Education Studies

Edward M. Olivos, Department Head
541-346-3404
124 Lorry I. Lokey Education Building

License and degree programs in the Department of Education Studies prepare professionals to work in education. For teaching in elementary grade levels (K–5), the undergraduate major in educational foundations leads to a bachelor of arts (BA) or bachelor of science (BS) degree in educational foundations. Undergraduates may also earn a certificate in education foundations—secondary. For teaching in secondary grade levels (6–12), the certificate in educational foundations—secondary is intended to complement the subject area major. 

The master's-level programs include

  1. a degree in curriculum and teaching with a specialization in elementary multiple subjects education or secondary education, which includes a recommendation for a state-approved teaching license and a master of education (MEd) degree
  2. a program in curriculum and teacher education for those already holding a teaching license and are seeking a master of science (MS) degree
  3. add-on endorsements for licensed teachers in English for speakers of other languages and multicultural, multilingual reading

The doctoral degree program leads to a doctor of philosophy degree (PhD) in critical and sociocultural studies in education.

Faculty

Joanna Goode, associate professor (computer science education, urban education, educational equity and inclusion). BS 1997, MEd, 1998, PhD, 2004, California, Los Angeles. (2005)

Jeanne Nagayama Hall, senior instructor (elementary education, educational psychology, freshman mentoring); undergraduate field experience coordinator. BA, 1978, Azusa Pacific; MEd, 1984, Washington (Seattle). (2002)

Julia Heffernan, lecturer (sexuality and gender studies in education, social studies and language arts curriculum, educational equity and inclusion); graduate director, UO Teach. BS, 1990, MA, 2004, PhD, 2010, Oregon (2013)

Jenefer Husman, associate professor (educational psychology). BS, 1992, Evergreen State College; MA, 1996, PhD, 1998, Texas, Austin. (2016)

Michelle Jacob, professor (Indigenous studies in education, health, gender and decolonization). BA, 1998, MA, 2001, California State, San Marcos; PhD, 2004, California, Santa Barbara. (2016) 

Abby Lane, instructor (bilingual education, English language learners, migrant education). BA, 1983, California State, Northridge; MEd, 1992, Oregon. (2000)

Audrey Lucero, assistant professor (literacy, bilingualism, dual-language schooling), BA, BS, 1996, Boston; MA, 2002, Seattle; PhD, 2011, Washington (Seattle). (2011)

Lisa A. Mazzei, associate professor (qualitative research methodology, curriculum theory, whiteness studies). BA, 1983, Marshall; MA, 1984, PhD, 1996, Ohio State. (2012)

Edward M. Olivos, associate professor (bilingual education, Latinos and education, teacher preparation). BA, 1991, MA, 1997, PhD, 2003, San Diego State. (2007)

Robin Patterson, instructor (elementary education, high school special and alternate education, school administration); mid-high practicum placement coordinator. BA, 1982, Oregon College of Education; MEd, 1984, Western Oregon State. (2014)

Jerry L. Rosiek, associate professor (multicultural education, qualitative research methods, teacher knowledge). BA, 1987, BS, 1988, Texas A & M; PhD, 1997, Stanford. (2005)

Jennifer Ruef, assistant professor (mathematics education, equity, inclusion and social justice). BS, 1990, MS, 2005, Wisconsin, Madison; PhD, 2016, Stanford. (2016)

Leilani Sabzalian, assistant professor (Indigenous studies in education, tribal–critical race theory, teacher education). BA, 2001, MEd, 2002, PhD, 2015, Oregon. (2017)

Alison Schmitke, senior lecturer (social foundations of education, social studies curriculum, sports education); director, undergraduate degree program. BA, 1994, Willamette; MEd, 1996, Portland State; PhD, 2008, Alabama. (2006)

James A. Stapleton, research assistant professor (chemical and bioengineering). BS, 2000, California, Berkeley; MS, 2006, PhD, 2009, Stanford. (2015)

Sarah Stapleton, assistant professor (food and environmental justice, social contexts of science and environmental education). BA, 2001, Sweet Briar College; EdM, 2005, Harvard; PhD, 2015, Michigan State. (2015)

Kara Whipple, instructor (special education, social justice and conflict resolution in educational systems). BS, 2000, Delaware; MEd, 2006, MS, 2012, Oregon. (2013)

Emeriti

Juliet "Jill" A. Baxter, associate professor emeritus. AB, 1975, MA, 1977, PhD, 1987, Stanford; MA, 1977, Minnesota. (2002)

Edna P. DeHaven, professor emerita. BS, 1951, Oregon College of Education; MEd, 1962, PhD, 1969, Oregon. (1969)

Gary W. Ferrington, senior instructor emeritus. BS, 1964, Portland State; MS, 1967, Southern California. (1967)

M. D. "Mark" Gall, professor emeritus. BA, 1963, MEd, 1963, Harvard; PhD, 1968, California, Berkeley. (1975)

Judith K. Grosenick, professor emerita. BS, 1964, Wisconsin, Oshkosh; MS, 1966, PhD, 1968 Kansas. (1984)

William H. Harris, associate professor emeritus. BA, 1949, Willamette; BS, 1951, MS, 1953, Eastern Oregon; DEd, 1967, Oregon. (1969)

Ray E. Hull, professor emeritus. BS, 1958, MS, 1962, Oregon State; DEd, 1969, Oregon. (1970)

William E. Lamon, associate professor emeritus. BS, 1964, San Francisco; MS, 1965, California State; PhD, 1968, California, Berkeley. (1972)

David G. Moursund, professor emeritus. BA, 1958, Oregon; MS, 1960, PhD, 1963, Wisconsin, Madison. (1967)

Ione F. Pierron, associate professor emerita of librarianship. BA, 1936, Puget Sound; MA, 1955, Minnesota; MS, 1960, Oregon. (1948)

Mildred C. Robeck, professor emerita. BA, 1951, MEd, 1954, PhD, 1958, Washington (Seattle). (1967)

John E. Suttle, professor emeritus. BS, 1948, Texas; MEd, 1952, Colorado; EdD, 1960, Texas. (1959)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Educational Foundations

The purpose of the educational foundations major is to prepare future professionals in education and related fields: critical thinkers, well-informed about theory and practice, who possess the knowledge and skills to be agents of change in economically, racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse communities. The program focuses on content preparation and provides students with a sophisticated understanding of the intersections of multiple disciplines within larger historical and contemporary themes.

The two-year program, completed during the junior and senior years, prepares undergraduate students for admission into master’s-level teacher certification programs or other Graduate School programs such as social work or psychology. The educational foundations major does not result in a teaching license.

Major Requirements

Students planning to major in educational foundations enter the university as education premajors. Transfer students and university students from other majors may become premajors by submitting a Request for Addition or Deletion Major form, available online. Premajors are not eligible to take most 300- and 400-level education courses. Premajor status does not guarantee admission to the educational foundations major.

The major is designed as a two-year program completed during the undergraduate junior and senior year. The major requires core courses in five areas: learning, teaching, and assessment; curriculum theory; technology and education; literacy; and equality of opportunity. Additional courses are required in mathematics, science, and a variety of other subjects, including reading, art, music, and physical education.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements


Premajor Courses
EDST 111Educational Issues and Problems4
EDST 199Special Studies: [Topic]4
EDST 220Beginning Applications in Educational Technology4
EDST 225School and Representation in Film4
EDST 231Teaching in the 21st Century4
Learning, Teaching, and Assessment
EDST 331Autobiography of Schooling4
EDST 332–333Learning, Teaching, and Assessment I-II6
EDST 338–339Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment I-II2
Curriculum Theory
EDST 342–343Curriculum Studies I-II8
Technology and Education
EDST 422Technology Education4
Literacy
EDST 463Foundations of Reading4
EDST 464Multicultural Literacy4
Equality of Opportunity
EDST 420Living in a Stratified Society4
Select two of the following:6
Equal Opportunity: Ecojustice and Education
Equal Opportunity: Poverty
Equal Opportunity: Racism
Equal Opportunity: Patriarchy
Equal Opportunity: Homophobia
Equal Opportunity: Colonization and Genocide
Equal Opportunity: Diaspora and Immigration
EDST 458Observation: Equal Opportunity I 11
Additional Requirements
Mathematics courses
Science courses
Art courses
Music courses
Physical education courses
Total Credits63
1

 Course may be repeated twice in conjunction with registering for an Equal Opportunity course.

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements


Premajor Courses
EDST 111Educational Issues and Problems4
EDST 199Special Studies: [Topic]4
EDST 220Beginning Applications in Educational Technology4
EDST 225School and Representation in Film4
EDST 231Teaching in the 21st Century4
Learning, Teaching, and Assessment
EDST 331Autobiography of Schooling4
EDST 332–333Learning, Teaching, and Assessment I-II6
EDST 338–339Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment I-II2
Curriculum Theory
EDST 342–343Curriculum Studies I-II8
Technology and Education
EDST 422Technology Education4
Literacy
EDST 463Foundations of Reading4
EDST 464Multicultural Literacy4
Equality of Opportunity
EDST 420Living in a Stratified Society4
Select two of the following:6
Equal Opportunity: Ecojustice and Education
Equal Opportunity: Poverty
Equal Opportunity: Racism
Equal Opportunity: Patriarchy
Equal Opportunity: Homophobia
Equal Opportunity: Colonization and Genocide
Equal Opportunity: Diaspora and Immigration
EDST 458Observation: Equal Opportunity I 11
Additional Requirements
Mathematics courses
Science courses
Art courses
Music courses
Physical education courses
Total Credits63
1

 Course may be repeated twice in conjunction with registering for an Equal Opportunity course.

Application and Admission

Students must submit a formal application for admission to the major. Application to the major is made before beginning the junior year of study and may be made only during winter term of each academic year. Seniors who transfer from another university or change their major may be admitted but are not guaranteed graduation within one year. Application materials and directions are available on the College of Education website.

Certificate in Educational Foundations—Secondary

UO undergraduates who are preparing for careers as middle or high school teachers major in the subject area they will teach. The certificate in educational foundations—secondary is designed to complement the subject area preparation of undergraduates planning to be middle or high school teachers. The certificate gives future secondary teachers an advantage by giving them the opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for teaching in the classroom before they enroll in Graduate School. This preprofessional certificate prepares highly competitive students for admission into graduate teacher education programs or other graduate programs in Oregon and around the country.

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years. There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

Bachelor of Arts in Educational Foundations

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
WR 121 College Composition I 4
First term of first-year second-language sequence 4
EDST 111 Educational Issues and Problems 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
Winter
WR 122 College Composition II 4
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in science The Educational Foundations Program requires six science courses4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in social science 4
EDST 225 School and Representation in Film 4
EDST 471 Foundations of Algebra Learning 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
EDST 472 Foundations of Geometry Learning 4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
Third term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in science 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
EDST 331 Autobiography of Schooling 4
EDST 411 Childhood Studies 3
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 15
Winter
EDST 332 Learning, Teaching, and Assessment I 3
EDST 338 Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment I 1
EDST 420 Living in a Stratified Society 4
AAD 430 Youth Arts Curriculum and Methods 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 16
Spring
EDST 333 Learning, Teaching, and Assessment II 3
EDST 339 Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment II 1
EDST 440 Physical Education for Diverse Learners 3
EDST 422 Technology Education 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 15
 Total Credits 46
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
EDST 456 Equal Opportunity: Colonization and Genocide 3
EDST 458
Observation: Equal Opportunity I
or Equal Opportunity: Diaspora and Immigration
1
MUS 322 Music Fundamentals 3
SPED 411 Foundations of Disability I 3
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 14
Winter
EDST 342 Curriculum Studies I 4
EDST 463 Foundations of Reading 4
 Credits 8
Spring
EDST 343 Curriculum Studies II 4
EDST 464 Multicultural Literacy 4
EDST 451 Equal Opportunity: Ecojustice and Education 3
EDST 458
Observation: Equal Opportunity I
or Equal Opportunity: Homophobia
1
 Credits 12
 Total Credits 34

Bachelor of Science in Educational Foundations

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
WR 121 College Composition I 4
EDST 111 Educational Issues and Problems 4
MATH 211 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics I 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
Winter
WR 122 College Composition II 4
MATH 212 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics II 4
General-education course in social science 4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
Spring
MATH 213 Fundamentals of Elementary Mathematics III 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
Premajor course 4
 Credits 16
Winter
General-education course in science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
General-education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
Minor elective Possible requirement for minor4
 Credits 16
Spring
General-education course in science 4
General-education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
Minor electives Possible requirements for minor8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
EDST 331 Autobiography of Schooling 4
EDST 411 Childhood Studies 3
General-education course in science 4
Minor elective course Possible requirement for minor4
 Credits 15
Winter
EDST 332 Learning, Teaching, and Assessment I 3
EDST 338 Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment I 1
EDST 420 Living in a Stratified Society 4
AAD 430 Youth Arts Curriculum and Methods 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 16
Spring
EDST 333 Learning, Teaching, and Assessment II 3
EDST 339 Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment II 1
EDST 422 Technology Education 4
EDST 440 Physical Education for Diverse Learners 3
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 15
 Total Credits 46
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
EDST 456 Equal Opportunity: Colonization and Genocide 3
EDST 458
Observation: Equal Opportunity I
or Equal Opportunity: Diaspora and Immigration
1
MUS 322 Music Fundamentals 3
SPED 411 Foundations of Disability I 3
 Credits 10
Winter
EDST 342 Curriculum Studies I 4
EDST 463 Foundations of Reading 4
 Credits 8
Spring
EDST 343 Curriculum Studies II 4
EDST 464 Multicultural Literacy 4
EDST 451 Equal Opportunity: Ecojustice and Education 3
EDST 458
Observation: Equal Opportunity I
or Equal Opportunity: Homophobia
1
 Credits 12
 Total Credits 30

Master of Education in Curriculum and Teaching

Students pursuing a master of education degree (MEd) are admitted to the curriculum and teaching major through the K–12 licensure program, UO Teach, which emphasizes strong context area expertise, equity literacy, cultural responsive teaching, and extensive field experience. Completion of the program leads to a teaching license and a master of education degree (MEd) in curriculum and teaching.

The UO Teach program offers general-education specializations in elementary multiple subjects and secondary education in the following content endorsement areas:

  1. English language arts
  2. Social science
  3. Science education (biology, chemistry, physics, or integrated general science)
  4. Mathematics (advanced and foundational)
  5. World languages (French, German, Japanese, Mandarin Chinese, and Spanish)

To ensure all graduates are trained to teach culturally and linguistically diverse youth, both specializations include embedded preparation for the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) endorsement.

UO Teach is a five-term, full-time program, though students may be accepted for a two-year, part-time program. The graduate program begins in June, preparing students for 34 weeks of progressive field experience in local schools, starting in the fall. It is a cohort-based program (students are taught as a community rather than as individuals) in which students explore approaches to teaching and learning that value individual student’s strengths, facilitates critical thinking, and reflect culturally responsive methods and practices of teaching that serve all learners. Study plans are based on endorsement area sequential courses.

Upon successful completion of related course work, field placement, and licensure requirements, candidates are eligible to apply for a Teacher Standards and Practices Commission Oregon teaching license. The preliminary teaching licenses and subsequent renewals and out-of-state transfers require a College of Education recommendation.

More information on the program is available at the website.

Application and Admission

The program is competitive, with limited enrollment. Admission criteria include a bachelor’s degree with required content preparation, a 3.00 grade point average (GPA), demonstrated working experience with school-age youth, passing subject-area test scores for Oregon Educator Licensure Assessments (ORELA), a commitment to working with diverse populations, and strong communication skills. See the website for application details.

Master of Science in Curriculum and Teacher Education

Core Courses
Foundations of education courses8
Teacher professionalism courses8
Research methodology courses8
Specialization Courses
Program courses16
Electives16
Total Credits56

This program is designed for those who already hold a teaching license but want to build on their knowledge by adding a master's degree. Study plans are individualized based on an applicant’s educational pursuits. The program accepts applicants on an annual basis. Interested applicants may access the application from October through January 30; the program begins summer session, in June.

Enrollment is limited. Program admission is based on grade point average, recommendations, need in the field, and the results of an interview.  See the website for application details.

Application and Admissions

Enrollment is limited. Program admission is based on grade point average, recommendations, need in the field, and the interview. See the website for application details.

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Endorsement

The add-on endorsements in ESOL and ESOL–bilingual education prepare educators to serve students who enter the public school system with a native language other than English. Another goal of these endorsement programs is to prepare teachers to view the native culture of an ESOL student as a source of pride and enrichment. Course work and field experiences develop teachers’

  • planning, delivery, and assessment of ESOL instruction
  • knowledge of effective second-language program models
  • ability to serve as a resource to content teachers to ensure successful transition of a child from a sheltered program to the mainstream program
  • ability to advocate for literacy in more than one language and for education with more than one cultural focus, resisting assimilationist approaches to ESOL education

ESOL Endorsement Requirements

Courses16
Practicum3
Total Credits19

The program for the ESOL endorsement requires satisfactory completion of 19 credits, including four courses and a practicum. As an add-on endorsement, it is only available to licensed teachers. 

Students who have completed an ESOL endorsement and are proficient in another language may add the bilingual endorsement by passing the appropriate Oregon Educator Licensure Assessments–National Evaluation Series language test. No course work is necessary for the bilingual endorsement.

Reading Endorsement Requirements

Courses24
Practicum3
Total Credits27

The reading endorsement is an option available to those who already hold an Oregon teaching license and want to become reading interventionists. The program has a multilingual-multicultural emphasis that offers a linguistically and culturally inclusive approach to literacy education, including attention to the needs of speakers of other languages and nonstandard English. Students complete six courses and a practicum for a total of 27 credits. 

Application and Admissions

Applicants must hold a teaching license. Students are admitted on a rolling basis but typically begin the program in summer or fall. For application information and deadlines, visit education.uoregon.edu/cted.

Licensure

Licensure programs of the Department of Education Studies meet the requirements for the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission for a preliminary teacher license in elementary multiple subjects and middle or high school education content areas. Endorsements are available in ESOL and ESOL-bilingual specialization and reading.

Doctor of Philosophy in Critical and Sociocultural Studies in Education

The University of Oregon doctor of philosophy degree (PhD) in critical and sociocultural studies in education (CSSE) emphasizes the development of expertise in research on curriculum, instruction, and teacher education. The program is designed to prepare candidates for work as faculty members at universities. Graduates may also pursue careers as researchers at state agencies or private research centers. The program requires disciplined study of the processes of teaching and learning as well as critical discussions about worthwhile teaching subjects. Courses of study in the program focus on

  • the development of teachers as curriculum designers, critical and creative thinkers, and scholars of their practice
  • the cognitive foundations of teaching practice
  • the social and cultural context in which teaching and teacher education takes place
  • the ideological, cultural, and philosophical foundations of educational practice
  • extensive and rigorous preparation in qualitative and/or quantitative research methods

The program requires a minimum of 135 graduate credits, at least 84 of which must be earned after admission to the program.

Admission

The program is small—fewer than 10 students are admitted every two years. The next cohort will be admitted for fall 2019. Application details are available online.

Courses

Course usage information

EDST 111. Educational Issues and Problems. 4 Credits.

Examines specific issues and problems confronting educators. Compares and contrasts different approaches to the ways in which society defines and deals with educational issues and problems.

Course usage information

EDST 196. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDST 198. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDST 199. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. A recent topic is Exploring Educational Studies.

Course usage information

EDST 220. Beginning Applications in Educational Technology. 4 Credits.

Development of skills and exploration of computer applications useful for communicating in an educational setting.

Course usage information

EDST 225. School and Representation in Film. 4 Credits.

Examines popular culture’s influence on schools and teachers along with the various mediating factors such as race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexuality, religion, and nationality.

Course usage information

EDST 231. Teaching in the 21st Century. 4 Credits.

Exploration of who teachers are and what teachers do in urban, suburban, and rural school settings.

Course usage information

EDST 331. Autobiography of Schooling. 4 Credits.

Through critical autobiographies, case studies, readings and application activities, students examine and reflect on life in classrooms.

Course usage information

EDST 332. Learning, Teaching, and Assessment I. 3 Credits.

Students move beyond their own critical autobiographies of life in classrooms into various disciplinary literatures on learning, teaching, and assessment.
Prereq: EDST 331; coreq: EDST 338.

Course usage information

EDST 333. Learning, Teaching, and Assessment II. 3 Credits.

Focus on specific school subjects that provide a context for examining the basic assumptions underlying teaching, learning, and assessment.
Prereq: EDST 332; coreq: EDST 339.

Course usage information

EDST 338. Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment I. 1 Credit.

Students focus on listening to children to better understand how they make sense of school subjects.
Pre- or coreq: EDST 332.

Course usage information

EDST 339. Observation: Learning, Teaching, Assessment II. 1 Credit.

Focuses on developing skills in observation of learning, teaching, and assessments.
Coreq: EDST 333.

Course usage information

EDST 342. Curriculum Studies I. 4 Credits.

Examines basic assumptions underlying curriculum in specific subject areas.

Course usage information

EDST 343. Curriculum Studies II. 4 Credits.

Examines basic assumptions underlying curriculum development in K-12 schools.
Prereq: EDST 342.

Course usage information

EDST 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Exploring Educational Studies, IDEA Reading.

Course usage information

EDST 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-18 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDST 402. Supervised College Teaching. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDST 404. Internship: [Topic]. 1-18 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDST 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-18 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDST 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Educational Foundations.

Course usage information

EDST 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Professional Practices, Education for Minority Students, Reading in the Upper Elementary Grades.

Course usage information

EDST 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDST 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-18 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Integrated Licensure I, II, III.

Course usage information

EDST 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Foundations of Education, Science and Health Methods, Social Studies and Language Arts Methods.

Course usage information

EDST 411. Childhood Studies. 3 Credits.

Examines child development from within the context of specific development and ecological theories.

Course usage information

EDST 420. Living in a Stratified Society. 4 Credits.

Examines the stratification of wealth, status, and opportunity for advancement in our society.

Course usage information

EDST 422. Technology Education. 4 Credits.

Examines educational technology, including the theoretical, methodological, practical, and policy issues that influence the field.
Prereq: EDST 220.

Course usage information

EDST 440. Physical Education for Diverse Learners. 3 Credits.

Provides a variety of physical education and fitness activities appropriate for children with diverse abilities.

Course usage information

EDST 451. Equal Opportunity: Ecojustice and Education. 3 Credits.

Examines ways that schools, implicitly and explicitly, teach about the environment and human relationships to the environment.
Prereq: EDST 420; coreq: EDST 458.

Course usage information

EDST 452. Equal Opportunity: Poverty. 3 Credits.

Examines the way poverty structures and mediates educational experiences and influences the educational achievement of students.
Prereq: EDST 420.

Course usage information

EDST 453. Equal Opportunity: Racism. 3 Credits.

Examines the historical development of the concept of race and its role in legitimizing colonization, genocide, and extreme maldistributions of wealth.
Prereq: EDST 420.

Course usage information

EDST 454. Equal Opportunity: Patriarchy. 3 Credits.

Examines the way gender affects educational experiences and influences the educational achievement of students.
Prereq: EDST 420.

Course usage information

EDST 455. Equal Opportunity: Homophobia. 3 Credits.

Examines the way sexuality and sexual identity influence the educational experiences of students.
Prereq: EDST 420. Coreq: EDST 458.

Course usage information

EDST 456. Equal Opportunity: Colonization and Genocide. 3 Credits.

Examines educational institutions and their continuing part in larger social processes of colonization and cultural genocide.
Prereq: EDST 420.

Course usage information

EDST 457. Equal Opportunity: Diaspora and Immigration. 3 Credits.

Examines the way educational institutions have responded to human migration generally and to immigrant students specifically.
Prereq: EDST 420

Course usage information

EDST 458. Observation: Equal Opportunity I. 1 Credit.

Engages students in the analysis of specific dimensions of educational opportunity in the field. Repeatable twice for a maximum of 3 credits.
Prereq: EDST 420; coreq: one from EDST 451, 452, 453, 454, 455, 456, 457.

Course usage information

EDST 463. Foundations of Reading. 4 Credits.

Introduction to the various theoretical dimensions of reading and writing that form the foundation for understanding and teaching the complex texts children encounter today.

Course usage information

EDST 464. Multicultural Literacy. 4 Credits.

Introduces preservice teachers to literature written from ethnic, linguistic, social, and cultural perspectives and draws connections to broader cultural, social, historical, economic, and political contexts.

Course usage information

EDST 471. Foundations of Algebra Learning. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the principles underlying the teaching and learning of algebra. Sequence with EDST 472.

Course usage information

EDST 472. Foundations of Geometry Learning. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the principles underlying the teaching and learning of geometry. Sequence with EDST 471.
Prereq: EDST 471.

Course usage information

EDST 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Professional Practices, Education for Minority Students, Reading in the Upper Elementary Grades.

Course usage information

EDST 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

EDST 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Foundations of Education, Science and Health Methods, Social Studies and Language Arts Methods.

Course usage information

EDST 522. Technology Education. 4 Credits.

Examines educational technology, including the theoretical, methodological, practical, and policy issues that influence the field.

Course usage information

EDST 551. Equal Opportunity: Ecojustice and Education. 3 Credits.

Examines ways that schools, implicitly and explicitly, teach about the environment and human relationships to the environment.
Coreq: EDST 558.

Course usage information

EDST 552. Equal Opportunity: Poverty. 3 Credits.

Examines the way poverty structures and mediates educational experiences and influences the educational achievement of students.

Course usage information

EDST 553. Equal Opportunity: Racism. 3 Credits.

Examines the historical development of the concept of race and its role in legitimizing colonization, genocide, and extreme maldistributions of wealth.

Course usage information

EDST 554. Equal Opportunity: Patriarchy. 3 Credits.

Examines the way gender affects educational experiences and influences the educational achievement of students.

Course usage information

EDST 555. Equal Opportunity: Homophobia. 3 Credits.

Examines the way sexuality and sexual identity influence the educational experiences of students.

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EDST 556. Equal Opportunity: Colonization and Genocide. 3 Credits.

Examines educational institutions and their continuing part in larger social processes of colonization and cultural genocide.

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EDST 557. Equal Opportunity: Diaspora and Immigration. 3 Credits.

Examines the way educational institutions have responded to human migration generally and to immigrant students specifically.

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EDST 558. Observation: Equal Opportunity I. 1 Credit.

Engages students in the analysis of specific dimensions of educational opportunity in the field.

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EDST 571. Foundations of Algebra Learning. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the principles underlying the teaching and learning of algebra. Sequence with EDST 572.

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EDST 572. Foundations of Geometry Learning. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the principles underlying the teaching and learning of geometry. Sequence with EDST 571.
Prereq: EDST 571.

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EDST 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 605. Reading & Conference: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 610. Experimental Course. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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EDST 611. The Scholarship of Teaching. 4 Credits.

Examines the recent emergence of a focus on teachers as reflective practitioners, inquirers, action researchers, and scholars of pedagogical understanding.

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EDST 612. Foundations of Teaching and Learning. 3 Credits.

Provides students with the psychological foundations of teaching and learning.

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EDST 614. Cultural Context of Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the cultural foundations of educational practice through a critical review of four decades of ethnographic research on school and student culture.

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EDST 615. Technology and Education. 4 Credits.

Introduction to major contemporary issues affecting education in the digital age.

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EDST 616. Language, Power, and Education. 4 Credits.

Examines the politics, policies, and practical realities associated with language and literacy in educational settings and how these issues affect all students to some degree.

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EDST 618. Teaching English Language Development, K–12. 3 Credits.

Examines best practices of delivering English-language development in light of federal and state standards, including teaching methods, technology, and parental involvement.

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EDST 619. Teaching for Literacy. 4 Credits.

Prepares middle and high school teachers who are expected to teach specific content areas and literacy strategies as part of a reading endorsement. Offered as needed.

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EDST 620. Evolution and the Math Wars. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the debates that influence, and in some cases overshadow, the teaching of mathematics and science from kindergarten to grade 12. Sequence with EDST 621, 622 (or 623, 624); 625, 626.

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EDST 621. Representing Mathematical Concepts. 4 Credits.

Students deepen their content knowledge, widen their understanding of student conceptualizations of mathematics, and reflect on their own mathematics instructional practices. Sequence with EDST 620, 622, 625, 626.

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EDST 622. Mathematical Problem-Solving Curriculum. 4 Credits.

Prepares students to view mathematics as a problem-solving field rather than a set of discrete skills and operational rules. Sequence with EDST 620, 621, 625, 626.
Prereq: EDST 621.

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EDST 623. Representing Science Concepts. 4 Credits.

Examines why science is taught, what science subjects need to be taught, and how science is learned. Sequence with EDST 620, 624, 625, 626.

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EDST 624. Scientific Problem-Solving Curriculum. 4 Credits.

Presents science as a problem-solving field rather than a set of discrete facts and concepts. Introduces scientific literacy as the aim of science teaching. Sequence with EDST 620, 623, 625, 626.
Prereq: EDST 623.

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EDST 627. Introduction to Supportive Learning Communities. 1 Credit.

Introduces the teacher candidate to the necessary components for creating supportive and successful classroom communities, including interaction between motivation, “classroom management,” and teacher-student relationships. Sequence with EDST 628.

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EDST 628. Creating Supportive Classroom Communities. 3 Credits.

Builds on EDST 627 by providing specific research, experience, and strategies for developing classroom environments where student behaviors are focused on learning. Sequence with EDST 627.
Prereq: EDST 627.

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EDST 630. Humanities Curriculum and Cultural Conflict. 4 Credits.

Examines the epistemology and conceptions of education that underlie the humanities curriculum at the secondary level. Sequence with EDST 631, 632 (or 633, 634 or 635, 636); 637; 638.

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EDST 631. Representing Literature to Young People. 4 Credits.

Examines why literature is taught and the way teachers represent literary works to students. Sequence with EDST 630, 632, 637, 638.

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EDST 632. Engaging Students in Writing. 4 Credits.

Overview of strategies and tools for engaging students in the writing process. Emphasis on genres of writing and use of technology to enhance student writing. Sequence with EDST 630, 631, 637, 638.
Prereq: EDST 631.

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EDST 633. Representing Second-Language Concepts. 4 Credits.

Provides a research-based foundation for planning, teaching, assessing, and managing second-language learning for the great diversity of students encountered in middle and high school. Sequence with EDST 630, 634, 637, 638.

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EDST 634. Second-Language Conversation and Composition. 4 Credits.

Advanced teaching methodologies, techniques, and skills to effectively promote proficiency and fluency in second languages. Sequence with EDST 630, 633, 637, 638.
Prereq: EDST 633.

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EDST 635. Representing Social Studies Concepts. 4 Credits.

Examines why social studies is taught and the way teachers represent social studies concepts to students. Sequence with EDST 630, 636, 637, 638.

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EDST 636. Social Studies Inquiry and Analysis. 4 Credits.

Explores the theory and practice of teaching social studies as a specialized form of inquiry. Sequence with EDST 630, 635, 637, 638.
Prereq: EDST 635.

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EDST 638. English Language Learners Pedagogy for Humanities. 4 Credits.

Examines a variety of research-based instructional and assessment strategies that support English language learners in meeting the curricular mandates of mainstream language arts and social studies courses. Sequence with EDST 630; 631, 632 (or 633, 634 or 635, 636); 637.

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EDST 640. Constructing Meaning through Literacy. 4 Credits.

Provides concepts and strategies used in teaching children to read. Focuses in particular on instruction for beginning and intermediate readers and writers. Sequence with EDST 641.

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EDST 641. Developing Thoughtful Literary Practices. 4 Credits.

Examines the teaching of reading as a practice filled with cultural meaning, placing reading education in its wider social and cultural context.

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EDST 642. Pedagogical Methods in the Humanities. 4 Credits.

Explores the application of language arts and social studies methods and strategies for future elementary school practitioners.

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EDST 643. Teaching Mathematics: Facts and Inquiry. 4 Credits.

Focuses on four areas of instruction crucial to becoming a skillful beginning teacher of mathematics. Sequence with EDST 644.

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EDST 644. Teaching Mathematics: Inquiry in Context. 4 Credits.

Investigates techniques and strategies used to effectively teach mathematics and assess students. Sequence with EDST 643.
Prereq: EDST 643.

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EDST 645. Teaching Science: Detail and Discovery. 4 Credits.

Emphasizes science as a process of contemplating, exploring, and raising questions about the world in elementary classrooms.

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EDST 646. English Language Learners Pedagogy for Elementary Classrooms. 4 Credits.

Examines a variety of research-based instructional and assessment strategies that support English language learners in meeting the mandates of elementary-level curriculum.

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EDST 650. Teacher Education: Policy and Practice. 4 Credits.

Explores the work of contemporary scholars who are attempting to bridge the division between policy and practice in teacher education. Offered alternate years.

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EDST 652. Teacher Education: Analyzing Foundational Concepts. 4 Credits.

Examines foundational concepts that shape research and practice in teacher education. Offered alternate years.

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EDST 654. Learning and Motivational Sciences. 4 Credits.

Survey of the learning and motivational sciences for advanced graduate students. Offered alternate years.

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EDST 660. Urban Schools: History and Politics. 4 Credits.

Examines the historical, economic, political, legal, and social context of contemporary urban schooling systems. Offered alternate years.

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EDST 661. Sociology: From Reproduction to Resistance. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the ways schools reproduce, reinforce, and challenge prevailing social, economic, and political relationships. Offered alternate years.

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EDST 662. Curriculum Theory: Contesting Educational Content. 4 Credits.

Survey of the history of curriculum theory, the subfield that asks the fundamental question, what is worth teaching? Offered alternate years.

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EDST 663. Education and Immigration. 4 Credits.

Examines the way educational institutions have responded to human migration generally and to immigrant students, with an emphasis onbilingual education policy. Offered alternate years.

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EDST 666. Thesis Writing. 4 Credits.

Seminar for doctoral students who have advanced to candidacy. Emphasis is on support through the dissertation proposal writing process. Repeatable as needed.

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EDST 667. Grant Writing: Finding Funders. 4 Credits.

Provides graduate students with the knowledge and skills needed to write successful grant proposals for research, professional development, and curriculum development projects.

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EDST 670. Philosophy of Research. 4 Credits.

Examines the philosophical assumptions that underlie various research methodologies in the human and social sciences.

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EDST 673. Advanced Qualitative Methodology: Arts-Based Approaches. 4 Credits.

Examines contemporary reflexive social science research writing, focusing on experimentations with the form used by researchers to communicate insights about human affairs.
Pre- or coreq: EDUC 630, EDUC 632, EDUC 634.