Romance Languages

http://rl.uoregon.edu

Amalia Gladhart, Department Head
541-346-4021
541-346-4030 fax
102 Friendly Hall
1233 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-1233

The Department of Romance Languages offers an extensive range of courses and degree programs, from instruction in beginning languages through the study of the literatures and cultures of French-, Italian-, Portuguese-, and Spanish-speaking countries. Students can earn a bachelor of arts (BA) degree in French, Italian, Spanish, or Romance languages; the master of arts (MA) is also available in these areas. The doctor of philosophy (PhD), awarded in Romance languages, encompasses a primary language and literature and a supporting area. Romance languages is a liberal-arts major, providing a valuable background for students interested in graduate work, teaching, and a wide array of other professional and international careers that require strong analytical and communication skills.

Preparation

The department recommends the following preparation for study leading to a major in any of the Romance languages:

  1. As much work as possible in the student’s major language. Knowledge of a second Romance language is helpful but not required
  2. Knowledge of the history, geography, and politics of the areas where the student’s major language is spoken
  3. Communication skills, speech, and essay writing that help the student convey ideas logically. In literature and film courses, papers or essay examinations are generally required
  4. Experience in literary and cultural studies and linguistics

Careers

Students who graduate with a bachelor of arts degree in Romance languages typically enter a variety of occupations. Language teaching is an obvious possibility. Proficiency in a second language and knowledge of other cultures enhances study and career opportunities in other areas as well. Romance languages majors, especially those who have a second major in another discipline (e.g., art history, business administration, economics, family and human services, history, international studies, journalism, music, or political science) find positions in communications media, government foreign service, international business and law, libraries, social service organizations, and travel and tourist-related agencies, among others.

Faculty

Faculty members in the Department of Romance Languages actively participate in other UO interdisciplinary programs and departments (e.g., African studies, cinema studies, comparative literature, European studies, Latin American studies, linguistics, medieval studies, and women’s and gender studies). For descriptions, see those sections of this catalog.

Scholarships

The department administers scholarships for undergraduate and graduate students of Romance languages:

  • The Leona M. Kail Scholarship supports studies in the Department of Romance Languages
  • The Perry J. Powers Scholarship is awarded annually to an outstanding Romance languages student
  • The Charles Stickles Endowment Scholarship is awarded for study in a Spanish-speaking country
  • The Emmanuel Hatzantonis Scholarship is awarded every year to a Romance languages major or minor who is studying in Italy with the university’s overseas study program
  • The Helen Fe Jones Spanish Student Fellowship supports study abroad in a Spanish-speaking country
  • The Françoise Calin scholarship is awarded every year to a French major or minor
  • The James T. and Mary Alice Wetzel Graduate Scholarship is awarded every year to an outstanding graduate student in the Department of Romance Languages
  • The Beall Graduate Dissertation Scholarship is awarded to doctoral students to support dissertation writing

More information may be obtained from the department office in early January or on the department website, rl.uoregon.edu/scholarships.

Faculty

Alexandre Albert-Galtier, associate professor (17th-century French theater, art, and literature). Licence, 1981, DEA, 1983, PhD, 1988, Lyon II. (1994)

Rafael Arias, instructor (Spanish); BA, 2009, MA, 2011, Oregon (2011)

Olga M. Avalos, senior instructor (Spanish). BA, 1974, JD, 1975, Lima. (2002)

Mayra Bottaro, assistant professor (18th- and 19th-century Spanish American literature and culture, transatlantic studies, print and material culture). Licenciatura, 2000, Salvador; PhD, 2013, California, Berkeley. (2012)

Cory Browning, assistant professor (19th- and 20th-century French and Francophone literature, critical theory, aesthetics and politics). BA, 2001, California, San Diego: MA, 2006, Paris Diderot, PhD, 2015, Cornell. (2014)

Nadia Ceccacci, senior instructor (Italian); supervisor-coordinator, first- and second-year Italian programs. Corso di laurea in Lingue e Letterature Straniere, 1981, Università degli Studi di Perugia; MA, 1986, Oregon. (1989)

Jeffrey Contreras, instructor (Spanish); BA, 2001, Oregon State, MA, 2009, Oregon. (2010)

Amy Costales, senior instructor (Spanish). BA, 1993, State University of New York, Cortland; MA, 2009, Oregon. (2007)

Lillian Darwin Lopez, senior instructor (Spanish). BA, 2001, MA, 2007, Oregon. (2007)

Simone Da Silva, instructor (Portuguese); supervisor-coordinator, Portuguese program. BA, 1997, Rio de Janeiro State; MA, 2002, Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. (2012)

Robert L. Davis, professor (methodology and pedagogy, Spanish and Romance linguistics). BA, 1983, Southern Mississippi; MA, 1987, PhD, 1991, North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (1991)

Laurie deGonzalez, senior instructor; supervisor and cocoordinator, first-year Spanish program. BA, 1979, Antioch; MA, 1987, Monterey Institute of International Studies. (1993)

Juanita Devereaux, senior instructor (Spanish). BA, 1999, MA, 2001, Oregon. (2001)

Connie Dickey, instructor (French); supervisor-coordinator, first-year French program. BA, 1979, Portland; MA, 1981, Seattle; PhD, 1991, California, Berkeley. (2014)

André Djiffack, associate professor (Francophone literatures, 20th-century French literature, colonial and postcolonial studies). BA, 1987, Maîtrise, 1988, Doctorat de 3e Cycle, 1992, Yaoundé; PhD, 1998, Cape Town. (2000)

Paula Ellister, senior instructor; supervisor and cocoordinator, first-year Spanish program. BA, 1992, MA, 1994, Oregon. (1994)

Cecilia Enjuto Rangel, associate professor (Spanish and Latin American poetry, transatlantic studies, gender and literary theory). BA, 1998, Universidad de Puerto Rico; MA, 2002, PhD, 2005, Yale. (2005)

Pedro García-Caro, associate professor (19th- and 20th-century literatures of the Americas, postcolonial studies, literary theory). Licenciatura, 1995, Murcia; BA, 1996, Roehampton; MA, 1997, PhD, 2004, University College, London. (2006)

Leonardo García-Pabón, professor (colonial Latin American literature, contemporary Latin American poetry, literary theory). BS, 1980, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés; MA, 1981, Université Catholique de Louvain; PhD, 1990, Minnesota, Twin Cities. (1990)

Amalia Gladhart, professor (20th-century Latin American literature, theater, feminist studies). BA, 1989, Michigan State; PhD, 1995, Cornell. (1995)

Paulo Henriquez, instructor (Spanish); licenciado en castellano, 2000, Universidad Austral de Chile; MA, 2005, PhD, 2012, Oregon. (2012)

Gina Herrmann, associate professor (contemporary Spanish literature, politics and culture, autobiographical studies, gender studies). BA, 1990, Cornell; MA, 1993, Columbia; PhD, 1998, Cornell. (2002)

Nathalie Hester, associate professor (French and Italian Renaissance and baroque literature and culture, travel literature). BA, 1992; MA 1993; PhD, 2001, Chicago. (2001)

Claudia Holguin, assistant professor (Spanish, sociolinguistics, language variation). BA, 1998, Texas, El Paso; MA, 2004, New Mexico State; PhD, 2011, Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. (2011)

Harinder Kaur Khalsa, senior instructor (Italian). BA, 1991, Istanbul; MA, 1996 and 1998, Oregon. (1999)

Mónica Lara, senior instructor (Spanish). BA, 1982, MA, 1992, Oregon. (1992)

Kelley León Howarth, senior instructor (Spanish); cohead, undergraduate advising. BA, 1995, Wisconsin, Eau Claire; MA, 2002, Oregon. (2002)

Massimo Lollini, Hatzantonis Professor (baroque and modern Italian literature, comparative modern literature). Laurea, 1978, Bologna; PhD, 1992, Yale. (1992)

Karen McPherson, professor (Francophone literatures, modern French novel, feminist theory). BA, 1970, Oregon; MA, 1983, PhD, 1987, Yale. (1998)

Leah Middlebrook, associate professor (early modern Spanish and French literature and culture, lyric poetry, comparative literature). See Comparative Literature.

Lanie Millar, assistant professor (20th- and 21st-century Caribbean and Latin American literature, Luso-African literature, global south studies). BA, 2002, Baylor; MA, 2003, Middlebury College; PhD, 2011, Texas, Austin. (2013)

Patrick Moneyang, visiting instructor (French); supervisor-coordinator, second-year French program. BA, 1999, MA, 2005, Yaoundé I; MA, 2007, PhD, 2013, Oregon. (2013)

Bryan J. Moore, senior instructor (Spanish). BA, 1987, MA, 1990, Oregon. (1990)

Fabienne Moore, associate professor (French Enlightenment, prose poetry, contemporary France). License, 1987, Toulouse–Le Mirail; PhD, 2001, New York University. (2000)

Rosario Murcia, senior instructor; supervisor-coordinator, second-year Spanish program. BA, 1984, Alicante; MA, 1988, Oregon. (1988)

Amanda W. Powell, senior lecturer; coordinator, third-year Spanish surveys. BA, 1977, Yale; MA, 1983, Boston University. (1991)

F. Regina Psaki, Giustina Family Professor in Italian Language and Literature (medieval and Renaissance Italian literature, comparative medieval literature). BA, 1980, Dickinson; MA, 1986, PhD, 1989, Cornell. (1989)

Heather Quarles, senior instructor (Spanish). BA, 2000, MA, 2003, Oregon. (2001)

Carrie Reilly, instructor (Spanish); BA, 1994, Saginaw Valley State; MA, 1998, Arkansas. (2009)

Sergio Rigoletto, associate professor (European cinema, popular culture, gender studies). Laurea, 2002, Catania; MA, 2004, Birkbeck, London; PhD, 2010, Reading. (2012)

Andrew Rothgery, senior instructor (Spanish). BA 1991, MA, 1994, Oregon. (1994)

Maria Benedita Santos, instructor (Portuguese). BA, 1974, Federal University of Maranhão; MA, 2007, Oregon. (2012)

Jésus Sepúlveda, senior instructor (Spanish). BA, 1995, Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educación; MA, 1997, PhD, 2003, Oregon. (2008)

Analisa Taylor, associate professor (Mexican literary and social history). BA, 1992, Oregon; MA, 1996, PhD, 2002, Duke. (2002)

Claudia Ventura, instructor (Italian). Laurea, 1995, Bologna; MA, 2006, Ca' Foscari, Venice. (2005)

David Wacks, professor (medieval Iberian literature and culture, Sephardic studies). BA, 1991, Columbia; MA, 1997, Boston College; PhD, 2003, California, Berkeley. (2003)

Nathan Whalen, senior instructor (Spanish). BA, 1999, MA, 2001, Oregon. (2001)

Melanie Williams, senior instructor (French); cohead, undergraduate advising. BA, 1992, MA, 1996, Oregon. (1996)

Gloria Zabala, senior instructor (Spanish). BA, 1983, MA, 1989, Oregon. (1989)

Alex Zunterstein, senior instructor (Spanish). BA, 2000, MA, 2002, Oregon. (2002)

Emeriti

Randi M. Brox, professor emerita. Cand. Philol., 1960, Oslo; PhD, 1965, Illinois. (1965)

Françoise G. Calin, professor emerita. Licence, 1963, Diplôme d’Études Supérieures, 1964, CAPES, 1966, Sorbonne; PhD, 1972, Stanford. (1973)

David J. Curland, senior instructor emeritus. BA, 1950, California, Los Angeles; MA, 1963, Oregon. (1966)

Richard H. Desroches, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1947, Clark; PhD, 1962, Yale. (1957)

Juan A. Epple, professor emeritus. Licenciate, 1971, Chile; MA, 1977, PhD, 1980, Harvard. (1980)

Sylvia Giustina, senior instructor emerita. BA, 1956, Marylhurst; MA, 1966, Oregon. (1968)

Evlyn Gould, professor emerita. BA, 1975, California, Irvine; MA, 1977, PhD, 1983, California, Berkeley. (1983)

Elisabeth A. Marlow, associate professor emerita. Diplôme, 1953, Hautes Études Commerciales, Paris; MA, 1958, PhD, 1966, Oregon. (1958)

Barbara D. May, associate professor emerita. BA, 1972, MA, 1973, PhD, 1975, Utah. (1976)

Steven Rendall, professor emeritus. BA, 1961, Colorado; PhD, 1967, Johns Hopkins. (1967)

Wolfgang F. Sohlich, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1959, Johns Hopkins; MA, 1970, PhD, 1971, Emory. (1970)

Luis Verano, senior instructor emeritus. BA, 1971, Portland State; MA, 1974, PhD, 1982, Oregon. (1983)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Programs leading to undergraduate degrees are offered in French, Italian, Spanish, and Romance languages (a major that combines advanced study in two languages). Students concentrate on the languages, literatures, and cultures of the Romance world, both modern and historical. They work on understanding, speaking, reading, and writing the modern language; they also focus on the historical roots of these languages and cultures, and on their writings—fiction, poetry, film, theater, criticism, and nonfiction.

To get exposure to the cultures of the countries where Romance languages are spoken, students are urged to study abroad. Visit the department website for more information.

Students who intend to pursue graduate work in Romance languages are advised to begin a second Romance language early in their studies. Courses in English and other literatures are also recommended. A goal of the department is to give students a thorough view of the cultures of the countries where Romance languages are spoken.

Major Requirements

Students are urged to consult their faculty advisors regularly to create balanced programs and avoid mistakes in course selection.

French, Italian, or Spanish

Courses for the major must be taught in the target language and address the target culture; readings in courses taken for the major must be in the target language. Internship credits, always taken pass/no pass, do not apply toward major or minor requirements. Courses must be passed with grades of C– or better beyond the second-year language sequence.

Bachelor of Arts: French

FR 301Culture et langage: la France contemporaine4
FR 302Culture et langage: Le monde francophone contemporain4
Select three of the following, or their equivalent: 12
French Survey: Francophone Literature 1
French Survey: Medieval and Renaissance
French Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment
French Survey: 19th and 20th Centuries
FR 416Advanced Writing in French4
or FR 425 French-English Translation
330-level or higher French literature, film, or translation courses 212
Upper-division French electives taught in French 312
Total Credits48
1

Students who have already taken Culture et langage: identités francophones (FR 303) cannot receive credit for French Survey: Francophone Literature (FR 312).

2

Taught in residence on the Eugene campus. At least 8 credits must be at the 400 level.

3

Must address the cultures of the French-speaking world (e.g., courses in literature, language, culture, film).

Bachelor of Arts: Italian

ITAL 301Cultura e lingua: l'Italia contemporanea4
ITAL 303Cultura e lingua: societa, economia, politica4
ITAL 307Oral Skills ((twice) or another 300-level language course)4
ITAL 317–319Italian Survey12
Italian literature courses beyond the surveys. 112
Upper-division Italian electives taught in Italian 212
Total Credits48
1

Taught in residence on the Eugene campus. At least 8 credits must be at the 400 level.

2

Courses must be upper-division, taught in Italian and address the cultures of the Italian-speaking world (e.g. courses in literature, language, culture, film, etc.)

Bachelor of Arts: Spanish with Literature and Culture Concentration

Lengua y cultura
Two from the following:8
Cultura y Lengua: Identidades Hispanas
Cultura y lengua: expresiones artisticas
Cultura y lengua: cambios sociales
Advanced Writing
SPAN 311Advanced Writing in Spanish 14
or SPAN 312 Spanish in the Media
Survey Courses
Three from the following:12
Hispanic Cultures through Literature I
Hispanic Cultures through Literature II
Hispanic Cultures through Literature III
Hispanic Cultures through Literature IV
Expertise and Mastery
Three courses in literature, film, or translation in Spanish: one from SPAN 348 or above; two from SPAN 407, SPAN 436, or above.12
Electives
Upper-division courses in literature, film, or linguistics, taught in Spanish, that address the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world12
Experiential Learning
Academic experience that involves using the Spanish language outside the classroom 2
Total Credits48
1

Students cannot receive credit for both SPAN 311 and SPAN 312.

2

Must involve at least 30 hours of work per term.

Bachelor of Arts: Spanish with Language and Society Concentration

Lengua y cultura
SPAN 308Cultura y lengua: comunidades bilingues4
One from the following:4
Cultura y Lengua: Identidades Hispanas
Cultura y lengua: expresiones artisticas
Cultura y lengua: cambios sociales
Advanced Writing
SPAN 311Advanced Writing in Spanish 14
or SPAN 312 Spanish in the Media
Survey Courses
SPAN 320Intensive Spanish Grammar Review4
SPAN 322Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics4
SPAN 324Spanish Pronunciation and Phonetics4
Expertise and Mastery
Three from the following:12
United States Latino Literature and Culture
Spanish Linguistics: [Topic]
History of the Spanish Language
Literary Translation
Spanish in the United States
Electives
Upper-division courses in literature, film, or linguistics, taught in Spanish, that address the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world12
Experiential Learning
Academic experience that involves using the Spanish language outside the classroom 2
Total Credits48
1

Students cannot receive credit for both SPAN 311 and SPAN 312.

2

Taught in residence on the Eugene campus. At least 8 credits must be at the 407 level or higher.

3

Must involve at least 30 hours of work per term.

Romance Languages

Romance languages majors must complete a minimum of 12 credits in literature, film, translation, and/or linguistics courses on the Eugene campus. At least 8 credits of these 12 must be in courses numbered 407 or higher.

Bachelor of Arts: Romance Languages

First Romance Language
Language courses12
Literature survey sequence for French, Italian, or Spanish: 112
Three of the following in French:
French Survey: Francophone Literature 2
French Survey: Medieval and Renaissance
French Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment
French Survey: 19th and 20th Centuries
Three of the following in Italian:
Italian Survey: Medieval and Renaissance
Italian Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment
Italian Survey: 19th and 20th Centuries
Spanish Literature and Culture Concentration (three of the following):
Hispanic Cultures through Literature I
Hispanic Cultures through Literature II
Hispanic Cultures through Literature III
Hispanic Cultures through Literature IV
Spanish Language and Society Concentration:
Intensive Spanish Grammar Review
Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics
Spanish Pronunciation and Phonetics
Additional literature, film, linguistics, or translation courses8
Second Romance Language
Language courses8
Courses in literature, film, linguistics, or translation8
Total Credits48
1

For the Spanish survey, choose only one of the two concentrations: Literature and Culture or Language and Society.

2

Students who have already taken Culture et langage: identités francophones (FR 303) cannot receive credit for French Survey: Francophone Literature (FR 312).

Departmental Honors

Approval for graduation with honors is granted to any student who meets one of the following requirements:

  1. Maintains at least a 4.00 grade point average (GPA) in all upper-division department course work and at least a 3.50 GPA overall, or
  2. Maintains at least a 3.75 GPA in all upper-division department course work and at least a 3.50 GPA overall, and submits an honors thesis written under the guidance of a Romance languages faculty thesis advisor. The thesis adviser determines whether the thesis is acceptable and may require the student to register for up to 6 pass/no pass (P/N) credits in Thesis (FR, ITAL, SPAN 403)

If a student wishes to apply for honors by submitting an honors thesis, the application for graduation with honors must be submitted by the end of the term that immediately precedes the term of graduation. If a student is planning on graduating in the spring term, they must apply for graduation through their departmental advisor during the winter term.

Transfer credits and overseas-study work used to fulfill major graduation requirements are typically included in determining the major GPA.

Minor Requirements

Students may earn a minor in French, Italian, or Spanish. Courses taken for the minor must be passed with grades of C– or better and must be in the target language and address the target culture. Further details are available on the department website.

Minor in French

Upper-division language courses12
Upper-division courses in literature, linguistics, translation, or film 112
Upper-division electives taught in French 24
Total Credits28
1

Must be taught on the Eugene campus.

2

Courses must be upper-division, taught in French and address the cultures of the French-speaking world (e.g. courses in literature, linguistics, language, culture, film, etc.)

Minor in Italian

Upper-division language courses12
Upper-division courses in literature, linguistics, translation, or film 112
Upper-division electives taught in Italian 24
Total Credits28
1

Must be taught on the Eugene campus.

2

Courses must be upper-division, taught in Italian and address the cultures of the Italian-speaking world (e.g. courses in literature, linguistics, language, culture, film, etc.)

Minor in Spanish

Upper-division language courses12
Upper-division courses in literature, linguistics, translation, or film 112
Upper-division electives taught in Spanish 24
Total Credits28
1

Must be taught on the Eugene campus.

2

Courses must be upper-division, taught in Spanish and address the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world (e.g. courses in literature, linguistics, language, culture, film, etc.)

Study Abroad

One of the best ways to learn a language and its culture is the experience of immersion in it. The Department of Romance Languages strongly encourages students to participate in one of the numerous study-abroad programs that the UO offers. Visit the department website for more information.

The department sponsors programs for the study of French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish languages and cultures. Students live, study, and travel in Europe, Africa, and the Americas, in countries such as Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, France, Italy, Mexico, Morocco, Peru, Senegal, and Spain. Cosponsoring programs include IE3 Global, the Council on International Educational Exchange, the School for International Training, and the National Student Exchange.

To ensure success in goals of language and cultural study, majors and minors in the department need to identify the program that best fits their academic requirements, financial situation, and personal interests. The list of programs posted on the department website is recommended based on their outstanding academic, linguistic, and cultural opportunities and strong on-site support.

Before traveling abroad, students should consult their assigned major or minor advisor about the selection of a program and the courses to be taken within that program.

Tips for Selecting a Study-Abroad Program

  • Choose a program that offers a maximum of immersion (e.g., living with host families or local students, course work entirely in the target language, direct university enrollment opportunities)
  • Longer programs offer you more opportunity to acclimate to the language, to be more fully immersed in the local culture, and to form meaningful relationships with people from the host country
  •  Courses in which the readings and lectures are in English do not count toward majors or minors in the Department of Romance Languages or the UO bachelor of arts second-language requirement
  • Students in all UO overseas study programs enroll in courses with subject codes that are unique to individual programs. Special course numbers are reserved for overseas study. Advisors can help students determine course equivalencies to maximize the credits applied to requirements for the degree
  • The department offers scholarships to help students with travel expenses for language learning and research projects. For more information, visit the scholarships page.

For additional information and to obtain applications for specific programs, contact the Office of International Affairs at (541) 346-3206. For questions on applying study-abroad credit to majors or minors, students should visit their assigned departmental advisor.

Cultural Ambassador Program in Spain

The Ministry of Education of Spain offers more than 1,200 openings for U.S. and Canadian language and culture assistants (termed “cultural ambassadors”). The positions are offered in Spain’s equivalent of the K–12 school system of public education.

Teaching Assistant Program in France

This program is coordinated by the French Embassy and offers 1,500 positions for native English speakers with a demonstrated knowledge of French to teach and its overseas department in France, to assist French teachers with English courses for a period of six to nine months, or both. The positions are offered in elementary and high schools (écoles primaire, collèges, and lycées). This is an excellent opportunity for graduating seniors with interest in education and experience abroad. It is open to United States citizens or permanent residents under 29 years of age with a demonstrated knowledge of French—not just majors or minors. The Department of Romance Languages does not administer the program, but simply offers guidance to interested students, and gives information and advice on the application process and on the program itself.

Kindergarten through Secondary School Teaching Careers

Students who complete a degree with a major in French, Spanish, or Romance languages are eligible to apply for the College of Education’s fifth-year licensure program in middle-secondary teaching. Students may also apply to the fifth-year licensure program to become an elementary teacher. More information is available from the department’s education advisor, Robert Davis; see also the College of Education section of this catalog.

The Department of Romance Languages offers programs of study leading to the degree of master of arts (MA) in Romance languages, French, Italian, or Spanish and to the degree of doctor of philosophy (PhD) in Romance languages.

The master’s degree program provides solid grounding and broad coverage in the literatures and cultures of each of the language areas. The PhD program allows students to focus on a specific literary and/or cultural field of interest.

Students follow these degree programs in an intellectually stimulating and supportive environment, characterized by close personal supervision, interdisciplinary approaches to literary and cultural studies, and professional training in both research methods and foreign-language pedagogy.

The university’s library resources for research in French, Italian, and Spanish support the department’s graduate programs; in some fields they are outstanding. The library’s holdings of learned periodicals are extensive.

Admission

An applicant for admission to the master of arts (MA) program should have completed an undergraduate major in a Romance language and literature or its equivalent (e.g., licence, laurea, licenciatura). Students with a degree in another discipline may apply, provided they have a good knowledge of at least one Romance language and are familiar with one Romance literature.

An applicant for admission to the PhD program should have completed a master of arts degree in a Romance language and literature or its equivalent. Students should have at least a reading knowledge of a second Romance language upon entering the PhD program.

Admission Procedure

Applications may be made online at rl.uoregon.edu/graduate/admissions. Applicants are required to

  • upload transcripts
  • submit a 750-word statement of purpose describing academic experience, the reasons for wanting to do graduate work in the Department of Romance Languages, and eventual career goals. Students applying to the PhD program are encouraged to specify research interests
  • submit three letters of recommendation from faculty members who can directly comment on the applicant’s language competence and aptitude for graduate studies in literature. One letter may refer to potential teaching ability

International students must demonstrate proficiency in English to the Graduate School and the Department of Romance Languages by one of the following three methods: 

  1. Submit an acceptable score from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) examination, currently offered in paper-based (written) or Internet-based formats. A minimum score of 575 on the paper-based test or 88 on the Internet-based test is required. More information on Graduate School admission requirements may be found at gradschool.uoregon.edu/academic-programs?page=gradProgramInfo
  2. Submit an acceptable score from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) examination. The minimum IELTS (academic module) overall band score for graduate admission is 7.0
  3. Submit degree transcripts proving that you have received a bachelor’s degree or higher from an accredited U.S. institution or from an institution in the following countries: Australia, Canada (excluding Quebec), Ireland, New Zealand, or the United Kingdom

If applying to the PhD program, submit a substantial writing sample (e.g., master’s thesis graduate seminar paper or master’s-level research paper on a relevant topic).

In addition to the application, send all official transcripts showing college-level work as of the date of application to the department’s graduate coordinator at the following address:

University of Oregon
Department of Romance Languages
1233 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-1233

Priority is given to applicants whose files are complete by January 6. The department’s graduate admissions committee reviews the completed file and notifies each applicant of its decision. New students are typically admitted to the program for fall term.

Graduate Teaching Fellowships

Graduate Teaching Fellowships are available each year for new graduate students in the department. Students should apply to the department by January 6 for fall admission and appointment priority. In exceptional cases, these fellowships may be supplemented by academic scholarships and awards.

Students who hold a graduate teaching fellow (GTF) appointment are required to register and complete a minimum of 9 graduate credits during each quarter of their appointment, all of which must apply toward their degree programs. GTF support to complete the master’s degree program is two years.

Master of Arts Program

Students entering the MA program may specialize in French, Italian, or Spanish, or combine two of these fields for a major in Romance languages. The master of arts program consists of course work, written examinations, and a research project. The program is designed to be completed in two years.

To help students navigate requirements, a faculty advisor is assigned by the department during fall term of the first year. Students may change advisors later if they wish.

Degree Requirements

All courses must be taken on a graded basis. Course work must be completed with grades of B– or better, and a grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 or better must be maintained.

A student whose knowledge of the language or languages is found to be deficient must take remedial work—an advanced writing class, additional study abroad, or some form of language immersion.

Master of Arts: French

RL 608Workshop: [Topic] 12-4
RL 620Graduate Study in Romance Languages 22-4
RL 623Romance Languages Colloquium: [Topic] 32-4
RL 607Seminar: [Topic] 32
Two graduate-level courses in medieval and Renaissance literature8
Two graduate-level courses in 17th–18th centuries literature8
Two graduate-level courses in literature from 1830 to 19458
Two graduate-level courses in literature from 1945 to the present8
French language courses12
Research project
Total Credits52-58
1

Taken fall term of first year.

2

Taken winter term of first year.

3

Taken in preparation for second-year fall forum.

Master of Arts: Italian

RL 608Workshop: [Topic] 12-4
RL 620Graduate Study in Romance Languages 22-4
RL 623Romance Languages Colloquium: [Topic] 32-4
RL 607Seminar: [Topic] 32
Two graduate-level courses in medieval literature8
Two graduate-level courses in Renaissance literature8
Two graduate-level courses in 17th–19th century literature8
Two graduate-level courses in literature from 20th century to the present8
Italian language courses12
Research project
Total Credits52-58
1

Taken fall term of first year.

2

Taken winter term of first year.

3

Taken in preparation for second-year fall forum.

Master of Arts: Spanish

RL 608Workshop: [Topic] 12-4
RL 620Graduate Study in Romance Languages 22-4
RL 623Romance Languages Colloquium: [Topic] 32-4
RL 607Seminar: [Topic] 32
Two graduate-level courses in literature from 11th century to 16058
Two graduate-level courses in literature from 1605 to 18108
Two graduate-level courses in literature from 1810 to 19398
Two graduate-level courses in literature from 1939 to the present8
Spanish language courses12
Research project
Total Credits52-58
1

Taken fall term of first year.

2

Taken winter term of first year.

3

Taken in preparation for second-year fall forum.

Master of Arts: Romance Language

RL 608Workshop: [Topic] 12-4
RL 620Graduate Study in Romance Languages 22-4
RL 623Romance Languages Colloquium: [Topic] 32-4
RL 607Seminar: [Topic] 32
Graduate-level course in each literary period in major language (see Literary Periods list)16
Graduate-level course in each of two periods in major language8
Graduate-level course in each literary period in minor language16
Research project
Total Credits48-54

Literary Periods

  • French
    • medieval and Renaissance
    • 17th–18th centuries
    • 1830–1945
    • 1945 to the present
  • Italian
    • medieval
    • Renaissance
    • 17th–19th centuries
    • 20th century to the present
  • Spanish
    • 11th century–1605
    • 1605–1810
    • 1810–1939
    • 1939 to the present

Master of Arts Research Project

The degree requires a research project (either a master's essay or a pedagogy portfolio) that allows a student to expand his or her expertise in literary and cultural studies or in teaching language, literature, and culture. A faculty member oversees the development of the final product and evaluates it. The student must identify a faculty member willing to serve as director and secure his or her signature of approval for the project by the ninth week of spring term of the first year.

The research project should be between 6,000 and 9,000 words. In consultation with the research project director, the student chooses whether to write the project in a Romance language or in English.

Research projects are approved by the director and are referred to the student’s MA examination committee (see below) for remediation if the work is found to be deficient or in need of revision. The director submits a final copy of the approved essay or portfolio to the department office by the last day of classes in spring term of the second year.

Essay in Literary and Cultural Studies

This essay allows students to widen their knowledge in one or more Romance languages, literatures, and cultures. In addition, the essay permits students to focus in greater depth on writing formal academic prose, presenting an interpretation, constructing an argument, documenting sources and references, and honing persuasive strategies. At the end of the first year of study, the student chooses one of the seminar papers that he or she submitted during the first three terms of course work. During the summer session immediately following, the student expands and polishes the paper.

Students who plan to apply for the PhD program in Romance languages at the University of Oregon must complete an essay in literary and cultural studies.

MA Pedagogy Portfolio in Teaching Language, Literature, and Culture

This project allows students to explore in depth specific issues of teaching a Romance language, its literature and cultures. The portfolio is designed in consultation with the director and serves to demonstrate the student’s professional expertise. The portfolio may include the following documents: a coherent collection of teaching materials supported by a theoretical rationale; a description, personal assessment, and third-party evaluation of an internship experience (e.g., a participatory learning experience at the UO); a formal "philosophy of teaching" statement; documentation of participation in a professional conference; and other components as recommended by the director.

Students who plan to apply for the doctoral program in Romance languages at the University of Oregon must complete a master of arts essay in literary and cultural studies.

Examinations

The master of arts examination comprises two four-hour exams taken in the seventh week of spring term in the second year.

For students studying for the MA in French, Italian, or Spanish, the first exam consists of one specific question in each of the four literary periods. The second exam consists of a detailed analysis of a short text in two parts: a close reading of the text and a consideration of the text in its social, historical, cultural, and/or literary contexts. The student, in consultation with the examination committee, chooses in which of the four periods this second exam is done.

The exams for the Romance languages MA are similar to those for French, Italian and Spanish. However, in the first exam students are asked to draw on examples from both their major and minor literatures in their answer to at least one of the questions. They are encouraged (but not required) to refer to both literatures in their answers to the other three short questions.

The graduate secretary informs the students and the examination committee members of the scheduled exam date.

Examination Committee

By the sixth week of fall term in the second year, students submit to their advisors and to the director of graduate studies an MA Examination Committee form with the names of faculty members suggested to cover other examination periods and signed by the committee chair.

By the end of the tenth week of fall term in the second year, students submit a preliminary examination reading list of literary works on which to be examined to the members of their exam committees and to the director of graduate studies.

Examination Reading List

Students construct a reading list, drawn up in consultation with the exam committee, using the departmental reading list and the syllabuses and bibliographies of the seminars they have taken, as well as the summer reading done in preparation for the fall forum.

For students studying for the MA in French, Italian, or Spanish, the reading list consists of at least ten items in each of the four periods, drawn up in consultation with the exam committee. Of the ten works in each period, at least five must be chosen from the departmental reading list. The other works can be suggested by the student, based on his or her own interests and readings.

For students studying for the MA in Romance languages, the reading list consists of at least twelve items in each of the four periods: eight in the major language and four in the minor. Of the eight works in the major language, at least four must be chosen from the departmental reading list; all texts in the minor language must be chosen from the departmental reading list.

The examination reading list also contains two additional secondary readings (usually literary histories or general literary surveys) that cover the four periods, also drawn from the departmental reading list.

The final version of the examination reading list must be approved and signed by the student’s exam committee and filed with the graduate secretary by the end of winter term of the second year. Students are responsible for distributing the approved reading list to the MA committee members as soon as the list is approved.

Examination Questions

In all fields, one of the two exams must be answered in the candidate’s major language; the other can be written in the major language or in English. Choice of language is to be determined in consultation with the committee chair.

The four members of the MA exam committee work together to prepare the questions for the candidate. The exam committee chair is responsible for collecting questions from the committee members and submitting them to the graduate secretary. On the first exam, the candidate answers four questions, choosing between two questions in each of four periods. On the second exam, the candidate chooses between two possible selections for the close reading analysis. The four members read and grade both exams and come to an agreement on the final grade to be submitted for each exam. The committee chair moderates this discussion, submits the grades to the graduate secretary, and communicates the results to the candidate. The student passes when the average grade for each exam is satisfactory (low pass, pass or high pass).

The master’s examination is a closed book exam and therefore without footnotes or a bibliography. The exam must be typed using a twelve-point font, double-spaced.

Students who fail the master of arts examination in whole or in part will be allowed to take it over (in whole or in part) once. They are encouraged to do so during the course of the following term (usually the summer session) and no later than six months after failing. If they fail again, they are disqualified.

Research: [Topic] (FR 601), Research: [Topic] (ITAL 601), or Research: [Topic] (SPAN 601)  and Practicum: [Topic] (FR 609), Practicum: [Topic] (ITAL 609), or Practicum: [Topic] (SPAN 609). Students who hold a GTF appointment may register for 2 credits of Practicum or one credit of Research in order to complete the nine credits per term required by the Graduate School (two graduate courses constitute 8 credits). During the first quarter of their first year, students holding a GTF appointment use Practicum to develop their teaching skills in practical application. Students not holding a GTF appointment are encouraged to take a third course (for a total of 12 credits) or 1 credit of Research to work on an independent research project.

Reading and Conference: [Topic] (FR 605), Reading and Conference: [Topic] (ITAL 605), or Reading and Conference: [Topic] (SPAN 605). Students may request to do a Reading and Conference course to address a specific problem on which no course currently exists. Before the end of the term preceding the Reading and Conference course, the student prepares a project proposal and submits it to the faculty member with whom he or she wants to work. The project proposal should include a statement of the problem the student wants to explore and a tentative reading list of primary and secondary sources. Only one 4-credit Reading and Conference course may be used to satisfy requirements for the MA degree.

Reading and Conference: [Topic] (RL 605). The purpose of this required independent reading course is to motivate students to begin reading during the summer following their first year in the MA program in preparation for the exams that will take place in the spring term of their second year.

During the spring term of the first year of the MA program, students present to their advisors a reading list of eight to ten works to be studied during the summer. The books must belong to no more than two of the periods defined by the MA program, and five of the books must be taken from the departmental reading list. At least one of the texts should be a literary history or a similar text about the period. This approved list (signed by the faculty advisor) will be submitted to the director of graduate studies before the end of the spring term.

In fall term, students will register for a 2-credit, graded Reading and Conference course with the director of graduate studies as the instructor of record.

In the third week of the fall term of the second year, students present the findings of their summer study in a public forum. This one-day forum is organized as a professional meeting, with a chair for each session, a discussion following the presentations, and refreshments. Most Romance language faculty members are present during these presentations, as well as all MA students.

Presentations are fifteen minutes long and delivered in English. Presentations focus on the main themes that students have explored in their readings. Students should be able to discuss both literary techniques and historical context of the period selected, providing examples from the books they have read. Plot summaries should be avoided.

At the end of the presentations, the faculty members meet to evaluate the presentations. On satisfactory completion of this exercise, students receive 2 graded credits for the course. If the faculty members find that a presentation was deficient, they recommend that the student do supervised reading with the faculty specialist in the period before being assigned a grade and receiving course credit.

Incompletes

Incompletes are strongly discouraged. However, students who find it necessary to ask for an incomplete are urged to complete their incompletes as rapidly as possible. Agreements for obtaining and completing incompletes must be filed with the department. Graduate students must convert a graduate course incomplete into a passing grade within one calendar year of the assignment of the incomplete. Any student who has more than 5 credits of incompletes is making unsatisfactory progress toward the degree.

Doctor of Philosophy

The PhD program in Romance languages is designed to provide

  • a thorough familiarity with several fields (e.g., a movement, a genre, a period, or a literary problem)
  • the opportunity to situate the student’s special interests in the wider context of Romance languages and literatures as well as in the context of trends inside and outside Western European culture
  • the tools necessary to engage literary issues at a high level
  • the ability to examine new and challenging literary or theoretical perspectives

Students who enter the PhD program with no knowledge of a second Romance language are required to start learning one as soon as possible during their graduate studies.

The PhD program has five components: course work, comprehensive examination, dissertation prospectus, original dissertation, and final oral defense.

Course Work

The PhD degree requires a total of 84 graduate-level credits—32 credits in addition to the 52 required for the master’s degree. Course work applied to the degree must be taken for letter grades, and a grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 or better must be maintained.

Students must complete at least 21 graduate seminars in the department (at least 84 credits in all) beyond the bachelor’s degree. PhD students must thus take at least 8 graduate courses (32 credits) beyond the 13 courses (52 credits) required for the master’s. Only one of these 8 courses (4 credits) may be satisfied in the form of a Reading and Conference course (Reading and Conference: [Topic] (FR 605), Reading and Conference: [Topic] (ITAL 605), or Reading and Conference: [Topic] (SPAN 605)).

Of the twenty-one courses (84 credits), three (12 credits) must be taken in a second Romance language.

As many as three of the twenty-one courses (12 of the 84 credits) may be taken outside the department, with the authorization of the advisor, and provided that the courses bear directly on the student’s program of study.

Doctoral students are also strongly encouraged to take Romance Languages Colloquium: [Topic] (RL 623) for at least two credits. Colloquium may either be taken as a 2-credit pass/no pass course (in which case it does not count toward the 52 credits required for the degree) or as a 4-credit graded course.

Students with an MA in French, Italian, Spanish, or Romance languages from the University of Oregon may count a maximum of two graduate courses completed during the MA program toward PhD course requirements, provided that these courses were not used to fulfill MA requirements.

Graduate students with an MA in French, Italian, Spanish, or Romance languages from another institution must take a minimum of 40 credits in the Department of Romance Languages. The department’s graduate committee evaluates previous graduate course work and determines whether additional work is necessary to fill any gaps in a student’s preparation. This may result in a student having to take more than 40 credits at the University of Oregon—up to a maximum of 68 credits. If the candidate is found to be seriously deficient or if the master’s degree is in a field other than Romance languages, the graduate committee may admit the student into the master’s program. In this case, the student may submit a petition to the committee to transfer a maximum of three courses toward the twelve courses required for the MA This petition may be submitted after the student has completed four graduate-level courses with grades of mid-B or better in the Romance languages master’s program.

Comprehensive Examination

Students entering the PhD program should develop, as soon as possible but no later than the third term of course work beyond the master’s degree, a field of interest that forms the basis of their research for the PhD comprehensive examination and ideally for the dissertation. This field of interest usually emerges from the selected courses and shapes the areas of concentration represented on the comprehensive examination.

The comprehensive examination consists of two written examinations and an oral examination. Each written examination covers a subfield that pertains to the student’s field of interest. The subfields should be defined and prepared with three members of the Romance languages faculty who constitute the PhD examination committee. One of these faculty members should represent the student’s second Romance language. A fourth member may be added from another department. In consultation with the members of the examination committee, the student creates a reading list for each of the subfields. The reading list must be approved by the examination committee no later than four weeks before the date of the exam. Student are responsible for distributing the reading list to the committee members of the examination committee as soon as the list is approved.

The written examinations take the form of two essays that respond to questions formulated by members of the PhD examination committee. Each written examination covers one of the subfields and is a maximum of twenty double-spaced, typed pages in length. The student has two weeks to write each of the two essays.

Two weeks after the successful completion of the written essays, the student takes an oral examination. The oral examination attempts to integrate the subfields addressed in the written examinations with the other facets of the student’s declared field of interest. In a two-hour conversation, the candidate and the committee members examine and elaborate on ways in which the written essays help to define a project within the student’s field of interest.

Typically undertaken during the fifth term of study following the master’s degree, the comprehensive examination should result in clarification of the dissertation’s subject matter and possible approaches to it. The exam should, in other words, yield at least a tentative dissertation topic.

A student who fails the PhD examination in whole or in part will be allowed to take it over (in whole or in part) once. The student is encouraged to do so no later than six months after failing. A second failure results in disqualification.

It is the student’s responsibility to schedule both the written and oral portions of the comprehensive examination.

With the successful completion of the PhD comprehensive exam, the student will advance to candidacy and begin preparing the dissertation prospectus.

Dissertation Prospectus

The prospectus, typically completed during the sixth term of study following the master’s degree, defines the scope of the dissertation and demonstrates the originality of the project. It consists of an eight- to ten-page description of the proposed dissertation project and a substantial research bibliography of primary and secondary material.

Students are responsible for putting together a dissertation committee, which typically consists of four members: one director and two readers from the Department of Romance Languages, and one reader from another department. A student may also choose to have two codirectors in the Department of Romance Languages (plus two further members of the department).

When the student has a solid draft of the prospectus, she or he schedules a meeting with the dissertation committee members for a presentation and discussion of the prospectus. Following this conversation, the student will make final revisions to the prospectus. Once the committee has given its final approval, the student submits the prospectus to the department for filing.

Students are reminded that they must have a dissertation committee in place and proper documents filed with the Graduate School six months before the dissertation defense.

Any student making significant changes to the dissertation project after the final approval of the prospectus must schedule a meeting with the dissertation committee before proceeding.

Dissertation

The dissertation constitutes an original and valuable contribution to scholarship in the student’s field of interest. It should be characterized by mature literary interpretation, informed and reasoned argument, and an awareness of the means and goals of research.

It is the student’s responsibility to ascertain the rules and deadlines of the Graduate School for proper filing of the dissertation. Students are strongly encouraged to familiarize themselves with the stringent formatting and structure guidelines for the dissertation provided by the Graduate School (available online).

A final copy of the dissertation must be distributed to the dissertation committee for final approval at least three weeks before the dissertation defense.

Final Oral Defense

When all members of the dissertation committee have approved the dissertation, a final public oral presentation and defense of the work is held.

Funding

All post-MA work, including the dissertation, is typically completed in four to five years of study. PhD students making satisfactory progress toward the degree are eligible for funding packages in the form of Graduate Teaching Fellowships. These fellowships include stipends for teaching, as well as tuition waivers. Satisfactory progress entails completing all courses taken for credit with a grade of mid-B or better; passing the PhD comprehensive examination; timely submission of an acceptable dissertation prospectus; and regular and timely progress on the dissertation itself. 

Courses

Course usage information

FR 101. First-Year French. 5 Credits.

Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French.

Course usage information

FR 102. First-Year French. 5 Credits.

Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French.
Prereq: FR 101.

Course usage information

FR 103. First-Year French. 5 Credits.

Introduction to French stressing the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through a communicative approach. Sequence. Conducted in French.
Prereq: FR 102.

Course usage information

FR 111. Intensive Beginning French. 5 Credits.

Intensive study for experienced language learners; introduction to French culture. Sequence. Cannot be combined with FR 101, 102, 103 for more than 15 credits of first-year French.
Prereq: previous study of French or competence in another Romance language.

Course usage information

FR 112. Intensive Beginning French. 5 Credits.

Intensive study for experienced language learners; introduction to French culture. Cannot be combined with FR 101, 102, 103 for more than 15 credits of first-year French.
Prereq: FR 111.

Course usage information

FR 150. Cultural Legacies of France. 4 Credits.

French civilization in France and beyond. Possible topics are the Francophone world; premodern, early modern, and modern France; French film, architecture, and painting. Conducted in English.

Course usage information

FR 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FR 201. Second-Year French. 4 Credits.

Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Sequence.
Prereq: first-year language competence.

Course usage information

FR 202. Second-Year French. 4 Credits.

Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Sequence.
Prereq: FR 201.

Course usage information

FR 203. Second-Year French. 4 Credits.

Development of reading, writing, and speaking skills; study of short literary and cultural texts; considerable attention paid to oral use of the language. Sequence.
Prereq: FR 202.

Course usage information

FR 301. Culture et langage: la France contemporaine. 4 Credits.

Training in language and culture of modern France using newspapers, short stories, poetry and film. Vocabulary enrichment activities. Conducted in French.
Prereq: FR 203.

Course usage information

FR 302. Culture et langage: Le monde francophone contemporain. 4 Credits.

Training in language and cultures of the French-speaking world using literary texts, websites, videos. Grammar review and vocabulary enrichment.
Prereq: FR 203.

Course usage information

FR 307. Oral Skills. 2 Credits.

Repeatable. Practice in improving oral, comprehension, and listening skills in French. Communicative activities in class in addition to language laboratory work. Repeatable once for maximum of 4 credits.
Prereq: FR 203 or equivalent.

Course usage information

FR 312. French Survey: Francophone Literature. 4 Credits.

Introduction to major authors and texts of the French-speaking world outside of France.
Prereq: FR 301 or FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 317. French Survey: Medieval and Renaissance. 4 Credits.

Introduction to major themes and ideas in French literature from the medieval and Renaissance periods through the reading of representative texts.
Prereq: FR 301 or FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 318. French Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment. 4 Credits.

Introduction to major themes and ideas in French literature from the 17th and 18th centuries through the reading of representative texts.
Prereq: FR 301 or FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 319. French Survey: 19th and 20th Centuries. 4 Credits.

Representative literary works from the 19th and 20th centuries with attention to literary analysis and literary history.
Prereq: FR 301 or FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 320. Intensive French Grammar Review. 4 Credits.

Promotes linguistic competency in French through intensive review and refinement of French grammar while introducing basic vocabulary and linguistic concepts.
Prereq: FR 203.

Course usage information

FR 330. French Poetry. 4 Credits.

Poems from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, literary movements, introduction to textual analysis and modern critical approaches.
Prereq: FR 301, FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 331. French Theater. 4 Credits.

Explores important aspects of French theater. Reading plays from different periods. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading.
Prereq: FR 301, FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 333. French Narrative. 4 Credits.

Covers important aspects of French narrative. Reading texts from different periods. Emphasis on formal aspects and critical reading.
Prereq: FR 301, FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 342. French Literature in Translation: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

In-depth examination of French aesthetic and intellectual movements through the reading in translation and discussion of theoretical texts and creative fiction. Conducted in English. No major or minor credit. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

FR 361. French Cinema for Nonmajors. 4 Credits.

An introduction to the major movements of French cinema for nonmajors. No prior knowledge of film studies or French culture required. Taught in English.

Course usage information

FR 362. French Film. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the differences between American culture and French and Francophone cultures. Addresses a sensitive issue exemplified by the attitude of the international movie industry.
Prereq: FR 301, FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 372. French-Speaking Communities of the Americas. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the history, language, and culture of French-speaking communities located in the Americas, in particular the United States. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: FR 301, FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.
Prereq: FR 301, FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 403. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FR 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FR 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include French Novel and World War II, Writers and Painters, Medievalism, Francophone Caribbean, Gide and Sartre.
Prereq: two survey courses from FR 312, FR 317, FR 318, or FR 319.

Course usage information

FR 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FR 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FR 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FR 416. Advanced Writing in French. 4 Credits.

Extended written production; writing for specific purposes and audiences. Advanced grammar review and composition; study of specialized vocabulary.
Prereq: FR 301, FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 425. French-English Translation. 4 Credits.

Offers an overview of translation theory and practice from English to French and French to English.
Prereq: FR 301, FR 302.

Course usage information

FR 450. 17th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 17th-century French literature. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: FR 317, 318, 319.

Course usage information

FR 451. Baroque Theater: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Intensive study of representative plays by Moliere, Racine, or Corneille with emphasis on modern criticism. Repeatable when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.
Prereq: three survey courses from FR 312, FR 317, FR 318, or FR 319.

Course usage information

FR 460. 18th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 18th-century French literature. A recent topic is Being Modern in the 18th century. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: three survey courses from FR 312, FR 317, FR 318, or FR 319.

Course usage information

FR 480. 19th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 19th-century French literature. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: three survey courses from FR 312, FR 317, FR 318, or FR 319.

Course usage information

FR 490. 20th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 20th-century French literature. Recent topics include African Identities, The French Novel in 2000, Postcolonial Africa. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: FR 317, 318, and 319.

Course usage information

FR 492. Francophone Studies: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Study of literary works representative of the Francophone world. Topics may include Francophone African Literature, Quebec Literature, Writing the Haitian Revolution. Repeatable five times for a maximum of 24 credits.
Prereq: three from FR 312, FR 317, FR 318, FR 319.

Course usage information

FR 497. Francophone Women's Writing. 4 Credits.

Developments in literature by women from areas such as Maghreb, the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, Quebec, the Indian Ocean, and Europe.
Prereq: FR 317, 318, and 319.

Course usage information

FR 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include French Novel and World War II, Writers and Painters, Medievalism, Francophone Caribbean, Gide and Sartre.

Course usage information

FR 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FR 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FR 516. Advanced Writing in French. 4 Credits.

Extended written production; writing for specific purposes and audiences. Advanced grammar review and composition; study of specialized vocabulary.

Course usage information

FR 550. 17th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 17th-century French literature. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

FR 551. Baroque Theater: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Intensive study of representative plays by Moliere, Racine, or Corneille with emphasis on modern criticism. Repeatable when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

Course usage information

FR 560. 18th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 18th-century French literature. A recent topic is Being Modern in the 18th century. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

FR 580. 19th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 19th-century French literature. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

FR 590. 20th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Changing topics concerning trends or particular authors representative of 20th-century French literature. Recent topics include African Identities, The French Novel in 2000, Postcolonial Africa. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

FR 592. Francophone Studies: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Study of literary works representative of the Francophone world. Topics may include Francophone African Literature, Quebec Literature, Writing the Haitian Revolution. Repeatable five times for a maximum of 24 credits.

Course usage information

FR 597. Francophone Women's Writing. 4 Credits.

Developments in literature by women from areas such as Maghreb, the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, Quebec, the Indian Ocean, and Europe.

Course usage information

FR 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FR 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FR 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

FR 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

ITAL 101. First-Year Italian. 5 Credits.

Introduction to Italian stressing speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension skills. Sequence.

Course usage information

ITAL 102. First-Year Italian. 5 Credits.

Introduction to Italian stressing speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension skills. Sequence.
Prereq: ITAL 101.

Course usage information

ITAL 103. First-Year Italian. 5 Credits.

Introduction to Italian stressing speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension skills. Sequence.
Prereq: ITAL 102.

Course usage information

ITAL 104. Intensive First-Year Italian. 5 Credits.

Covers in two terms the work of ITAL 101, 102, 103. Sequence. Cannot be taken in any combination with ITAL 101, 102, 103 to total more than 15 credits of first-year Italian.

Course usage information

ITAL 105. Intensive First-Year Italian. 5 Credits.

Covers in two terms the work of ITAL 101, 102, 103. Sequence. Cannot be taken in any combination with ITAL 101, 102, 103 to total more than 15 credits of first-year Italian.
Prereq: ITAL 104.

Course usage information

ITAL 150. Cultural Legacies of Italy. 4 Credits.

Italy's contributions to world cultures includes topics such as modern Italian life, Italians in America, Italian cinema and its influence, the Italian Renaissance, Roman art, opera. Conducted in English.

Course usage information

ITAL 152. Desire and Resistance: Italian Cinema. 4 Credits.

The theories and works of the major Italian filmmakers; topics in Italian history and culture; introduction to film analysis.

Course usage information

ITAL 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ITAL 201. Second-Year Italian. 4 Credits.

Review of grammar, reading of short literary and cultural texts, development of speaking and writing skills. Sequence. Conducted in Italian.
Prereq: first year language competence.

Course usage information

ITAL 202. Second-Year Italian. 4 Credits.

Review of grammar, reading of short literary and cultural texts, development of speaking and writing skills. Sequence. Conducted in Italian.
Prereq: ITAL 201.

Course usage information

ITAL 203. Second-Year Italian. 4 Credits.

Review of grammar, reading of short literary and cultural texts, development of speaking and writing skills. Sequence. Conducted in Italian.
Prereq: ITAL 202.

Course usage information

ITAL 252. The Italian-American Experience. 4 Credits.

Overview of the Italian-American experience investigating the process of assimilation of Italians into American life through the analysis of different cultural artifacts.

Course usage information

ITAL 301. Cultura e lingua: l'Italia contemporanea. 4 Credits.

Analysis of Italian history and society since the unification of Italy through the readings of a short novel. Vocabulary enrichment activities and grammar review.
Prereq: ITAL 203.

Course usage information

ITAL 303. Cultura e lingua: societa, economia, politica. 4 Credits.

Analysis of Italian society, its economy and politics from 1950 to present. Readings of short stories and magazine articles, viewing of films. Vocabulary enrichment activities and grammar review.
Prereq: ITAL 203.

Course usage information

ITAL 305. Cultura e lingua: arte, musica, i mass media. 4 Credits.

Artistic expressions over time and the influence of the mass media on the social structures and language.
Prereq: ITAL 203.

Course usage information

ITAL 307. Oral Skills. 2 Credits.

Practice in improving listening, comprehension, and oral skills in Italian. Communicative activities in class in addition to language laboratory work. Repeatable twice for maximum of 6 credits.
Prereq: ITAL 203 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ITAL 317. Italian Survey: Medieval and Renaissance. 4 Credits.

Introduction to major themes and ideas in Italian literature and art from the medieval and Renaissance periods. Conducted in Italian.
Prereq: ITAL 203.

Course usage information

ITAL 318. Italian Survey: Baroque and Enlightenment. 4 Credits.

Introduction to major themes and ideas in Italian literature from the baroque and Enlightenment periods through the reading of representative texts. Conducted in Italian.
Prereq: ITAL 203.

Course usage information

ITAL 319. Italian Survey: 19th and 20th Centuries. 4 Credits.

Representative literary works from the 19th and 20th centuries with attention to literary analysis and literary history. Conducted in Italian.
Prereq: ITAL 203.

Course usage information

ITAL 320. Intensive Italian Grammar Review. 4 Credits.

Bridges second- and third-year culture and literature courses. Provides review, synthesis, consolidation, and elaboration of linguistic knowledge gained from lower-division courses.
Prereq: ITAL 203.

Course usage information

ITAL 341. Dante in Translation. 4 Credits.

The entire "Divine Comedy" read in English. Focuses on specific medieval components, relevance for modern readers, effects and process of translation. Conducted in English. No major or minor credit.

Course usage information

ITAL 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

ITAL 403. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ITAL 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ITAL 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 6 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Il canzoniere, Italian Folktales, Italian Epic, Pirandello, Literary Analysis.
Prereq: one from ITAL 317, ITAL 318, ITAL 319.

Course usage information

ITAL 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. Special group activities such as production of Italian plays.

Course usage information

ITAL 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ITAL 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ITAL 441. Medieval Italian Culture: [Topic]. 4-6 Credits.

Cultural productions of 13th- and 14th-century Italy (e.g., translating Dante, rewriting Boccaccio, chivalric romance) and the history of their interpretation. Conducted in Italian. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: ITAL 317 or ITAL 318 or ITAL 319.

Course usage information

ITAL 444. Medieval and Renaissance Literature: [Topic]. 4-6 Credits.

Focuses on a topic from 13th- to 16th-century Italy (e.g., medieval foundations of the Renaissance, Petrarch and Petrarchism, representations of otherness, Boccaccio and his influence). Conducted in Italian. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: ITAL 317 or ITAL 318 or ITAL 319.

Course usage information

ITAL 449. Humanism and the Renaissance. 4 Credits.

Covers authors who exemplify learning, aesthetics, and ideology of Renaissance Italy (e.g., Ariosto, Castiglione, Colonna, Franco, Leonardo, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Tasso). Includes essays in criticism and theory. Conducted in Italian.
Prereq: ITAL 317 or ITAL 318 or ITAL 319.

Course usage information

ITAL 461. Vico and the Settecento. 4 Credits.

Focuses on Giambattista Vico's "New Science" and "Autobiography" in the context of the philosophical and aesthetic debates of the 18th century.
Prereq: ITAL 317 or ITAL 318 or ITAL 319.

Course usage information

ITAL 481. 19th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics concerning issues or authors in 19th-century Italian literature (e.g., Irony and Novel, Leopardi and Italian Romanticism). Conducted in Italian. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: ITAL 317 or ITAL 318 or ITAL 319.

Course usage information

ITAL 491. 20th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics about issues or figures in 20th-century Italian literature (e.g., Modern Lyric Poetry, Postmodern Narrative). Conducted in Italian. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: ITAL 317 or ITAL 318 or ITAL 319.

Course usage information

ITAL 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 6 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Il canzoniere, Italian Folktales, Italian Epic, Pirandello, Literary Analysis.

Course usage information

ITAL 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Special group activities such as production of Italian plays.
Prereq: ITAL 203 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ITAL 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ITAL 541. Medieval Italian Culture: [Topic]. 4-6 Credits.

Cultural productions of 13th- and 14th-century Italy (e.g., translating Dante, rewriting Boccaccio, chivalric romance) and the history of their interpretation. Conducted in Italian. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

ITAL 544. Medieval and Renaissance Literature: [Topic]. 4-6 Credits.

Focuses on a topic from 13th- to 16th-century Italy (e.g., medieval foundations of the Renaissance, Petrarch and Petrarchism, representations of otherness, Boccaccio and his influence). Conducted in Italian. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

ITAL 549. Humanism and the Renaissance. 4 Credits.

Covers authors who exemplify learning, aesthetics, and ideology of Renaissance Italy (e.g., Ariosto, Castiglione, Colonna, Franco, Leonardo, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Tasso). Includes essays in criticism and theory. Conducted in Italian.
Prereq: work in literature.

Course usage information

ITAL 561. Vico and the Settecento. 4 Credits.

Focuses on Giambattista Vico's "New Science" and "Autobiography" in the context of the philosophical and aesthetic debates of the 18th century.
Prereq: reading knowledge of Italian.

Course usage information

ITAL 581. 19th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics concerning issues or authors in 19th-century Italian literature (e.g., Irony and Novel, Leopardi and Italian Romanticism). Conducted in Italian. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: previous work in literature.

Course usage information

ITAL 591. 20th-Century Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics about issues or figures in 20th-century Italian literature (e.g., Modern Lyric Poetry, Postmodern Narrative). Conducted in Italian. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: previous work in literature.

Course usage information

ITAL 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ITAL 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ITAL 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

ITAL 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

PORT 101. First-Year Portuguese. 5 Credits.

Introduction to Brazilian Portuguese language and culture, with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension skills. Sequence with PORT 102, 103.

Course usage information

PORT 102. First-Year Portuguese. 5 Credits.

Introduction to Brazilian Portuguese language and culture, with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension skills. Sequence with PORT 101, 103.
Prereq: PORT 101 or equivalent.

Course usage information

PORT 103. First Year Portuguese. 5 Credits.

Introduction to Brazilian Portuguese language and culture, with emphasis on speaking, reading, writing and listening comprehension skills. Sequence with PORT 101, 102.
Prereq: PORT 102 or equivalent.

Course usage information

PORT 111. Intensive Beginning Portuguese. 5 Credits.

PORT 111 is the first part of a two-quarter sequence (PORT 111, PORT 112) and is an accelerated introductory course, appropriate for students with a high aptitude for language learners and/or for learners who already have some proficiency in another Romance language. Cannot be combined with PORT 101, 102, 103 for more than 15 credits of first-year Portuguese.

Course usage information

PORT 112. Intensive Beginning Portuguese. 5 Credits.

PORT 112 is the second part of a two-quarter sequence (PORT 111, PORT 112) and is an accelerated introductory course, appropriate for students with a high aptitude for language learners and/or for learners who already have some proficiency in another Romance language. Cannot be combined with PORT 101, 102, 103 for more than 15 credits of first-year Portuguese.
Prereq: PORT 111.

Course usage information

PORT 150. Lusofonia: The Portuguese-Speaking World. 4 Credits.

Topics in the history and contemporary cultures of the regions where Portuguese is spoken (Portugal, Brazil, Africa, Asia, and North America).

Course usage information

PORT 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PORT 201. Second Year Portuguese. 4 Credits.

Development of Brazilian Portuguese speaking, reading, writing and comprehension; study of short literary and cultural materials. Sequence with PORT 202, 203.
Prereq: PORT 103

Course usage information

PORT 202. Second-Year Portuguese. 4 Credits.

Development of Brazilian Portuguese speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension; study of short literary and cultural materials. Sequence with PORT 201, 203.
Prereq: PORT 201 or equivalent.

Course usage information

PORT 203. Second-Year Portuguese. 4 Credits.

Development of Brazilian Portuguese speaking, reading, writing, and comprehension; study of short literary and cultural materials. Sequence with PORT 201, 202.
Prereq: PORT 202 or equivalent.

Course usage information

PORT 301. Cultura e Lingua: Expressoes Artisticas. 4 Credits.

Develops advanced language skills through the study of key representations in Brazilian art, literature, film, and music. Taught in Portuguese. Prereq: PORT 203 or equivalent. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: PORT 203 or equivalent.

Course usage information

PORT 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

PORT 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

RL 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RL 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RL 404. Bilingual Internship. 2 Credits.

Bilingual internship opportunity in area schools or community agencies for students of French or Spanish. Repeatable in another term.
Prereq: third-year language competence.

Course usage information

RL 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Changing topics on issues relevant to study in two or more Romance languages. Recent topics include Travel Writing, Testimonial Writing, Caribbean Women Writers.
Pre-req: One 300-level literature course in any Romance language.

Course usage information

RL 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RL 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RL 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Changing topics on issues relevant to study in two or more Romance languages. A recent topic is Travel Literature.

Course usage information

RL 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RL 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RL 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RL 604. Bilingual Internship. 2 Credits.

A bilingual internship opportunity in area schools or community agencies for students of French or Spanish. Repeatable in another term.
Prereq: third-year language competence.

Course usage information

RL 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RL 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RL 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Teaching Methods offered fall term only. Other workshops may be offered. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

RL 609. Supervised Tutoring. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RL 620. Graduate Study in Romance Languages. 2-4 Credits.

Discussion of purposes, problems, and methods of graduate study in Romance languages. Elements of critical method, research techniques, scholarly writing, and professional development.

Course usage information

RL 623. Romance Languages Colloquium: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Seminar organized around a series of speakers exposes students to critical and theoretical issues central to the study of Romance languages and literatures. Repeatable for a maximum of 8 credits.

Courses

Course usage information

SPAN 101. First-Year Spanish. 5 Credits.

Emphasis on the development of speaking, reading, and writing skills; introduction to Hispanic culture. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish.

Course usage information

SPAN 102. First-Year Spanish. 5 Credits.

Emphasis on the development of speaking, reading, and writing skills; introduction to Hispanic culture. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish.
Prereq: SPAN 101.

Course usage information

SPAN 103. First-Year Spanish. 5 Credits.

Emphasis on the development of speaking, reading, and writing skills; introduction to Hispanic culture. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish.
Prereq: SPAN 102.

Course usage information

SPAN 111. Intensive Beginning Spanish. 5 Credits.

Intensive study for experienced language learners; introduction to Hispanic culture. Prereq: evidence of placement. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. Cannot be combined with SPAN 101, 102, 103 for more than 15 credits of first-year Spanish.
Prereq: previous study in Spanish or competence in another Romance language.

Course usage information

SPAN 112. Intensive Beginning Spanish. 5 Credits.

Intensive study for experienced language learners; introduction to Hispanic culture. Prereq: evidence of placement. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish. Cannot be combined with SPAN 101, 102, 103 for more than 15 credits of first-year Spanish.
Prereq: SPAN 111.

Course usage information

SPAN 150. Cultures of the Spanish-Speaking World. 4 Credits.

Each term, this topics course treats a different aspect of the rich cultural heritage of the Spanish-speaking world. Check the Class Schedule extended description for the current offering. Past topics include: dialects of Spanish; Jewish; Arabic, and Christian relations in medievel Iberia; Hispanic experience in the United States. Conducted in English.

Course usage information

SPAN 151. Spanish Cinema. 2 Credits.

Emphasizes basic oral communication and listening comprehension through weekly viewings of films in Spanish. Repeatable once for a maximum of 4 credits.

Course usage information

SPAN 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPAN 201. Second-Year Spanish. 4 Credits.

Continued development of Spanish-language skills; emphasis on diversity of Hispanic cultures. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish.
Prereq: first year language competence.

Course usage information

SPAN 202. Second-Year Spanish. 4 Credits.

Continued development of Spanish-language skills; emphasis on diversity of Hispanic cultures. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish.
Prereq: SPAN 201.

Course usage information

SPAN 203. Second-Year Spanish. 4 Credits.

Continued development of Spanish-language skills; emphasis on diversity of Hispanic cultures. Sequence. Conducted in Spanish.
Prereq: SPAN 202.

Course usage information

SPAN 218. Latino Heritage I. 5 Credits.

Designed for heritage learners—students who grew up with Spanish in their community and want to build communication skills in Spanish. Content focuses on personal experiences in U.S. Latino communities.Cannot be combined with SPAN 201, 202, 203 for more than 15 credits of second-year Spanish.
Prereq: placement through self-identification or placement by Spanish heritage language placement test.

Course usage information

SPAN 228. Latino Heritage II. 5 Credits.

Designed for heritage learners—students who grew up with Spanish in their community and want to continue developing communication skills in Spanish. Content focuses on personal experiences in U.S. Latino communities. Cannot be combined with SPAN 201, 202, 203 for more than 15 credits of second-year Spanish.
Prereq: SPAN 218 or placement by Spanish heritage language placement test.

Course usage information

SPAN 238. Spanish Around the World. 4 Credits.

Introduction to language variation (dialects) through the study of the places, peoples, history, and social differences that make the Spanish language what it is today.
Prereq: SPAN 103 or SPAN 112 or equivalent proficiency in Spanish language.

Course usage information

SPAN 248. Spanglish. 4 Credits.

Investigates the history and social impact of language contact between English and Spanish in what is now the United States. Taught in English, Spanish, and Spanglish. Prereq: SPAN 103 or SPAN 112.
Prereq: SPAN 103 or SPAN 112

Course usage information

SPAN 298. Temporary Group-Satisfying Course. 4 Credits.

Course usage information

SPAN 301. Cultura y Lengua: Identidades Hispanas. 4 Credits.

Develops advanced language skills through analysis of major historical influences in the cultures of Spanish-speaking regions: Spain, Latin America, and the United States. Taught in Spanish.
Prereq: SPAN 203 or 228.

Course usage information

SPAN 303. Cultura y lengua: expresiones artisticas. 4 Credits.

Develops advanced language skills through the study of cultural products (e.g., art, literature, film, music) in Spanish-speaking societies. Taught in Spanish.
Prereq: SPAN 203 or 228.

Course usage information

SPAN 305. Cultura y lengua: cambios sociales. 4 Credits.

Develops advanced language skills through the investigation of major currents of change in modern Spanish-speaking societies; gender issues, technology, revolution and counter-revolution.Taught in Spanish.
Prereq: SPAN 203 or 228.

Course usage information

SPAN 307. Oral Skills. 2 Credits.

Practice in improving listening, comprehension, and oral skills in Spanish. Communicative activities in class in addition to language laboratory work. Repeatable once when content changes for maximum of 4 credits.
Prereq: SPAN 203 or 228.

Course usage information

SPAN 308. Cultura y lengua: comunidades bilingues. 4 Credits.

Designed for heritage learners—students who grew up with Spanish in their community and want to continue developing communication skills in Spanish. Explores socio-linguistic dynamics of communities in which Spanish is in contact with another language. Open to all students. Taught in Spanish.
Prereq: SPAN 203 or 228.

Course usage information

SPAN 311. Advanced Writing in Spanish. 4 Credits.

This requirement for the Spanish major provides additional language development for students early on in the major, emphasizing academic writing skills in Spanish.
Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

Course usage information

SPAN 312. Spanish in the Media. 4 Credits.

Designed for heritage learners. Examines the role of Spanish in various forms of media such as television, Internet, and literature. Students practice advanced writing skills necessary to participate in argumentative writing and close textual readings.
Prereq: SPAN 308 or any two from SPAN 301, SPAN 303, SPAN 305; SPAN 308 is recommended.

Course usage information

SPAN 320. Intensive Spanish Grammar Review. 4 Credits.

Review and development of the more complex aspects of Spanish grammar with special attention to idiomatic usage.
Prereq: SPAN 203 or 228.

Course usage information

SPAN 322. Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics. 4 Credits.

Linguistic description of the Spanish language, including phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, history, and social and geographical variation.
Prereq: SPAN 308; one course from SPAN 301, SPAN 303, SPAN 305, SPAN 311, SPAN 312.

Course usage information

SPAN 324. Spanish Pronunciation and Phonetics. 4 Credits.

Study of Spanish sounds, rhythms, and intonation; supervised pronunciation practice. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: SPAN 308; one course from SPAN 301, SPAN 303, SPAN 305, SPAN 311, SPAN 312.

Course usage information

SPAN 341. Hispanic Cultures through Literature I. 4 Credits.

Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts, from 1100 to 1600. Series with SPAN 342, 343, 344.
Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

Course usage information

SPAN 342. Hispanic Cultures through Literature II. 4 Credits.

Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts, from the 16th century to the Latin American independences. Series with SPAN 341, 343, 344.
Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

Course usage information

SPAN 343. Hispanic Cultures through Literature III. 4 Credits.

Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts, from the revolutionary wars to the Spanish Civil War. Series with SPAN 341, 342, 344.
Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

Course usage information

SPAN 344. Hispanic Cultures through Literature IV. 4 Credits.

Introduces students to a variety of texts written in the Hispanic world in their literary, artistic, and historical contexts, from the 20th century into the 21st. Series with SPAN 341, 342, 343.
Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

Course usage information

SPAN 348. United States Latino Literature and Culture. 4 Credits.

Introduction to Hispanic literature written in the United States. Close reading and discussion of selected texts by Hispanic authors; emphasis on literary trends and themes.
Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

Course usage information

SPAN 350. Introduction to Poetry. 4 Credits.

Explores important aspects of Spanish poetry; reading poems from different periods of Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading.
Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

Course usage information

SPAN 351. Introduction to Theater. 4 Credits.

Explores important aspects of Spanish theater; reading plays from different periods of Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading.
Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

Course usage information

SPAN 353. Introduction to Narrative. 4 Credits.

Explores important aspects of Spanish narrative; reading texts from different periods of Spanish and Spanish American literature. Emphasizes formal aspects and critical reading.
Prereq: two from SPAN 301, 303, 305, 308.

Course usage information

SPAN 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPAN 403. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPAN 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPAN 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Golden Age Theater, Latin American Film, Medieval Iberian, Mexican Literature and Culture, 19th-Century Spanish Decadence, Postwar Spain, Testimonial Literature.
Prereq: two from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable. Special on-campus activities in Spanish.

Course usage information

SPAN 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPAN 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Literature and Democratic Transition, Race in Modern Los Angeles, Social Roots of Creativity.

Course usage information

SPAN 420. Spanish Linguistics: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Variable topics in Spanish linguistics, including advanced grammar, history of the Spanish language, the language of Iberia, Spanish sociolinguistics. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: Two from SPAN 320, 322, 324.

Course usage information

SPAN 424. History of the Spanish Language. 4 Credits.

Linguistic changes and social-historical influences on the development of Spanish from its roots in Latin to the diversity of modern dialects. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: Two from SPAN 320, 322, 324.

Course usage information

SPAN 425. Literary Translation. 4 Credits.

Variable topics include con textos, first issues, and cultural translation-transculturation in practice.
Prereq: SPAN 311 or SPAN 312; one course from SPAN 320, SPAN 322, SPAN 324, SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 428. Spanish in the United States. 4 Credits.

The history and description of the linguistic characteristics of and narratives about the use of Spanish within the United States. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: two from SPAN 320, SPAN 322, SPAN 324.

Course usage information

SPAN 431. Medieval Iberian Literature and Culture: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected topics on the literature and culture of the Iberian Peninsula from the 12th through the 16th centuries. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: two from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 432. Spanish Islamic Literature and Culture: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected topics on the Islamic literature and culture of the Iberian Peninsula from the 12th through the 17th centuries. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: two from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 433. Sephardic Literature and Culture: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected topics on the literature and culture of the Sephardic Jews from the 12th through the 20th centuries. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

SPAN 436. Contemporary Mexican Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Explores major aesthetics trends, genres, authors. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.
Prereq: two from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 437. Contemporary Latin American Verse: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Explores major aesthetic trends, authors, and works in contemporary Latin American poetry. Topics include avant-garde poetry, poetry and subjectivity, poetry and modernism. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.
Prereq: two from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 448. National Identities and Border Cultures in the Americas. 4 Credits.

Examines 19th and 21st century national formation and alternative forms of collective identity in the Americas through literary texts, historical documents and film. Offered alternate years.
Prereq: SPAN 311 or 312; and two from SPAN 320, SPAN 322, SPAN 324, SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344, SPAN 348.

Course usage information

SPAN 450. Colonial Latin American Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Representative works of Colonial Latin America. Recent topics include Mestizaje, Colonial Theater, Colonial Literature, Carlos Fuentes. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: two from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 451. Sor Juana and Her Context. 4 Credits.

The debate on women and the woman intellectual; aesthetic definitions and the social meaning of Renaissance and baroque. Taught in Spanish.
Prereq: two from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 452. Renaissance and Baroque Poetry. 4 Credits.

Petrarchism of Garcilaso and Herrera; traditional forms, especially the romance; poetry of Fray Luis de Leon, San Juan de la Cruz, Santa Teresa, Gongora, Lope de Vega, and Quevedo.
Prereq: two from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 460. Don Quixote. 4 Credits.

Careful reading of "Don Quixote" along with discussion of major critical topics and of its place and importance in literary history.
Prereq: three from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 466. Introduction to Spanish Golden Age. 4 Credits.

Survey of major figures and cultural issues in the Spanish Golden Age, c. 1500s–1700s.
Prereq: two from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 480. 19th-Century Spanish American Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics include issue of literary periods, authors, narrative and nation, genres, and indigenismo. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: two from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 490. 20th-Century Latin American Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Explores major literary trends, authors, and works. Recent topics are Avant-garde in the Mexican Revolution, Testimonial Literature, Latin American Theater. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: two from SPAN 341, SPAN 342, SPAN 343, SPAN 344.

Course usage information

SPAN 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Golden Age Theater, Latin American Film, Medieval Iberian, Mexican Literature and Culture, 19th-Century Spanish Decadence, Postwar Spain, Testimonial Literature.

Course usage information

SPAN 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

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SPAN 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Literature and Democratic Transition, Race in Modern Los Angeles, Social Roots of Creativity.

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SPAN 520. Spanish Linguistics: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Variable topics in Spanish linguistics. Recent topics include Spanish Phonology, History of the Spanish Language. Repeatable when topic changes.

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SPAN 524. History of the Spanish Language. 4 Credits.

Linguistic changes and social-historical influences on the development of Spanish from its roots in Latin to the diversity of modern dialects. Offered alternate years.

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SPAN 525. Literary Translation. 4 Credits.

Variable topics include con textos, first issues, and cultural translation-transculturation in practice.
Prereq: SPAN 420/520 recommended.

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SPAN 528. Spanish in the United States. 4 Credits.

The history and description of the linguistic characteristics of and narratives about the use of Spanish within the United States. Offered alternate years.

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SPAN 531. Medieval Iberian Literature and Culture: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected topics on the literature and culture of the Iberian Peninsula from the 12th through the 16th centuries. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits. Offered alternate years.

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SPAN 532. Spanish Islamic Literature and Culture: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected topics on the literature and culture of the Iberian Peninsula from the 12th through the 16th centuries. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits. Offered alternate years.

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SPAN 533. Sephardic Literature and Culture: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected topics on the literature and culture of the Sephardic Jews from the 12th through the 20th centuries. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits. Offered alternate years.

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SPAN 537. Contemporary Latin American Verse. 4 Credits.

Explores major aesthetic trends, authors, and works in contemporary Latin American poetry. Topics include avant-garde poetry, poetry and subjectivity, poetry and modernism. Repeatable thrice when topic changes for maximum of 16 credits.

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SPAN 548. National Identities and Border Cultures in the Americas. 4 Credits.

Examines 19th and 21st century national formation and alternative forms of collective identity in the Americas through literary texts, historical documents and film. Offered alternate years.

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SPAN 550. Colonial Latin American Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Representative works of Colonial Latin America. Recent topics include Mestizaje, Colonial Theater, Colonial Literature, Carlos Fuentes. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

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SPAN 551. Sor Juana and Her Context. 4 Credits.

The debate on women and the woman intellectual; aesthetic definitions and the social meaning of Renaissance and baroque. Taught in Spanish.

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SPAN 552. Renaissance and Baroque Poetry. 4 Credits.

Petrarchism of Garcilaso and Herrera; traditional forms, especially the romance; poetry of Fray Luis de Leon, San Juan de la Cruz, Santa Teresa, Gongora, Lope de Vega, and Quevedo.

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SPAN 566. Introduction to Spanish Golden Age. 4 Credits.

Survey of major figures and cultural issues in the Spanish Golden Age, c. 1500s–1700s.

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SPAN 580. 19th-Century Spanish American Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Topics include issue of literary periods, authors, narrative and nation, genres, and indigenismo. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

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SPAN 590. 20th-Century Latin American Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Explores major literary trends, authors, and works. Recent topics are Avant-garde in the Mexican Revolution, Latin American Theater. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

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SPAN 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPAN 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPAN 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPAN 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPAN 680. Advanced 19th-Century Spanish American Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected Latin American topics from literary periods, authors, genres, and aesthetic trends. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

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SPAN 690. Advanced 20th-Century Latin American Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Selected topics from literary periods, authors, genres, and aesthetic trends. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.