Women's and Gender Studies

Carol Stabile, Department Head
541-346-5529
541-346-0652 fax
315 Hendricks Hall
1298 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403-1298
wgs@uoregon.edu

The Department of Women’s and Gender Studies offers students an interdisciplinary curriculum that focuses on the diverse experiences of women in both national and international contexts. The department also examines the meaning of gender as a socially constructed category that shapes personal identities, beliefs, opportunities, and behaviors. The wide range of courses explores the intersections of gender, race, class, and sexuality; the institutional structures that have an impact on women’s and men’s lives; and the broad range of feminist theory that seeks to explain and influence women’s status in society. Among the areas of emphasis in women’s and gender studies are gender and sexuality, queer studies, third-world feminism, cultural representation and literature, women and labor, feminist theory, critical race feminism, immigration and citizenship, and social activism.

Core and affiliated faculty members in the department come from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives including history, literature, anthropology, sociology, geography, environmental studies, ethnic studies, philosophy, religious studies, architecture and fine arts, music, Romance and Germanic languages, political science, public policy, and law.

Any student may take women’s and gender studies courses. Some students take a few courses to complement the curriculum in another major. Others choose to fulfill the requirements for a major in women’s and gender studies or a minor in women’s and gender studies or in queer studies.

Most women’s and gender studies courses satisfy group and multicultural requirements. For courses approved to fulfill these requirements, see the current list on the registrar’s website.

Faculty

Oluwakemi Balogun, assistant professor (globalization, nationalism, African studies). BA, Pomona College, 2003; PhD, California, Berkeley, 2012. (2013)

Yvonne A. Braun, associate professor (gender and development, political ecology, social inequality). BA, 1994, State University of New York, Geneseo; MA, 2000, PhD, 2005, California, Irvine. (2005)

Judith Raiskin, associate professor (postcolonial literature, feminist theory, sexuality). BA, 1979, California, Berkeley; MA, 1981, Chicago; PhD, 1989, Stanford. (1995)

Elizabeth Reis, professor (U.S. women’s history, history of sexuality, women and religion). AB, 1980, Smith; MA, 1982, Brown; PhD, 1991, California, Berkeley. (2002)

Carol Stabile, professor (gender, race, and class in the media). AB, 1983, Mount Holyoke College; MA, 1985, PhD, 1992, Brown. (2008)

Stephanie "Lani" Teves, assistant professor (indigenous feminisms, native studies, performance studies). BA, 2002, MA, 2005, Hawaii, Hilo; PhD, 2012, Michigan, Ann Arbor. (2014)

Emerita

Barbara Corrado Pope, professor emerita. BA, 1964, Hiram; MA, 1966, Iowa; PhD, 1981, Columbia. (1976)

Linda O. Fuller, professor emerita. BA, 1966, MA, 1977, PhD, 1985, California, Berkeley. (1989)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Participating

Joan R. Acker, sociology

Susan C. Anderson, German and Scandinavian

Monique Balbuena, honors college

Diane B. Baxter, anthropology

Erin Beck, political science

Aletta Biersack, anthropology

Louise M. Bishop, honors college

Elizabeth A. Bohls, English

Sara N. Brownmiller, library

Krista Chronister, counseling psychology and human services

Suzanne Clark, English

Jane K. Cramer, political science

Dianne M. Dugaw, English

Maram Epstein, East Asian languages and literatures

Caroline Forell, law

Lisa Freinkel, English

Jennifer J. Freyd, psychology

Alison Gash, political science

Lisa M. Gilman, English

Amalia Gladhart, Romance languages

Bryna Goodman, history

Sangita Gopal, English

Deborah A. Green, Judaic studies

Michael Hames-Garcia, ethnic studies

Leslie J. Harris, law

Ellen Herman, history

Jocelyn Hollander, sociology

Mary Jaeger, classics

Lamia Karim, anthropology

Lauren J. Kessler, journalism and communication

Linda Kintz, English

Cheris Kramarae, Center for the Study of Women in Society

C. Anne Laskaya, English

Kathryn A. Lynch, environmental studies

Bonnie Mann, philosophy

Gabriela Martinez, journalism and communication

Barbara D. May, Romance languages

Michelle McKinley, law

Karen McPherson, Romance languages

Debra L. Merskin, journalism and communication

Quinn Miller, English

Fabienne Moore, Romance languages

Geraldine Moreno Black, anthropology

Sandra L. Morgen, anthropology

Madonna L. Moss, anthropology

Kari Norgaard, sociology

Dorothee Ostmeier, German and Scandinavian

Eileen M. Otis, sociology

Priscilla P. Ovalle, English

Amanda W. Powell, Romance languages

Scott L. Pratt, philosophy

Jenifer Presto, comparative literature

F. Regina Psaki, Romance languages

Suzanne E. Rowe, law

Nancy E. Shurtz, law

Carol T. Silverman, anthropology

Beata Stawarska, philosophy

Leslie H. Steeves, journalism and communication

Lynn Stephen, anthropology

Analisa Taylor, Romance languages

Courtney Thorsson, English

Merle H. Weiner, law

Anita M. Weiss, international studies

Louise Westling, English

Elizabeth A. Wheeler, English

Frances J. White, anthropology

Lisa Wolverton, history

Mary E. Wood, English

Priscilla Yamin, political science

Naomi Zack, philosophy

Preparation

No specific high school preparation is necessary. Students who transfer to the university from other colleges may apply as many as 8 credits of women’s and gender studies courses to the major or to the minors.

Careers

An understanding of gender and of women’s experiences, abilities, and needs is an asset to careers in such fields as education, social service, government, business, law, medicine, the ministry, journalism, media, technology, counseling, and child care. In addition, a background in women’s and gender studies can be used as a basis for entering a growing number of graduate programs that emphasize the study of women or gender.

Major Requirements

The Department of Women’s and Gender Studies offers an undergraduate major leading to a bachelor of arts (BA) or bachelor of science (BS) degree. Students may major in women’s and gender studies alone or as one of two or more majors. Majors must construct their programs in consultation with women’s and gender studies advisors.

Graded courses in the major must be completed with grades of C– or higher. No more than 8 credits taken pass/no pass in these courses may be counted toward the major.

At least 32 credits must be in upper-division courses. At least 24 upper-division credits must be taken at the University of Oregon. Women’s and gender studies majors must attain a grade point average of 2.50 or higher in courses applied to the major.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Core Courses
WGS 101Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies4
WGS 303Women and Gender in American History4
WGS 315History and Development of Feminist Theory4
WGS 321Feminist Perspectives: Identity, Race, Culture4
WGS 351Introduction to Global Feminisms4
WGS 352Gender, Literature, and Culture4
WGS 411Feminist Praxis (offered fall term only)4
Electives
WGS upper division courses8
WGS or other code approved courses (8 can be lower division courses)12
Total Credits48

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

Core Courses
WGS 101Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies4
WGS 303Women and Gender in American History4
WGS 315History and Development of Feminist Theory4
WGS 321Feminist Perspectives: Identity, Race, Culture4
WGS 351Introduction to Global Feminisms4
WGS 352Gender, Literature, and Culture4
WGS 411Feminist Praxis (offered fall term only)4
Electives
WGS upper division courses8
WGS or other code approved courses (8 can be lower division courses)12
Total Credits48

Courses used to satisfy major requirements must be taken for letter grades except for the following courses:

WGS 403Thesis1-12
WGS 405Reading and Conference: [Topic]1-5
WGS 409Practicum: [Topic]1-5
WGS 413Feminist Pedagogy2

Senior Thesis

Students interested in producing a substantial piece of original research and writing may elect to write a senior thesis in women’s and gender studies. Eligible students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.50 in women’s and gender studies courses.

Students producing a senior thesis should expect to do the following work over the course of a full year prior to their graduation.

Summer and Fall

Students should identify a primary advisor who is either a faculty member in women’s and gender studies or an affiliate faculty member (see website for list of affiliates). By the end of the fall term, they should have a complete draft of a research proposal approved by their thesis advisor. Proposals will be five to eight pages in length and will identify an important issue in the field of gender-sexuality studies and the question or questions the student wishes to pursue about the topic. If an affiliate faculty member is advising the student, the student must have their proposal approved by their primary advisor in women's and gender studies as well. Students should ideally take research or reading credits with their advisor during fall term.

Winter

Students must register for Reading and Conference: [Topic] (WGS 405) and Research: [Topic] (WGS 601).
They spend winter term conducting research and writing the thesis, working closely with their advisors and attending the research course.
By the end of winter term, students should have completed their research.

Spring

Students write, revise, and produce the thesis. A first draft is due in the third or fourth week of the term. A revised final draft is due in the sixth or seventh week of spring term. The length of a senior thesis will vary, but typically they are thirty-five to fifty pages long.

Honors in Women’s and Gender Studies

To graduate with honors in women’s and gender studies, a student must

  1. have an overall grade point average for UO and transfer credits of at least 3.50 through the winter term prior to graduation
  2. complete a senior thesis
  3. gain approval for a research proposal from the department head during fall term of the academic year in which the thesis is completed
  4. successfully complete Reading and Conference: [Topic] (WGS 405) for thesis research during the academic year in which it is completed
  5. register for a minimum of 4 credits in Thesis (WGS 403)

The thesis must be completed and approved by the advisor and a second reader, chosen from the WGS faculty by the student, by Monday of the fifth week of the term in which the student intends to graduate with honors. The student’s performance on the thesis and on courses taken during the senior year will be reviewed before the honors distinction is granted. Obtain complete instructions and required forms from the women’s and gender studies office.

Women’s and Gender Studies Minor Requirements

WGS 101Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies4
WGS courses 18
WGS or other code approved courses (8 can be lower division courses)12
Total Credits24
1

History and Development of Feminist Theory (WGS 315) strongly suggested.

Additional Requirements

No more than 8 credits in Practicum: [Topic] (WGS 409) may be counted toward the minor. No more than 8 credits may be taken pass/no pass; no more than 8 credits may count toward both the minor and the student's major. Graded courses in the minor must be completed with grades of C– or higher. At least 16 credits applied to the women’s and gender studies minor must be taken at the University of Oregon.

Students must apply for the minor in the women’s and gender studies office well in advance of graduation for transcript evaluation. In order to be eligible for the minor, students must complete all degree requirements and a major in another academic department.

Queer Studies Minor Requirements

WGS 201Introduction to Queer Studies4
WGS course focused on queer studies 14
WGS or other department courses 116
Total Credits24
1

 A minimum of 16 of these 20 credits must be earned in upper-division courses.

Students wishing to minor in queer studies should consult frequently with a women’s and gender studies advisor to determine which courses offered during any given academic year will count toward the fulfillment of the 20 selectable credits. A minimum of 16 of the 24 total credits for the minor must be earned at the University of Oregon. The other 8 may be earned through successful completion of preapproved courses from another university or approved overseas program. A minimum of 16 of the 24 credits must be graded. Students must complete all 24 credits with a grade of P or C– or better.

Students must apply for the queer studies minor in the women’s and gender studies office well in advance of graduation for transcript evaluation. In order to be eligible for the minor, students must complete all degree requirements and a major in women’s and gender studies or another academic department.

Graduate Studies

The graduate certificate in women’s and gender studies requires 24 credits in courses approved by the Women’s and Gender Studies Committee. At least 12 of these credits must be in core courses in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. At least 8 of these credits must be in approved graduate courses offered in other departments.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

Core Courses
Select WGS courses totaling 12 credits from the following:12
Seminar: [Topic]
Feminist Praxis
Feminist Pedagogy
Sexuality Studies: [Topic]
Gender, Environment, and Development
Global Issues and Perspectives: [Topic]
Reading and Conference: [Topic] 1
Seminar: [Topic]
Practicum: [Topic] 1
Other Courses
Approved graduate courses in other departments8
WGS or other department graduate course4
Total Credits24
1

Indicates a variable-credit course. The student must declare the credit value upon registering online—e.g., Practicum: [Topic] (WGS 609).

Additional Requirements

No more than 4 credits in Reading and Conference: [Topic] (WGS 605) and Practicum: [Topic] (WGS 609) can be applied to the certificate.

No more than 8 credits may be taken pass/no pass without specific approval.

Applicants should arrange an appointment with the department head.

Courses

Course usage information

WGS 101. Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies. 4 Credits.

Interdisciplinary examination of the diverse experiences, status, and contributions of women in the United States. Topics include social construction of gender, race, sexualities, work, class, violence, and health.

Course usage information

WGS 198. Colloquium: [Topic]. 1,2 Credit.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 201. Introduction to Queer Studies. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the study of sexuality and society from a queer studies interdisciplinary perspective.

Course usage information

WGS 303. Women and Gender in American History. 4 Credits.

Focuses on women and gender in America, highlighting how diverse women have experienced gender roles and sexism since the 17th century.

Course usage information

WGS 315. History and Development of Feminist Theory. 4 Credits.

Feminist theory from the Enlightenment through the Second Wave, with special emphasis on the diverse theories of the 1960s to the present.
Prereq: WGS 101.

Course usage information

WGS 321. Feminist Perspectives: Identity, Race, Culture. 4 Credits.

Examines intersections of race and ethnicity, class, sexuality, and gender in the history and lives of United States women of color. Explores definitions of community, culture, and identity.
Prereq: one course WGS or ES 101.

Course usage information

WGS 331. Science, Technology, and Gender. 4 Credits.

Topics include the role of gender in the practice of science and the impact of sexism and racism on the development of science and technology.
Prereq: WGS 101 or equivalent.

Course usage information

WGS 341. Women, Work, and Class. 4 Credits.

Explores contexts and cultural attitudes shaping the women's market and domestic labor including race, sexuality, age, and class as well as occupational segregation and control.

Course usage information

WGS 351. Introduction to Global Feminisms. 4 Credits.

Exploration of feminist activism and women’s movements globally, organizing to challenge the state, civil society, international agencies, and corporations for a more just world.

Course usage information

WGS 352. Gender, Literature, and Culture. 4 Credits.

Examines literary and other cultural expressions of gendered experience through formal analysis. Genres include novels, short stories, poetry, plays, and visual cultural production.

Course usage information

WGS 361. Gender in Film and Television. 4 Credits.

Students read, view, examine, discuss, and write about film and television in terms of gender and feminist and queer theory. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

WGS 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 403. Thesis. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable with program director's and thesis adviser's consent for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

WGS 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 406. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

WGS 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

A current topic is Feminist Research Issues. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

WGS 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 411. Feminist Praxis. 4 Credits.

Combined internship and seminar explores the history and politics of community agencies and the relationship of feminist theory to practice.
Prereq: one course WGS or equivalent.

Course usage information

WGS 413. Feminist Pedagogy. 2 Credits.

Surveys strategies for facilitating discussions in women's and gender studies classes and the special problems of teaching about gender, race, and sexuality.
Prereq: WGS 101 or equivalent.

Course usage information

WGS 422. Sexuality Studies: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Various topics in sexuality studies, including the relationship between gender and sexuality and between queer studies and women's and gender studies. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.
Prereq: WGS 101 or 201.

Course usage information

WGS 432. Gender, Environment, and Development. 4 Credits.

Surveys gender and political, economic, and cultural strategies for development and environmental change around the world.
Pre- or coreq: WGS 101.

Course usage information

WGS 451. Global Issues and Perspectives: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Designed to deepen understanding of diverse global issues and perspectives related to women’s and gender studies. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

WGS 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

A current topic is Feminist Research Issues. Repeatable when topic changes.

Course usage information

WGS 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 511. Feminist Praxis. 4 Credits.

Combined internship and seminar explores the history and politics of community agencies and the relationship of feminist theory to practice.
Prereq: one course WGS or equivalent.

Course usage information

WGS 513. Feminist Pedagogy. 2 Credits.

Surveys strategies for facilitating discussions in women's and gender studies classes and the special problems of teaching about gender, race, and sexuality.

Course usage information

WGS 522. Sexuality Studies: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Various topics in sexuality studies, including the relationship between gender and sexuality and between queer studies and women's and gender studies. Repeatable twice when topic changes for maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

WGS 532. Gender, Environment, and Development. 4 Credits.

Surveys gender and political, economic, and cultural strategies for development and environmental change around the world.

Course usage information

WGS 551. Global Issues and Perspectives: [Topic]. 4 Credits.

Designed to deepen understanding of diverse global issues and perspectives related to women’s and gender studies. Repeatable twice when topic changes for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course usage information

WGS 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

WGS 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-4 Credits.

Repeatable.