. 4 Credits.

Considers how race has interacted with political development in the U.S. from the New Deal to the present.

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PS 555. Theories of International Politics. 4 Credits.

Competing theories of international relations and strategies for testing the theories.

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PS 558. Feminist Political Theories. 4 Credits.

Examines the relationship between feminism, gender, and the state. Offered alternate years.

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PS 560. Political Economy of East Asia. 4 Credits.

Examines the political economy of East Asia, with a focus on states, markets, and social classes during economic transformation.

Course usage information

PS 565. LGBT Rights in the Courts. 4 Credits.

Analyzes the role of legal advocates and the courts in advancing and curtailing lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights with a focus on relationship recognition, parenting, employment, housing, military, education, and health care. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

PS 566. Civil Rights in Post-Warren Era. 4 Credits.

Analyzes development in civil rights advocacy in the United States since the heyday of the Warren Court. Focuses primarily on developments in race, gender, disability, and sexuality. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

PS 567. The United States Presidency. 4 Credits.

An ambivalent view of the presidency as the key institution in the United States political system: source of great good but also of great harm.

Course usage information

PS 570. Constitutional Law. 4 Credits.

Surveys how the U.S. Constitution works as a structure for government. Addresses how the federal courts interact within the U.S. system of government.

Course usage information

PS 571. Intergenerational Justice. 4 Credits.

Examines the ethical and legal obligations that exist between earlier and later generations within a political society.

Course usage information

PS 572. Matters of Life and Death. 4 Credits.

Examines the right to life from political, legal, and philosophical perspectives. Considers abortion, capital punishment, assisted suicide, just-war theory, and animal rights.

Course usage information

PS 575. Politics of the European Union. 4 Credits.

Surveys the historical development and current workings of the European Union’s major institutions and policies. Offered alternate years.

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PS 577. International Environmental Politics. 4 Credits.

How nations solve international environmental problems. Explores major problems, processes, and current debates. Evaluates existing treaties through case studies.

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PS 579. U.S. Interventions in Developing Nations. 4 Credits.

Examines theories of intervention: security, economic imperialism, humanitarian intervention, spreading democracy, domestic politics; over thirty-seven U.S. interventions since 1898 are surveyed.

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PS 584. United States Supreme Court. 4 Credits.

The Supreme Court as a political body; the judicial role in the context of the economic, political, social, and psychological factors that influence the court's decisions.

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PS 585. Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. 4 Credits.

Overview of the role of rights in the United States legal system. Particular emphasis on the role of freedom and equality in a federal system.

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PS 595. United States Political Economy. 4 Credits.

Examines United States political-economic institutions from a comparative and historical perspective. Topics include rise and fall of mass production, labor and the law, and regional development.

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PS 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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PS 612. Qualitative Methods. 5 Credits.

Survey of rationales for qualitative methods in the social sciences and the main conceptual and practical issues raised in qualitative research. Offered alternate years.

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PS 617. Political Behavior. 5 Credits.

Provides an overview of the important literature in the subfield of political behavior in U.S. politics.

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PS 618. American Political Institutions. 5 Credits.

One of three required seminars for PhD students planning to take a comprehensive examination in American politics. Explores how political science approaches the study of institutional contributions to political and policy developments.

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PS 619. United States Political Culture. 5 Credits.

In this course we examine the different ways that scholars study the relationship between politics and culture, and then focus on the United States as our case.

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PS 620. State of the Discipline. 5 Credits.

Introduction to trends in the political science profession and to the faculty at the University of Oregon.

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PS 622. Political Theory. 5 Credits.

Survey of major works in the field of classical and contemporary political theory.

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PS 624. International Relations. 5 Credits.

Survey of major works in the field of international relations.

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PS 625. Public Policy. 5 Credits.

Survey of major works in the field of public policy.

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PS 626. International Political Economy. 5 Credits.

One of two required seminars for PhD students planning to take a comprehensive examination in international relations. Explores how politics and economics interact in shaping economic relations among states.

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PS 627. Formal Theory and Methodology. 5 Credits.

Reviews basic formal theory as developed in political science since 1957.

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PS 628. States and State-Society Relations. 5 Credits.

Examines how scholars have studied the state and its relationship to society. Students develop a comparative perspective of contentious politics ranging from peasant rebellions to revolutions to transnational social movements.

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PS 629. Comparative Political Economy. 5 Credits.

Doctoral-level survey of how political factors explain variations in national or regional trajectories of economic development, including industrialization, wealth, growth, and inequality.

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PS 630. States and Regimes. 5 Credits.

Introduction to the major issues, theories, concepts, and arguments about states and regimes in comparative politics. Offered alternate years.