Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

http://reees.uoregon.edu

Jenifer Presto, Program Director
541-346-4065
541-345-5041 fax
175 Prince Lucien Campbell Hall

The Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Program is devoted to the study of the peoples living in the eastern third of Europe, throughout the northern steppes of Central Asia, and across Siberia to the Pacific Ocean. Settled over a territory that spans half the earth’s time zones, these peoples have created a complex mosaic of cultures, expressed in literature and art as well as in institutions and social forms. Over the centuries, these lands have come under the sway of several great world-historical civilizations and empires: the Byzantine, Mongolian, Ottoman Turkish, Holy Roman, Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and Soviet. These lands have felt the influence of Orthodox Christianity, Catholicism, Protestantism, Judaism, Islam, and Communism. At the intersection of many powerful forces, these lands experience the historical drama of what some call "modernization" with its challenge to customary ways of life. Yet, after centuries of massive transplantation and transformation, national and ethnic heritages survive. Customary ways and native self-consciousness, more diverse than anywhere else on the globe, express themselves with new vigor.

Visiting Faculty Members

The program sponsors extended stays by visiting Fulbright and International Research and Exchange Board scholars from Russia and Eastern Europe.

Overseas Study

Qualified students of Russian may spend a summer, semester, or academic year in the Commonwealth of Independent States—in the Council on International Educational Exchange (CIEE) Cooperative Russian Language Program, of which the University of Oregon is an affiliate. Participating CIEE schools include Novosibirsk State University and St. Petersburg University. Students may also participate in Moscow and St. Petersburg programs sponsored by the American Council of Teachers of Russian and at a direct exchange program with the University of Latvia. Opportunities also exist for study in the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Poland. Limited fellowship aid is available for these programs.

Students in University of Oregon overseas study programs enroll in courses with subject codes that are unique to individual programs. Special course numbers are reserved for overseas study. See International Affairs in the Academic Resources section of this catalog. Students interested in study in the Commonwealth of Independent States or in Eastern Europe should write or call the Overseas Program Coordinator, Office of International Affairs, 5209 University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403-5209; 541-346-3206.

Cultural Programs

The program sponsors lectures, panel discussions, symposiums, films, plays, exhibitions, concerts, and festivals. These presentations involve scholars from other institutions in the United States and Europe as well as specialists at the university. In addition, the program faculty engages in outreach activities with local schools, community groups, and organizations such as the Eugene-Irkutsk Sister City Committee. Students in the program organized a Russian Club.

Resources

The University of Oregon’s library has more than 130,000 volumes in Russian and other Slavic and East European languages, more than 60,000 on Russia and Eastern Europe in Western languages; and subscribes to more than 100 serial titles. The library also has a large collection of Russian and East European films. The bulk of the collection is in the humanities and social sciences.

Facilities at the well-known Yamada Language Center enhance the learning of Slavic and East European languages. For more information, visit the website.

Faculty

Katya E. Hokanson, associate professor (Russian literature, travel literature, cultural studies). B.A., 1984, Williams; M.A., 1988, Ph.D., 1994, Stanford. (1995)

Yelaina Kripkov, senior lecturer (Russian language, culture); coordinator, Russian language program. MA, 1983, Moscow State Pedagogical Institute; PhD, 1996, Kansas. (1995)

Julia Nemirovskaya, senior instructor (Russian literature and theater). MA, 1986, PhD, 1991, Moscow State. (2002)

Jenifer Presto, associate professor (19th- and 20th-century Russian literature, modernism, gender studies). A.B., 1985, Smith; M.A., 1988, Middlebury; M.A., 1989, Ph.D., 1996, Wisconsin, Madison. (2003)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Participating

Roy Bing Chan, East Asian languages and literatures (Chinese literature)

Heghine Hakobyan, library

Julie Hessler, history (20th-century Russia, Europe)

Ryan Tucker Jones, history (Russian and environmental history)

R. Alan Kimball, history (modern Russia)

Susanna Soojung Lim, honors college (19th- and 20th-century Russian literature)

Mikhail Myagkov, political science (comparative politics, formal political theory)

Steven Shankman, English (comparative literature, Russian novel)

Lara Ravitch, American English Institute

Stephen J. Shoemaker, religious studies (history of Eastern Christianity)

Carol T. Silverman, anthropology (performance, eastern Europe, gender)

Caleb Southworth, sociology (economic sociology, postsocialist societies, quantitative-historical methods)

Cynthia M. Vakareliyska, linguistics (Slavic linguistics)

Courtesy

Amanda Bird, courtesy instructor (folklore, translation, Persian literature). BA, 1994, Baylor; MA, 2006, Oregon. (2013)

Norma “Bean” Comrada, courtesy instructor (Slavic literature). BA, 1954, Whitman College; MS, 1983, Oregon. (2013)

Tamara Morris, courtesy professor (Russian language, culture of “Old Believers”). Baccalaureate, D. Banzarov; MA, 1984, Kransoyarsky State Pedagogical Institute; PhD, 1986, Institute of Russian Language. (2013)

Emeriti

Esther Jacobson-Tepfer, history of art and architecture

Ronald Wixman, geography 

Associated

John E. Bonine, law

Keith Eddins, planning, public policy and management (post-Communist Russia and Eastern Europe)

Alexander Kashirin, Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies

Sherwin Simmons, history of art and architecture

Andrew Verner, business

Lisa Wolverton, history

Undergraduate Studies

The program offers a bachelor of arts degree (BA) and a minor. The undergraduate certificate is inactive.

General Requirements

Fields of Concentration

The program offers the following concentrations for the undergraduate major and minor:

  • Russian language, literature, and culture
  • Russian and East European history, politics, and society

Courses with these focus areas are offered by the program and such participating departments as anthropology, geography, history, political science, and sociology. Any course taken that includes instruction on one of these focus areas and has at least 40 percent Russian, East European, former Soviet Eurasian, or Slavic content, including independent research undertaken by the student, may be applied to the field of concentration requirement with administrative approval. Students may petition to have courses taken in other disciplines count toward the concentration or elective requirement if the content of these courses meets the 40 percent standard. This applies to regularly scheduled courses and to independent reading and conference courses.

Students can request sample programs of study in the various concentrations from their advisor or from the program’s office.

Major Requirements

The major requires 36 graded credits; courses must be passed with grades of C– or better. Credits used to fulfill the language requirement may not be applied to the 36-credit requirement.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Language Courses
RUSS 101–103First-Year Russian 115
RUSS 201–203Second-Year Russian 115
RUSS 316–318Third-Year Russian 115
Field of Concentration Courses20
At least four upper-division courses in a chosen concentration 2
Elective Courses 316
Total Credits36
1

Three years of college-level Slavic language study is usually fulfilled by taking Russian language courses. Students may petition to substitute one year of a second Slavic language for one year of the primary Slavic language. The language option is chosen in consultation with program advisors.

2

 Two courses must be at the 400 level.

3

At least two 4-credit courses should be outside of the field of concentration. 

Double Majors

To apply for a double major, students must complete and submit a declaration form to the program office.

Honors in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

Majors who have an overall GPA of 3.50 by the end of the junior year and who are interested in honors should meet with their advisor, then submit a thesis proposal to the program’s director for approval. If approved, the student registers for a minimum of 4 credits in Thesis (403) under the supervision of a program faculty member. The thesis must be completed at least one term before the term of graduation.

Minor Requirements

The minor requires 24 graded credits; courses must be passed with a grade of C– or better. Courses taken to fulfill the language requirement may not be used to fulfill the 24-credit requirement.

Language Courses
RUSS 101–103First-Year Russian 115
RUSS 201–203Second-Year Russian 115
RUSS 316–318Third-Year Russian 115
Field of Concentration Courses12
Three upper-division courses in a chosen concentration 2
Elective Courses12
Total Credits24
1

Three years of college-level Slavic language study is usually fulfilled by taking Russian language courses. Students may petition to substitute one year of a second Slavic language for one year of the primary Slavic language. The language option is chosen in consultation with program advisors.

2

One course in the field of concentration must be at the 400 level.

Additional Requirements

There is no limit on the number of language courses taken at other universities, including courses taken abroad, that may be used to satisfy the language requirement for the major or minor, subject to an equivalency assessment by the Russian language coordinator. With respect to concentration and elective requirements, undergraduate majors may apply as many as 16 transfer credits to the major, but no more than 8 of these credits can be applied to the field of concentration. Undergraduate minors may apply up to 8 transfer credits to the minor, but no more than 4 of them can be applied to the field of concentration.

Secondary School Teaching Careers

The College of Education offers a fifth-year program for teaching licensure in foreign language. This program is described in the College of Education section of this catalog.

  • Master of Arts
  • Certificate

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years (Below is a sample for a Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies major with a concentration in Russian language, literature, and culture). There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

Bachelor of Arts in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
RUSS 101 First-Year Russian 5
WR 121 College Composition I 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 13
Winter
WR 122 College Composition II 4
RUSS 102 First-Year Russian 5
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 13
Spring
RUSS 103 First-Year Russian 5
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 9
 Total Credits 35
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
RUSS 201 Second-Year Russian 5
RUSS 204 Introduction to Russian Literature 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 13
Winter
RUSS 202 Second-Year Russian 5
RUSS 351 Russian Literature and Film 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 13
Spring
HIST 346 Imperial Russia 4
RUSS 203 Second-Year Russian 5
 Credits 9
 Total Credits 35
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
RUSS 316 Third-Year Russian 5
RUSS 434 Russian Literature: [Topic](Modernism) 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 13
Winter
RUSS 317 Third-Year Russian 5
PS 433 Marxism and Radical Thought 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 13
Spring
RUSS 318 Third-Year Russian 5
RUSS 445 Old Church Slavonic 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 13
 Total Credits 39
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
RUSS 436 Advanced Russian: [Topic] 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 8
Winter
JDST 213 The Jewish Encounter with Modernity 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 8
Spring
ANTH 430 Balkan Society and Folklore 4
 Credits 4
 Total Credits 20

Graduate Studies

The program offers a master of arts (MA) and a graduate certificate in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies. The center is affiliated with the master’s and PhD programs in comparative literature and linguistics, and students in the center have also successfully applied to PhD programs in history, geography, and other fields.

Master of Arts

Application

Graduate application instructions are available online. The application deadline for admission the following fall term is February 1. Applicants who are not seeking graduate fellowship support are considered for admission throughout the academic year if space is available in the program.

Incoming candidates for the master’s degree must meet with an advisor and take a Russian proficiency examination on the Friday before the beginning of their first academic term.

Graduate students are expected to meet regularly with their advisor and submit an updated program plan every spring term. Students and their advisors use degree planning sheets to design individual programs.

Master of Arts Degree Requirements

The MA in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies requires 40 graded graduate-level credits passed with a grade of B– or better and 9 thesis credits (taken pass/no pass), for a total of 49 graduate credits. Credits used to fulfill the language requirement may not be applied to the 49-credit requirement. The MA typically takes two years (six terms) to complete.

Language Courses
Four years of university study of a Slavic language or equivalent, plus reading competency as defined by a translation exam in the student’s field of concentration 1
Field of Concentration Courses
Four graded graduate-level courses in a chosen concentration16
Research and Thesis
REES 503Thesis9
or RUSS 503 Thesis
Elective Courses
Six graded graduate-level courses 224
Total Credits49
1

In exceptional cases, a student may petition to substitute one year of a second Slavic language or equivalent mastery for one of the years of the primary language, but must pass the reading exam. Native speakers of a Slavic language may petition to substitute an appropriate alternative measure of English competency to the translation exam.

2

Two courses may be in the field of concentration. The electives must include courses in at least two fields outside the student’s concentration.

Fields of Concentration

  • Russian literature
  • Slavic linguistics
  • Russian and East European history
  • Contemporary Russia, East Europe, and Eurasia

Additional Requirements

A written comprehensive examination on the field of concentration is typically taken the term prior to submission of the thesis. The thesis is defended before the candidate’s committee. The defense may include discussion of the comprehensive exam.

Graduate Certificate

The graduate certificate in Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies requires 32 graded graduate-level credits; courses must be passed with grades of B– or better. Credits used to fulfill the language requirement may not be applied to the 32-credit requirement.

Language Courses
Select one of the following:
Four years of college study or equivalent in one Slavic language
Total of four years of college study in two languages of the region
Field of Concentration Courses
Three graduate-level courses in chosen concentration12
Elective Courses
Four graduate-level courses 116
Total Credits28
1

One elective may be in the field of concentration.

Additional Requirements

A research paper written in conjunction with a course or as a separate reading course in the field of concentration.

Fields of Concentration

  • Russian literature
  • Slavic linguistics
  • Russian and East European history
  • Contemporary Russia, East Europe, and Eurasia

The certificate may be earned in conjunction with any MA or PhD degree. Courses taken to fulfill the graduate degree may also be used to fulfill certificate requirements. Master’s candidates in the program may earn the graduate certificate if the field of concentration chosen for the certificate is not the same as the one for the master’s degree.

Courses

Course usage information

REES 196. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 198. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 401. Research: [Topic]. 2-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 403. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 406. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 408. Colloquium: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 409. Supervised Tutoring: [Topic]. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 2-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 503. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 508. Colloquium: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 2-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 601. Research: [Topic]. 2-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 608. Colloquium: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

REES 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

RUSS 101. First-Year Russian. 5 Credits.

Elementary Russian grammar, conversation, reading, and composition.

Course usage information

RUSS 102. First-Year Russian. 5 Credits.

Elementary Russian grammar, conversation, reading, and composition.
Prereq: RUSS 101.

Course usage information

RUSS 103. First-Year Russian. 5 Credits.

Elementary Russian grammar, conversation, reading, and composition.
Prereq: RUSS 102.

Course usage information

RUSS 121. Spoken Russian: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Practice in improving Russian speech, comprehension, and listening skills. Exercises reinforce grammar and vocabulary learned in class instruction. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 6 credits.
Coreq: RUSS 101, 102, or 103.

Course usage information

RUSS 196. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 198. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Russian Film is a current topic. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

RUSS 201. Second-Year Russian. 5 Credits.

Intermediate Russian grammar, reading, conversation, and composition. Study of representative literary works.
Prereq: RUSS 103 or equivalent.

Course usage information

RUSS 202. Second-Year Russian. 5 Credits.

Intermediate Russian grammar, reading, conversation, and composition. Study of representative literary works.
Prereq: RUSS 201 or equivalent.

Course usage information

RUSS 203. Second-Year Russian. 5 Credits.

Intermediate Russian grammar, reading, conversation, and composition. Study of representative literary works.
Prereq: RUSS 202 or equivalent.

Course usage information

RUSS 204. Introduction to Russian Literature. 4 Credits.

Survey of Russian literature from its origins to the present; emphasis on Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and contemporary works. Readings, lectures, and discussions in English.

Course usage information

RUSS 205. Introduction to Russian Literature. 4 Credits.

Survey of Russian literature from its origins to the present; emphasis on Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and contemporary works. Readings, lectures, and discussions in English.

Course usage information

RUSS 206. Introduction to Russian Literature. 4 Credits.

Survey of Russian literature from its origins to the present; emphasis on Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, and contemporary works. Readings, lectures, and discussions in English.

Course usage information

RUSS 221. Spoken Russian. 1-2 Credits.

Practice in improving Russian speech, comprehension, and listening skills. Exercises reinforce grammar and vocabulary learned in class instruction. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 6 credits.
Coreq: RUSS 201, 202, or 203.

Course usage information

RUSS 240. Russian Culture. 4 Credits.

Comparative aesthetics and development of art, film, architecture, music, and literature in the context of Russian intellectual history. Readings, lectures, and discussions in English.

Course usage information

RUSS 309. Russian through Theater. 2-4 Credits.

Combined elements of Russian language, literature, and culture learned through participation in a theater production. Credits vary with degree of involvement. Repeatable when different theater production is offered.

Course usage information

RUSS 316. Third-Year Russian. 5 Credits.

Intermediate-to-advanced Russian. Further development of basic skills, with special attention to reading comprehension, conversational competence, grammatical accuracy, and cultural sophistication.
Prereq: RUSS 203 or equivalent.

Course usage information

RUSS 317. Third-Year Russian. 5 Credits.

Intermediate-to-advanced Russian. Further development of basic skills, with special attention to reading comprehension, conversational competence, grammatical accuracy, and cultural sophistication.
Prereq: RUSS 203 or equivalent.

Course usage information

RUSS 318. Third-Year Russian. 5 Credits.

Intermediate-to-advanced Russian. Further development of basic skills, with special attention to reading comprehension, conversational competence, grammatical accuracy, and cultural sophistication.
Prereq: RUSS 203 or equivalent.

Course usage information

RUSS 331. Russian Short Story. 4 Credits.

Analysis of short stories by important 19th and 20th century Russian writers in the context of social political and literary development. Readings in English. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

RUSS 334. Dostoevsky. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the novels and short stories of Dostoevsky. His literary, ethical, and political development. Readings and instruction in English.

Course usage information

RUSS 335. Tolstoy. 4 Credits.

Examines short and long works by Leo Tolstoy, focusing on ethical questions and Tolstoy's literary art. Readings and instruction In English.

Course usage information

RUSS 351. Russian Literature and Film. 4 Credits.

Introduction to great works of 19th-century Russian literature and analysis of the cinematic adaptation of these works by Western filmmakers.

Course usage information

RUSS 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Recent topics are Solzhenitsyn, Sex and Feminism in Russia. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

RUSS 401. Research: [Topic]. 2-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 403. Thesis. 3-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 406. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

RUSS 408. Colloquium: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Special on-campus activities. Conducted in Russian. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

RUSS 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Recent topics are Self and Other in Russian Literature and Film. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

RUSS 426. Classics of Russian Poetry: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Comprehensive study of selected topics in Russian poetry (e.g., Alexander Pushkin, Russian symbolism, acmeism, futurism, and contemporary poetry). Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

RUSS 434. Russian Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Comprehensive study of selected topics in Russian literature, (e.g., 20th-century, contemporary, and Old Russian literature). Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

RUSS 436. Advanced Russian: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Analysis of Russian texts, films, and TV broadcasts about selected topics in Russian culture, literature, politics, and economics with practice in comprehension, conversation, and composition. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: RUSS 318 or equivalent.

Course usage information

RUSS 440. Russian Phonology and Morphology. 4 Credits.

Russian phonology and morphology (sound system and word formation) Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

RUSS 444. Slavic Linguistics: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Comparative survey of Slavic languages, their relationships to each other, and the characterizing features of each individual language. Repeatable when topic changes.
Prereq: RUSS 203 or LING 290.

Course usage information

RUSS 445. Old Church Slavonic. 4 Credits.

Sound system and grammar of Old Church Slavonic; its role as a primary source of evidence on the development of the Slavic languages. Readings from Old Church Slavonic texts.
Prereq: RUSS 203 or LING 290 or equivalent.

Course usage information

RUSS 503. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

RUSS 508. Colloquium: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Special on-campus activities. Conducted in Russian. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

RUSS 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Recent topics are Self and Other in Russian Literature and Film. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

RUSS 526. Classics of Russian Poetry: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Comprehensive study of selected topics in Russian poetry (e.g., Alexander Pushkin, Russian symbolism, acmeism, futurism, and contemporary poetry). Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

RUSS 534. Russian Literature: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Comprehensive study of selected topics in Russian literature, (e.g., 20th-century, contemporary, and Old Russian literature). Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

RUSS 536. Advanced Russian: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Analysis of Russian texts, films, and TV broadcasts about selected topics in Russian culture, literature, politics, and economics with practice in comprehension, conversation, and composition. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

RUSS 540. Russian Phonology and Morphology. 4 Credits.

Russian phonology and morphology (sound system and word formation) Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

RUSS 544. Introduction to Slavic Languages. 4 Credits.

Comparative survey of Slavic languages, their relationships to each other, and the characterizing features of each individual language. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

RUSS 545. Old Church Slavonic. 4 Credits.

Sound system and grammar of Old Church Slavonic; its role as a primary source of evidence on the development of the Slavic languages. Readings from Old Church Slavonic texts.

Course usage information

RUSS 601. Research: [Topic]. 2-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 608. Colloquium: [Topic]. 2-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

RUSS 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.