Special Education and Clinical Sciences

http://education.uoregon.edu/specs

Laura Lee McIntyre, Department Head
541-346-9148
541-346-0683 fax
340 HEDCO Education Building

Through teaching, research, and service, the Department of Special Education and Clinical Sciences seeks to improve the quality of education, employment, and community living for children and adults with special needs and their families. The department has three graduate majors: communication disorders and sciences, school psychology, and special education. The department also offers an undergraduate degree in communication disorders and sciences as well as a minor in special education.

Faculty

Linda Albi, clinical assistant professor (personnel preparation, supervision). BA, 1995, MS, 1997, Oregon. (1998)

Richard W. Albin, senior research associate with title of associate professor (research design, programming and instruction, instructional technology). BA, 1969, Rochester; MA, 1973, Illinois; PhD, 1986, Oregon. (1986)

Franklin Bender, clinical assistant professor; clinical supervisor. BS, 1993, MS, 1996, Portland State; MS, 2014, Oregon. (2015)

Susan Boettcher, associate clinical professor; clinical supervisor. BS, 1988, Montana State; MS, 1995, West Virginia. (1999)

Ben Clarke, associate professor (math assessment and intervention; school psychology). BS, 1997, Wabash; MA, 2001, PhD, 2002, Oregon (2016).

Jantina Clifford, senior lecturer (developmental screening, instrumental development, personnel preparation). BA, 1985, MA, 1988, MS, 1999, PhD, 2006, Oregon. (2006)

Lauren Cycyk, assistant professor (early language development, Spanish-English dual language development, caregiver-influenced language development). BA, 2004, George Washington; MS, 2007, Arizona State; PhD, year unknown, Temple. (2016)

Stephanie De Anda, acting assistant professor (early language acquisition, bilingualism, language intervention). BS, 2011, California, San Diego. (2017)

Lillian Duran, associate professor. BA, 1995, Antioch College; MA, 1999, George Washington; PhD, 2008, Minnesota, Twin Cities. (2015)

Jessica L. Fanning, associate clinical professor; clinic supervisor. BA, 1989, MA, 1996, Colorado, Boulder; PhD, 2007, Oregon. (2010)

Hank Fien, associate professor (academic intervention and prevention, instructional design, research design). BA, 1992, Glassboro State College; MS, 2002, PhD, 2004, Oregon. (2015)

K. Brigid Flannery, senior research associate with title of associate professor (teacher training, transition issues). BA, 1975, Marian; MEd, 1978, Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; PhD, 1992, Oregon. (1989)

Jeanine Geisler, clinical assistant professor; clinical supervisor. BS, 2007, MS, 2009, Indiana University of Pennsylvania. (2015)

Nicole R. Giuliani, assistant professor (cognitive and affective science, translational neuroscience, obesity prevention), BA, 2003, Pennsylvania; PhD, 2011, Stanford (2016).

Roland H. Good III, associate professor (psychoeducational assessment, multivariate statistics). BS, 1977, MS, 1981, PhD, 1985, Pennsylvania State. (1988)

Beth Harn, associate professor (learning disabilities, assessment, instructional design). BA, 1991, MS, 1994, California State, Fresno; PhD, 2000, Oregon. (2006)

Lisa Hellemn, lecturer (teacher training, supervision); practicum coordinator. BMusEd, 1986, Willamette; PhD, 1991, Oregon. (1993)

Kathleen Jungjohann, senior instructor (teacher training, supervision, instructional design). BA, 1972, California, Santa Barbara; MA, 1980, Oregon. (1988)

Edward J. Kame’enui, professor (learning disabilities, instructional design). BA, 1970, Pacific; MS, 1977, PhD, 1980, Oregon. (1988)

Johanna Larson, Mitchell Child-Directed Speech Sign Language Professor; instructor (American Sign Language). BA, 1984, California State, Northridge; MS 2004, Idaho State. (1999)

Sylvia Linan-Thompson, associate professor (learning disabilities, English learners, literacy). BS, 1988, Texas, Austin. MS, 1992, Miami. PhD, 1999, Texas, Austin. (2015)

Wendy Machalicek, associate professor (low-incidence disabilities, autism, early intervention). BS, 2000, North Texas; MEd, 2004, PhD, 2008, Texas, Austin. (2011)

Katie Mason, instructor; clinic supervisor (speech-language pathology). BA, 2003, MS, 2005, Oregon. (2012)

Kent McIntosh, professor (behavior management, research design, applied behavior analysis); director, educational and community supports. BA, 1997, Duke; MS, 2003, PhD, 2005, Oregon. (2012)

Laura Lee McIntyre, professor (developmental disabilities, early intervention, home-school collaboration). BA, 1997, La Sierra; MA, 2000, PhD, 2003, California, Riverside. (2009)

Karen McLaughlin, senior lecturer (anatomy and physiology, aphasia, family advocacy). BA, 1991, Colorado, Boulder; MA, 1996, PhD, 2001, Oregon. (2000)

Jennifer Meyer, associate clinical professor; director, clinic education. BS, 2000, MS, 2002, Southern Illinois. (2010)

Heather Moore, senior lecturer; clinical supervisor. BS, 1992, James Madison; MA, 1997, Georgia; PhD, 2005, Arizona State. (2007)

Christopher J. Murray, professor (secondary special education and transition). BA, 1989, University of Maryland, College Park; MEd, 1992, Howard; PhD, 1998, Washington (Seattle). (2006)

Marilyn A. Nippold, professor (language development and disorders in school-age children and adolescents). BA, 1972, California, Los Angeles; MA, 1976, California State, Long Beach; PhD, 1982, Purdue. (1982)

Elise Peltier, clinical assistant professor; clinic supervisor. BA, 1998, Oregon; MS, 2008, Northern Arizona. (2012)

John R. Seeley, professor (emotional and behavioral disorders). BS, 1985, MS, 1991, PhD, 2001, Oregon. (2015)  

Stephanie Shire, assistant professor (early intervention, autism spectrum disorders, community-based intervention). BA, 2008, MEd, 2010, Alberta; MA, 2013, PhD, 2013, California, Los Angeles. (2017)

Samantha Shune, assistant professor. (dysphagia, aging). BA, 2005, Michigan, Ann Arbor; MA, 2007, Ohio State; PhD, 2014, Iowa. (2014)

McKay Moore Sohlberg, HEDCO Professor in Communication Disorders and Sciences (cognitive rehabilitation, traumatic brain injury). BA, 1982, Stanford; MS, 1984, PhD, 1990, Washington (Seattle). (1995)

Jane Squires, senior research associate with title of professor (infant development, program evaluation, assessment). BA, 1971, Stanford; MA, 1973, Saint Mary’s; PhD, 1988, Oregon. (1988)

Deanne Unruh, research associate (secondary special education and transition, high-risk adolescents, program evaluation). BS, 1985, MS, 1991, Kansas; PhD, 2001, Oregon. (2001)

Valentino Vasquez, instructor (American Sign Language). BA, 1997, MA, 1998, Northern Colorado. (2011)

Angela J. Whalen, clinical associate professor (professional practices in school psychology, clinical supervision, educational assessment and intervention). BA, 1996, St. Thomas; PhD, 2002, Oregon. (2003)

Courtesy

Mallory A. Brown, courtesy research associate (school psychology). BA, 2009, Arizona State; MS, 2013, PhD, 2014, Oregon. (2015)

Matthew H. Kim, courtesy research associate (school psychology, developmental psychology). BA, 2008, New York; MS, 2013, PhD, 2015, Michigan. (2015)

Emeriti

Barbara D. Bateman, professor emerita. BS, 1954, Washington (Seattle); MA, 1958, San Francisco State; PhD, 1962, Illinois; JD, 1976, Oregon. (1966)

Diane D. Bricker, professor emerita. BA, 1959, Ohio State; MS, 1965, Oregon; PhD, 1970, George Peabody. (1978)

Ned J. Christensen, professor emeritus. BA, 1954, MA, 1955, Brigham Young; PhD, 1959, Pennsylvania State. (1962)

Russell M. Gersten, professor emeritus. BA, 1967, Brandeis; PhD, 1978, Oregon. (1977)

Elizabeth G. Glover, assistant professor emerita. BS, 1959, Tufts; MS, 1963, EdD, 1974, North Carolina, Greensboro. (1964)

Robert H. Horner, professor emeritus. BA, 1971, Stanford; MS, 1975, Washington State; PhD, 1978, Oregon. (1976)

Richard J. Rankin, professor emeritus. BA, 1953, MA, 1954, PhD, 1957, California, Berkeley. (1966)

Kenneth Viegas, associate professor emeritus. BS, 1956, Oregon; MSW, 1963, California, Berkeley. (1967)

Hill M. Walker, professor emeritus. BA, 1962, Eastern Oregon; MA, 1964, PhD, 1967, Oregon. (1966)

Ruth Waugh, professor emerita. BS, 1957, Southern Oregon State; MS, 1963, PhD, 1971, Oregon. (1963)

The date in parentheses at the end of each entry is the first year on the University of Oregon faculty.

Participating

Gerald Tindal, educational methodology, policy, and leadership

Communication Disorders and Sciences Major

Karen McLaughlin, Director, Undergraduate Studies
541-346-2480
kdurany@uoregon.edu

The undergraduate program for communication disorders and sciences includes courses in basic processes of speech, language, and hearing as well as courses that survey speech, language, and hearing disorders that affect communication across the life span. The undergraduate program prepares students for graduate training in speech pathology or audiology. It also prepares students to work in other fields where knowledge of speech, language, and communication is important, such as early intervention and special education.

Students may earn a bachelor of science (BS) or bachelor of arts (BA) degree with a major in communication disorders and sciences. Both degrees require 60 credits in communication disorders and sciences and related courses and 16 credits in required science and statistics courses. Students must earn a C– or better or P in required courses.

Course work in the major focuses on acquiring knowledge in the following areas:

  • anatomical-physiological bases of speech, language, and hearing
  • acoustic properties of sound and speech production
  • role of biology, cognition, environment, and culture in language acquisition
  • development of speech and language
  • speech, language, and hearing disorders across the life span
  • assessment and treatment procedures for individuals with speech, language, and hearing disorders
  • professional issues in speech-language-pathology and audiology

The following program plans contain specific, required major courses in addition to sample courses a student may select to meet other major and university requirements.

Bachelor of Art Requirements

LING 150Structure of English Words4
CDS 201Communication Disorders in Society and Media4
ASL 3113
CDS 430Speech Pathology-Audiology as Professions2
CDS 431Beginning Clinical Methods3
CDS 442Anatomy and Physiology of Speech Mechanism4
CDS 443Acoustics of Speech4
CDS 444Clinical Phonetics and Phonology4
CDS 450Introduction to Language Development4
EDLD 450Data and Information Retrieval1
CDS 451Later Language Development4
CDS 455Child and Adolescent Development4
CDS 457Fundamentals of Audiology4
CDS 458Audiology Disorders and Treatment4
CDS 460Developmental Disorders in Communication4
CDS 462Acquired Disorders of Communication4
CDS 470Neuroscience of Speech and Language4
Social-behavioral science course4
Biological science course4
Physical science course4
Statistics course4
Total Credits77

Program Plan

First and Second Years
LING 150Structure of English Words 14
CDS 201Communication Disorders in Society and Media 14
CDS 430Speech Pathology-Audiology as Professions2
EDLD 450Data and Information Retrieval 11
Science courses12
Statistics course4
Total Credits27
Third YearCredits
CDS 442Anatomy and Physiology of Speech Mechanism 14
CDS 443Acoustics of Speech 4
CDS 444Clinical Phonetics and Phonology 4
CDS 450Introduction to Language Development 4
CDS 455Child and Adolescent Development 4
CDS 457Fundamentals of Audiology 4
Fourth Year
ASL 311  3
CDS 431Beginning Clinical Methods 3
CDS 451Later Language Development 4
CDS 458Audiology Disorders and Treatment 4
CDS 460Developmental Disorders in Communication 4
CDS 462Acquired Disorders of Communication 4
CDS 470Neuroscience of Speech and Language 4
 Total Credits: 50

Bachelor of Science Requirements

LING 150Structure of English Words4
CDS 201Communication Disorders in Society and Media4
ASL 3113
CDS 430Speech Pathology-Audiology as Professions2
CDS 431Beginning Clinical Methods3
CDS 442Anatomy and Physiology of Speech Mechanism4
CDS 443Acoustics of Speech4
CDS 444Clinical Phonetics and Phonology4
CDS 450Introduction to Language Development4
EDLD 450Data and Information Retrieval1
CDS 451Later Language Development4
CDS 455Child and Adolescent Development4
CDS 457Fundamentals of Audiology4
CDS 458Audiology Disorders and Treatment4
CDS 460Developmental Disorders in Communication4
CDS 462Acquired Disorders of Communication4
CDS 470Neuroscience of Speech and Language4
Social-behavioral science course4
Biological science course4
Physical science course4
Statistics course4
Total Credits77

Program Plan

First and Second Years
LING 150Structure of English Words 14
CDS 201Communication Disorders in Society and Media 14
CDS 430Speech Pathology-Audiology as Professions2
EDLD 450Data and Information Retrieval 11
Science courses12
Statistics course4
Total Credits27
Third YearCredits
CDS 442Anatomy and Physiology of Speech Mechanism 14
CDS 443Acoustics of Speech 4
CDS 444Clinical Phonetics and Phonology 4
CDS 450Introduction to Language Development 4
CDS 455Child and Adolescent Development 4
CDS 457Fundamentals of Audiology 4
Fourth Year
ASL 311  3
CDS 431Beginning Clinical Methods 3
CDS 451Later Language Development 4
CDS 458Audiology Disorders and Treatment 4
CDS 460Developmental Disorders in Communication 4
CDS 462Acquired Disorders of Communication 4
CDS 470Neuroscience of Speech and Language 4
 Total Credits: 50

Students must meet with the department’s undergraduate advisor to develop an academic program plan and ensure that general university requirements and communication disorders and sciences prerequisites are met. Beginning fall term of their junior year, students must follow the program plan of courses in their prescribed sequence. Students who fail to do so will likely delay their graduation date.

Special Education Minor

Elisa Jamgochian, Coordinator
340 HEDCO Education Building
ejamgoch@uoregon.edu
541-346-5185

The minor in special education is for students who plan to pursue a career teaching in general or special education, are interested in working in nonschool settings with individuals who have disabilities, or want to study issues concerning people with special needs. The minor consists of a core of required course work and electives. Some of these credits can be applied toward meeting the requirements for an Oregon special educator teaching license.

The requirements for the minor consist of 7 core credits and 17 elective credits. Electives provide students with a breadth of interdisciplinary options. Students may plan a course of study that introduces them to the field of special education and prepares them to begin a licensure program, focusing on classroom settings and specific instructional skills and strategies for teaching students with disabilities. Other major course work such as English, comparative literature, law, journalism, architecture, arts administration, business, or planning, public policy and management may be augmented by completing minor course work focused on broad issues concerning people with disabilities. The option provides an enhanced understanding of perspectives on disability and issues in each student's chosen profession.

Minor Requirements

Required course credits7
Electives 117
Total Credits24
1

Elective credits will depend on the option chosen.

Application and Admission

Before applying to the minor program, students must complete at least 1 credit of Field Studies: [Topic] (SPED 406) (or have a Petition to Waiver form on file with the minor coordinator), Seminar: [Topic] (SPED 407), and Foundations of Disability I (SPED 411) with a minimum grade of B– or P. Students apply to the department and are assigned a minor advisor, who helps plan a course of study. Applications are available online.

Certificate in Special Education

Elisa Jamgochian, Program Coordinator
340 HEDCO Education Building
ejamgoch@uoregon.edu
541-346-5185

The department offers a certificate in special education for students who are interested in a career in public education, human services and social work, or a related field. This certificate is designed to provide foundational knowledge about the field of special education and would benefit students interested in a career in supporting students with disabilities in public school, agency, or community settings. The certificate has an emphasis on developing skills and knowledge in three areas: foundations of disability, instructional methods for students with disabilities, and behavioral and social emotional supports for students with disabilities.

The certificate is available to all students interested in working with students and families with disabilities but does not replace formal teacher licensure programs that are available through graduate study at the University of Oregon. Completion of the certificate will, however, waive some of the prerequisites for students who enter the graduate special education program, providing certificate recipients an option for an accelerated pathway to licensure in special education and a master's degree.

The certificate requires 31 400-level course credits (which includes an American Sign Language requirement).

Courses must be taken for a letter grade unless only offered pass/no pass. Graded courses must be passed with a grade of B– or better so that students are sufficiently prepared to be successful in completing the required practicum experience. If a student receives a grade lower than a B–, the certificate advisor and clinical supervisor will meet to determine if the student has the skills and knowledge to complete the required practicum experience, Practicum: [Topic] (SPED 409).

Students completing this certificate cannot also obtain the minor in special education.

Admissions and Application

Before applying to the certificate program, students must complete at least 1 credit of Field Studies: [Topic] (SPED 406) (or have a Petition to Waiver form on file with the minor coordinator), Seminar: [Topic] (SPED 407), and Foundations of Disability I (SPED 411) with a minimum grade of B– or P.

Applications are available online. Students are asked to submit a professional goal statement and two letters of recommendation along with their application. An initial interview and advising meeting with the program coordinator is also required. Admitted students must have a signed program plan and a copy of their College of Education ID badge on file with the coordinator.

Four-Year Degree Plan

The degree plan shown is only a sample of how students may complete their degrees in four years. There are alternative ways. Students should consult their advisor to determine the best path for them.

Bachelor of Arts in Communication Disorders and Sciences

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
BI 121 Introduction to Human Physiology BI 121 is a suggestion; one course must be taken freshman year that fulfills the biological science requirement. Courses that satisfy this requirement include biology, human physiology, neuroanatomy, and genetics. Biology courses must have an animal focus. 4
WR 121 College Composition I 4
First term of first-year second-language sequence 5
Elective course 4
 Credits 17
Winter
MATH 243 Introduction to Methods of Probability and Statistics 4
PHYS 152 Physics of Sound and Music PHYS 152 is a suggestion; one course must be taken freshman or sophomore year that fulfills the physical science requirement. Courses that satisfy this requirement include chemistry or physics. 4
WR 122 College Composition II 4
Second term of first-year second-language sequence 5
 Credits 17
Spring
PHYS 202 General Physics PSY 202 is a suggestion; courses in psychology, sociology, public health, or social-cultural anthropology fulfill the social-behavioral science requirement.4
Third term of first-year second-language sequence 5
General education course in arts and letters 4
General education course in science 4
 Credits 17
 Total Credits 51
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
CDS 201 Communication Disorders in Society and Media Course required for majors; satisfies identity, pluralism, and tolerance multicultural requirement4
LING 150 Structure of English Words LING 150 is a recommended prerequisite for sophomore year; satisfies general-education requirement in arts and letters4
First term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
 Credits 16
Winter
Second term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education courses in arts and letters 8
 Credits 16
Spring
CDS 430 Speech Pathology-Audiology as Professions 2
Third term of second-year second-language sequence 4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 14
 Total Credits 46
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
EDLD 450 Data and Information Retrieval 1
CDS 442 Anatomy and Physiology of Speech Mechanism 4
CDS 450 Introduction to Language Development 4
General-education course in social science 4
 Credits 13
Winter
CDS 455 Child and Adolescent Development 4
CDS 443 Acoustics of Speech 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
Spring
CDS 444 Clinical Phonetics and Phonology 4
CDS 457 Fundamentals of Audiology 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 45
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
CDS 446 Services for Deaf Students 3
CDS 458 Audiology Disorders and Treatment 4
CDS 460 Developmental Disorders in Communication 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 15
Winter
CDS 451 Later Language Development 4
CDS 470 Neuroscience of Speech and Language 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
Spring
CDS 431 Beginning Clinical Methods 3
CDS 462 Acquired Disorders of Communication 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 15
 Total Credits 46

Bachelor of Science in Communication Disorders and Sciences

Degree Map
First Year
FallMilestonesCredits
WR 121 College Composition I 4
MATH 105 University Mathematics I MATH 105 is a suggestion; math courses should be selected based on placement test scores and student interest.4
BI 121 Introduction to Human Physiology BI 121 is just a suggestion; one course must be taken freshman year that fulfills the biological science requirement. Courses that satisfy this requirement include biology, human physiology, neuroanatomy, and genetics; biology courses must have an animal focus. 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 16
Winter
WR 122 College Composition II 4
MATH 111 College Algebra 4
General-education course in science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
 Credits 16
Spring
PSY 202 Mind and Society PSY 202 is a suggestion; courses in psychology, sociology, public health, or social or cultural anthropology fulfill the social-behavioral science requirement4
PHYS 152 Physics of Sound and Music PHYS 152 is a suggestion; one course must be taken freshman or sophomore year that fulfills the physical science requirement. Courses that satisfy this requirement include chemistry or physics4
MATH 243 Introduction to Methods of Probability and Statistics 4
General-education course that also satisfies a multicultural requirement 4
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 48
Degree Map
Second Year
FallMilestonesCredits
CDS 201 Communication Disorders in Society and Media Course required for majors; satisfies identity, pluralism, and tolerance multicultural requirement.4
LING 150 Structure of English Words LING 150 is a recommended prerequisite for sophomore year; satisfies general-education arts and letters requirement4
General-education course in social science 4
General-education course in science 4
 Credits 16
Winter
General-education course in science 4
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
Spring
CDS 430 Speech Pathology-Audiology as Professions 2
General-education course in arts and letters 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 14
 Total Credits 46
Degree Map
Third Year
FallMilestonesCredits
EDLD 450 Data and Information Retrieval 1
CDS 442 Anatomy and Physiology of Speech Mechanism 4
CDS 450 Introduction to Language Development 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 13
Winter
CDS 455 Child and Adolescent Development 4
CDS 443 Acoustics of Speech 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
Spring
CDS 444 Clinical Phonetics and Phonology 4
CDS 457 Fundamentals of Audiology 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
 Total Credits 45
Degree Map
Fourth Year
FallMilestonesCredits
CDS 446 Services for Deaf Students 3
CDS 458 Audiology Disorders and Treatment 4
CDS 460 Developmental Disorders in Communication 4
Elective course 4
 Credits 15
Winter
CDS 451 Later Language Development 4
CDS 470 Neuroscience of Speech and Language 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 16
Spring
CDS 431 Beginning Clinical Methods 3
CDS 462 Acquired Disorders of Communication 4
Elective courses 8
 Credits 15
 Total Credits 46

Communication Disorders and Sciences

McKay Moore Sohlberg, Program Director
541-346-2586
541-346-6778 fax
HEDCO Education Building, Second Floor
cds@uoregon.edu
education.uoregon.edu/CDS

The graduate program offers master’s and doctoral degrees in communication disorders and sciences. The master’s program offers all of the courses and clinical experiences required for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Certificate of Clinical Competence. The program also offers course work and clinical experiences required to obtain an Oregon teaching license to work in the public schools. The doctoral program emphasizes advanced scholarship in a specialized area of speech-language pathology.

Accreditation

The master’s degree program in speech-language pathology is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

Master’s Degree

McKay Moore Sohlberg, Program Director
541-346-2586
541-346-6778 fax
HEDCO Education Building, Second Floor

The master’s degree program provides students with the opportunity to acquire and apply knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary for work with individuals of all ages and of varying social, cultural, linguistic, and economic backgrounds who have cognitive communication and/or swallowing disorders.

The communication disorders and sciences degree leads to a master of arts (MA) or master of science (MS) degree. A planned program for the master’s degree must be filed with the department secretary.

Students who have fulfilled the undergraduate prerequisites typically spend two fall-through-spring academic years and one summer session completing the degree as a full-time student. Every student completes an evidence-based practice project, equivalent to a master’s thesis, that integrates research and applied clinical experience. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 is required for students to maintain good standing in the program and for graduation.

Application and Admission

On the average, the communication disorders and sciences program admits 30 master’s degree applicants each year. Applicants should have a minimum overall GPA of 3.00 with a 3.50 GPA in their major. The Graduate Record Examination is required for admission.

Students for whom English is not a native language must pass the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a score of 600 or above for the paper version or a score of 100 or above for the Internet-based version. International students who plan to participate in clinical practicums and work toward national certification by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association must pass the Speaking Proficiency English Assessment Kit (SPEAK) test with a score of 50.

Applications for admission are available online at the communication disorders and sciences website. Application materials must be received by January 15 for entry the following September.

Master of Arts Degree Requirements
CDS 606Special Problems: [Topic]1-3
CDS 607Seminar: [Topic]1
CDS 608Workshop: [Topic] (Evidence-Based Project Research)3
CDS 609Practicum: [Topic] (Externship)1-15
CDS 609Practicum: [Topic] (September Experience)3
CDS 609Practicum: [Topic] (Speech-Language-Hearing)1-4
CDS 625Final Full-Time Practicum1-15
CDS 626Professional Practices in the Schools1
CDS 649Assessment and Treatment of Feeding and Swallowing Disorders4
CDS 651School-Age Language Disorders4
CDS 652Speech Sound Disorders4
CDS 654Management of Adult Language Disorders4
CDS 655Stuttering3
CDS 656Voice Science and Disorders3
CDS 657Augmentative Procedures for Communication Disorders2
CDS 660Motor Speech Disorders3
CDS 663Management of Acquired Cognitive Disorders4
CDS 665Language Disorders in Children4
CDS 706Special Problems: [Topic]1-3
Total Credits48-83

The MA requires the equivalent of two years of a second language.

Master of Science Degree Requirements
CDS 606Special Problems: [Topic]1-3
CDS 607Seminar: [Topic]1
CDS 608Workshop: [Topic] (Evidence-Based Project Research)3
CDS 609Practicum: [Topic] (Externship)1-15
CDS 609Practicum: [Topic] (September Experience)3
CDS 609Practicum: [Topic] (Speech-Language-Hearing)1-4
CDS 625Final Full-Time Practicum1-15
CDS 626Professional Practices in the Schools1
CDS 649Assessment and Treatment of Feeding and Swallowing Disorders4
CDS 651School-Age Language Disorders4
CDS 652Speech Sound Disorders4
CDS 654Management of Adult Language Disorders4
CDS 655Stuttering3
CDS 656Voice Science and Disorders3
CDS 657Augmentative Procedures for Communication Disorders2
CDS 660Motor Speech Disorders3
CDS 663Management of Acquired Cognitive Disorders4
CDS 665Language Disorders in Children4
CDS 706Special Problems: [Topic]1-3
Total Credits48-83
ASHA Requirements

In addition to the core master’s degree requirements, additional course work may be needed to fulfill ASHA certification requirements. Of the 50 credits, 36 must be taken at the graduate level.

Doctoral Degree

McKay Moore Sohlberg, Program Director
541-346-2586
541-346-6778 fax
HEDCO Education Building, Second Floor

The doctoral degree (PhD) in communication disorders and sciences emphasizes advanced knowledge, scholarship, leadership, and clinical competence in the areas of speech-language acquisition, speech-language pathology, and assessment and intervention strategies. The doctoral degree program is designed to meet the needs of students from various backgrounds and to train future scholars in the profession.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

Dissertation research18
Courses in primary area of specialization21
Courses in collateral or secondary area9
Research methodology24
Other required courses6
Total Credits78

Options for primary area of specialization include child and adolescent language, early language, swallowing, cognitive rehabilitation, and multicultural issues. The collateral or secondary area may involve courses in more than one academic department. Examples of collateral areas are neuropsychology, linguistics, or developmental psychology. Doctoral students must choose an area of research interest (e.g., single-subject or quantitative methodologies). Other requirements are detailed in the Doctoral Program Handbook, available through the program office.

Application and Admission

Students should have a GPA of at least 3.50 and have taken the Graduate Record Examination. Most applicants have a master’s degree and their certificate of clinical competence upon admission.

Applications for admission are available online at the Communication Disorders and Sciences website. Application materials must be received by January 15 for entry the following September.

Upon admission and in consultation with the student, an academic advisor is selected, taking into account the student’s personal and professional goals. This advisor chairs the student’s program committee.

Special Education

Wendy Machalicek, Program Director
142 Lorry I. Lokey Education Building
541-346-4404
wmachali@uoregon.edu

Master’s and doctoral degrees are offered under the special education major. The master’s specializations include early intervention–early childhood and kindergarten through 12th grade, cross-categorical. The doctoral focus includes emphases in positive behavior support, low-incidence disabilities, early intervention, prevention and academic interventions, and secondary-transition services.

Graduates attain positions in the United States and abroad working in community- and family-based programs; teaching young children; conducting individual and group intervention programs; managing residential living centers; coordinating in-service training programs; consulting with teachers about educating children with disabilities in general-education classrooms and school settings; conducting research; serving in higher-education faculty positions; working in the administration of special-education programs; and delivering best practices in collaboration with a variety of professions in a range of settings.

Students earn initial teaching credentials in licensure and endorsement programs but can also pursue the master’s degree to enhance their skills as early interventionists, special education teachers, or consultants; to work in adult service programs for people with disabilities; or to prepare for the doctoral program.

The doctoral program in special education prepares individuals for research and teaching positions in higher education, research positions with private foundations, administrative positions in school districts and other state educational agencies, and consultation positions in professional education.

Master’s Degree

Students may work toward a master of arts (MA), master of science (MS), or master of education (MEd) degree in several areas of special education. For the MA degree the candidate must demonstrate proficiency in a second language. For the MEd degree the candidate must have a valid teaching license and have completed at least one year of successful classroom teaching in the United States.

The program of study leading to the master’s degree requires a minimum of 45 credits of graduate work. The program of study includes required core courses, associated field studies, electives, and a terminal project.

Doctoral Degree

The department offers doctor of education (DEd) and doctor of philosophy (PhD) degrees with focus areas in positive behavior support, low-incidence disabilities, early intervention, prevention and academic interventions, and secondary and transition services. The doctoral degree program provides advanced training in preparation for leadership positions in special education. The program requires approximately 90 credits beyond the master’s degree and is designed for full-time students. Typically, students complete the program in four years. Financial assistance is awarded based on the applicant’s qualifications. The program uses a cohort model, which students begin fall term.

Applications for Admission

Admissions information and application materials are available on the department’s website. Materials also may be requested by telephone, mail, e-mail, or in person from the department office. Master's and doctoral students are admitted fall term. Applications must be received by early December for doctoral applicants and by early May for master’s applicants. Priority deadline for application review of master's applicants is early January. See the website for specific program deadlines.

School Psychology

Ben Clarke, Program Director
375 HEDCO Education Building
clarkeb@uoregon.edu
541-346-2156

https://education.uoregon.edu/program/school-psychology

The nationally recognized school psychology program offers master’s and doctoral degrees and provides service courses to other College of Education and university programs. The doctoral program is accredited by the American Psychological Association Commission on Accreditation (750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242, 202-336-5979) and both the MS and PhD programs have approval from the National Association of School Psychologists. Both the master’s and doctoral programs are approved by the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission for the education and licensure of school psychologists in the state.

The program’s focus is prevention and early intervention. It prepares psychologists as leaders and innovators who can identify, assess, and remedy the social and educational problems of children and adults. Students are trained to be scientists and practitioners from an ecological, data-oriented perspective.

Each student’s program of study is tailored to allow development of individual strengths and interests. Master’s and doctoral students take course work in the following general areas: psychological and educational foundations of school psychology: psychometrics, assessment, and research; methods of school-based intervention; professional school psychology; application of research skills; and practicum experiences. Every student must complete a one-year, full-time internship. Doctoral students also complete a supervised college teaching experience.

Graduates of the school psychology program find positions in the United States and abroad, in schools and in other settings. These positions include teaching and providing services at infant, preschool, school-age, and adult levels; conducting individual and group intervention programs; coordinating in-service training programs; consulting with teachers about educating children with disabilities and other at-risk students; conducting research, teaching, and coordinating school psychology training programs in colleges and universities; working in the administration of special education programs; and delivering a range of psychological and educational services in collaboration with a variety of professionals.

Master’s Degree

The master’s degree program in school psychology requires a minimum of 92 credits, and typically takes three years to complete, including a sequence of supervised field experiences, practicums, and a 1,200-hour internship. The master’s program is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists and the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission. Graduates of this program meet State of Oregon licensure requirements and are eligible for the nationally certified school psychologist credential offered by the National Association of School Psychologists.

Psychological and educational foundations8
Measurement and assessment14
Statistics and research (course work, participation in a research team, and dissertation research)11
Practice of school psychology (teaching, supervision, and practicum experience)37
School psychology practicum or internship22
Total Credits92

Doctoral Degree

The doctoral program includes an individualized plan of study with 160 credits minimum, culminating in an original research dissertation, a predoctoral internship, and the doctor of philosophy (PhD) degree. Students may enter the doctoral program with or without a master’s degree. Prior graduate course work may reduce the amount of time needed to finish the doctoral program.

The program prepares students to qualify for licensure as a professional psychologist through the state board of psychologist examiners, as well as state certification or licensure as a school psychologist in Oregon and most other states. Students who complete this program are eligible for the nationally certified school psychologist credential offered by the National Association of School Psychologists.

Psychological and educational foundations33
Measurement and assessment16
Statistics and research (course work, participation in a research team, and dissertation research)49
Practice of school psychology (teaching, supervision, and practicum experience)40
School psychology practicum or internship22
Total Credits160

Application and Admission

Prospective applicants may request detailed admission policies and procedures and applications for admission from the department’s academic secretary, or find them on the program’s website. Students are admitted for fall term only.

Applicants are evaluated on

  • academic record
  • letters of recommendation
  • previous related work or experiences
  • a statement of purpose in seeking admission
  • an interview
  • Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) general test scores

Applications and supplemental materials are submitted online. Completed applications must be received by December 15. After initial file screening, finalists will be selected and invited for interviews. 

Licensure Programs

The Department of Special Education and Clinical Sciences’ licensure programs in early intervention, school psychology, and special education meet requirements of the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission. The communication disorders program meets the requirements for licensure as a speech pathologist in Oregon. These licenses prepare individuals to work with the full range of students with disabilities from birth through high school. The program prepares graduates to work in direct and indirect roles with students with disabilities in homes, schools, and community-based programs.

Communication Disorders

McKay Moore Sohlberg, Major Director
541-346-2586
541-346-6778 fax
HEDCO Education Building, Second Floor

Early Intervention–Early Childhood Special Education Licensure and Endorsement

Jantina Clifford, Program Coordinator
541-346-2599
jantinac@uoregon.edu

The early intervention special education endorsement program prepares professionals to work with children who have mild to severe disabilities ranging from birth through primary school. The program integrates didactic course work with practical experience. Full-time students can complete the program in four to six terms.

Special Education Licensure

Elisa Jamgochian, Program Coordinator
ejamgoch@uoregon.edu
541-346-5185

The two-year special education licensure and endorsement program prepares preservice or in-service teachers to work with students with disabilities ages three to 21 in a variety of settings, including early childhood–elementary, middle, and high schools. Graduates of the program are prepared to apply for an initial special education teaching license and endorsement across these multiple levels.

The program is designed for

  • Individuals who hold a bachelor's degree in any area but want to pursue initial licensure in special education while concurrently completing a master's degree
  • Individuals who currently hold a teaching license but want to pursue an add-on special education endorsement
  • Individuals pursuing a master's program in an area other than special education who want to combine that degree with course work and experiences in special education

The program prepares professionals to help children and youth with disabilities succeed through rigorous course work and practicum experiences on topics including characteristics of learners and services, advanced assessment techniques, evidence-based approaches to designing and delivering instruction, effective classroom- and behavior-management techniques, collaborative practices, and transition services.

Admissions and Application

The application may be completed on the Graduate School website. This process includes a statement of professional goals and experience, a statement articulating experience working with individuals with disabilities, résumé, letters of recommendation, and transcripts.

Licensing Process

Upon completion of program requirements, graduates of the program are eligible to apply to the Oregon Teacher Standards and Practices Commission for their initial teaching license and/or an  endorsement in K–12 special education.

Courses

Course usage information

ASL 101. First-Year American Sign Language. 5 Credits.

Study of basic grammatical structure and vocabulary of American Sign Language, expressive and receptive finger-spelling, and introduction to American deaf culture.
Prereq: WR 122 or WR 123 or HC 221H or HC 231H.

Course usage information

ASL 102. First-Year American Sign Language. 5 Credits.

Increased receptive and expressive communication skills in ASL, and study of cultural values and behavioral rules of the deaf community.
Prereq: C- or better or P in ASL 101 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ASL 103. First-Year American Sign Language. 5 Credits.

Concentration on understanding and acquiring advanced conversational proficiency. Emphasis on ASL classifiers. Continued study of deaf culture as a linguistic minority.
Prereq: C- or better or P in ASL 102 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ASL 201. Second-Year American Sign Language. 4 Credits.

Applied conversational use of ASL through literature, narratives, poetry, and plays. Explores various underlying metaphors found in ASL literature.
Prereq: C- or better or P in ASL 103 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ASL 202. Second-Year American Sign Language. 4 Credits.

Emphasis on more abstract and challenging conversational and narrative ranges. Lab and readings cover historical aspects of deaf community and culture.
Prereq: C- or better or P in ASL 201 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ASL 203. Second-Year American Sign Language. 4 Credits.

Further emphasis on more abstract and challenging conversational and narrative ranges. Explores broader political and social activities of international deaf community.
Prereq: C- or better or P in ASL 202 or equivalent.

Course usage information

ASL 301. American Deaf Culture. 4 Credits.

Study of the relationship between small groups and dominant culture in the United States. Explore issues of language, culture, self-representation, identity, and social structure.

Course usage information

ASL 399. Special Studies: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

CDS 201. Communication Disorders in Society and Media. 4 Credits.

Survey of communication disorders and differences, comparing individual and social-cultural perspectives through popular media and real case examples.
Prereq: WR 121.

Course usage information

CDS 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-7 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 430. Speech Pathology-Audiology as Professions. 2 Credits.

Introduces the broad dimensions of the speech-language pathology and audiology professions. Begins undergraduate process of acquiring observation hours required for graduate school. Sequence with CDS 431.

Course usage information

CDS 431. Beginning Clinical Methods. 3 Credits.

Focuses on basic methods for assessment and intervention within an evidence-based framework. Includes fifteen hours of guided observation. Sequence with CDS 430.
Prereq: CDS 430.

Course usage information

CDS 442. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech Mechanism. 4 Credits.

Study of anatomy, physiology, and neurology of speech and language processes.

Course usage information

CDS 443. Acoustics of Speech. 4 Credits.

Acoustic measurement and analysis of sound production and reception in human communication.

Course usage information

CDS 444. Clinical Phonetics and Phonology. 4 Credits.

Focuses on sounds and symbols of American English, foreign accents, and dialects using broad and narrow transcription methods. Presents speech production, distinctive features, and basics of phonology.
Prereq: CDS 442, 450.

Course usage information

CDS 446. Services for Deaf Students. 3 Credits.

Provides understanding of deaf and hard-of-hearing students’ educational experiences and includes the cultural, linguistic, social, and pedagogical factors contributing to successful service provision.

Course usage information

CDS 450. Introduction to Language Development. 4 Credits.

Primary focus on the development of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and literacy.
Prereq: LING 150 and WR 122 or 123.

Course usage information

CDS 451. Later Language Development. 4 Credits.

Designed to promote an in-depth study of language development in school-age children, adolescents, and young adults (ages 6–20 years).
Prereq: CDS 450.

Course usage information

CDS 455. Child and Adolescent Development. 4 Credits.

Covers theories, norms, and concepts related to child and adolescent development. Geared toward allied health professionals and educators working in a variety of settings.

Course usage information

CDS 457. Fundamentals of Audiology. 4 Credits.

Anatomy and physiology of hearing and vestibular systems; causes, types, and symptomatologies of hearing impairment.

Course usage information

CDS 458. Audiology Disorders and Treatment. 4 Credits.

Pure tone, speech and impedance audiometry. Special tests, difficult-to-test populations, and central auditory processing. Audiogram interpretation and report writing.
Prereq: CDS 457/557.

Course usage information

CDS 460. Developmental Disorders in Communication. 4 Credits.

Explores growth and developmental disorders that cause or contribute to child and adult speech, language, and fluency impairments.
Prereq: CDS 450.

Course usage information

CDS 462. Acquired Disorders of Communication. 4 Credits.

Explores neurologic disorders that cause or contribute to child and adult speech, language, and voice impairments.
Prereq: CDS 470.

Course usage information

CDS 470. Neuroscience of Speech and Language. 4 Credits.

Foundation in normal neuroanatomy and neurophysiology and the clinical signs observed with nervous-system damage.
Prereq: CDS 442.

Course usage information

CDS 503. Thesis. 1-15 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 542. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech Mechanism. 4 Credits.

Study of anatomy, physiology, and neurology of speech and language processes.

Course usage information

CDS 543. Acoustics of Speech. 4 Credits.

Acoustic measurement and analysis of sound production and reception in human communication.

Course usage information

CDS 544. Clinical Phonetics and Phonology. 4 Credits.

Focuses on sounds and symbols of American English, foreign accents, and dialects using broad and narrow transcription methods. Presents speech production, distinctive features, and basics of phonology.

Course usage information

CDS 550. Introduction to Language Development. 4 Credits.

Primary focus on the development of phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, and literacy.

Course usage information

CDS 551. Later Language Development. 4 Credits.

Designed to promote an in-depth study of language development in school-age children, adolescents, and young adults (ages 6–20 years).

Course usage information

CDS 557. Fundamentals of Audiology. 4 Credits.

Anatomy and physiology of hearing and vestibular systems; causes, types, and symptomatologies of hearing impairment.

Course usage information

CDS 558. Audiology Disorders and Treatment. 4 Credits.

Pure tone, speech and impedance audiometry. Special tests, difficult-to-test populations, and central auditory processing. Audiogram interpretation and report writing.

Course usage information

CDS 560. Developmental Disorders in Communication. 4 Credits.

Explores growth and developmental disorders that cause or contribute to child and adult speech, language, and fluency impairments.

Course usage information

CDS 562. Acquired Disorders of Communication. 4 Credits.

Explores neurologic disorders that cause or contribute to child and adult speech, language, and voice impairments.

Course usage information

CDS 570. Neuroscience of Speech and Language. 4 Credits.

Foundation in normal neuroanatomy and neurophysiology and the clinical signs observed with nervous-system damage.
Prereq: CDS 542.

Course usage information

CDS 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 606. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-3 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Multicultural Issues in Communication Disorders and Sciences, Dysphagia, Professional Ethics.

Course usage information

CDS 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 611. Clinical Methods. 1 Credit.

Provides methodology behind the sound clinical practices and fundamentals of the UO Speech-Language-Hearing Center operations. Prepares students to begin working with clients.

Course usage information

CDS 625. Final Full-Time Practicum. 1-15 Credits.

Diagnostic and treatment experience in the public school setting. Repeatable once for maximum of 30 credits.

Course usage information

CDS 626. Professional Practices in the Schools. 1 Credit.

Helps students critically assess and integrate their fieldwork and course work in the broader context of the school experience.
Coreq: CDS 625.

Course usage information

CDS 630. Scientific Clinical Decision Making. 3 Credits.

Critically analyzes research in communication disorders through evaluation of research articles and standardized tests enabling clinicians to make decisions based on scientific evidence.

Course usage information

CDS 649. Assessment and Treatment of Feeding and Swallowing Disorders. 4 Credits.

Nature and characteristics of feeding and swallowing; methods of evaluation and management of feeding and swallowing in adults and children.

Course usage information

CDS 651. School-Age Language Disorders. 4 Credits.

Presents normal language development and language disorders in school-age children and adolescents. Emphasizes contributions from linguistics, psychology, education, and learning theory.

Course usage information

CDS 652. Speech Sound Disorders. 4 Credits.

Causes and consequences of phonological disorders; principles and procedures for assessment and intervention.

Course usage information

CDS 654. Management of Adult Language Disorders. 4 Credits.

Provides a foundation in diagnosis and treatment of adult neurogenic language disorders, concentrating on aphasia and the cognitive-linguistic changes associated with dementia.

Course usage information

CDS 655. Stuttering. 2 Credits.

Focuses on contemporary issues in stuttering. Discusses and critically evaluates current theories and research findings.

Course usage information

CDS 656. Voice Science and Disorders. 3 Credits.

Anatomy and physiology of vocal mechanism; diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for various voice disorders.

Course usage information

CDS 657. Augmentative Procedures for Communication Disorders. 2 Credits.

Recent advancements in design, development, and use of systems supplemental to vocal speech and language.

Course usage information

CDS 660. Motor Speech Disorders. 3 Credits.

Advanced study of speech disorders associated with lesions of central and peripheral nervous systems.

Course usage information

CDS 663. Management of Acquired Cognitive Disorders. 4 Credits.

Examines current theory and practice in cognitive rehabilitation. Reviews models and tools for treating attention, memory, and dysexecutive syndromes.
Prereq: CDS 662.

Course usage information

CDS 665. Language Disorders in Children. 4 Credits.

Child language disorders and related topics, including principles of assessment and intervention, cultural awareness and sensitivity, clinical application, and working with families.

Course usage information

CDS 706. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 707. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 708. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 709. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

CDS 710. Experimental Course [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

SPSY 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 406. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 503. Thesis. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 617. Tests and Measurements in Education. 4 Credits.

Introduction to measurement. Provides a theoretical and practical basis for evaluating and using the wide range of test and measurement data in educational research.
Prereq: undergraduate statistics or educational psychology course or equivalent.

Course usage information

SPSY 626. Final Supervised Field Experience. 1-15 Credits.

Repeatable. Limited to students in school psychology program for basic endorsement for an Oregon license.

Course usage information

SPSY 630. Introduction to Consultation. 3-4 Credits.

Provides students with basic knowledge and skills in the area of school-based consultation.

Course usage information

SPSY 631. Academic and Behavioral Interventions. 4 Credits.

Focuses on the application of behavior analytic interventions in applied settings.

Course usage information

SPSY 632. Advanced Consultation. 4 Credits.

Develops and refines competencies in school-based consultation, and provides opportunities for students to practice consultation skills.

Course usage information

SPSY 650. Developmental Psychopathology. 4 Credits.

Overview of developmental psychopathology, with emphasis on childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood. Covers phenomenology, etiology, development, classification systems, and prognosis of major psychological disorders.

Course usage information

SPSY 651. Cognitive-Affective Aspects of Behavior. 4-5 Credits.

Examination of cognitive and affective foundations of human behavior. Emphasis on reciprocal influences of cognition and emotion. Selected topics in attention,language, memory, thinking, reasoning. Offered alternate years.

Course usage information

SPSY 652. Biological Aspects of Behavior. 4-5 Credits.

Provides the appropriate background for students to meet biological psychology course work requirement for board licensure as a psychologist.

Course usage information

SPSY 661. Principles and Practices in School Psychology. 4 Credits.

Theory, role, and function of school psychology in its relation to learning and the school setting.

Course usage information

SPSY 662. Foundations of Clinical Supervision. 3 Credits.

Introduction to theory and practice of clinical supervision. Overview of supervision models, factors affecting the supervision relationship, supervision and evaluation techniques, legal and ethical considerations.

Course usage information

SPSY 663. Professional Ethics. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the study of current ethical standards of professional practice for school psychologists and behavior analysts.

Course usage information

SPSY 671. Behavioral Assessment. 4 Credits.

Principles, techniques, and conceptual and practical issues in behavioral assessment; applied aspects include data gathering and interpretation as well as report writing.

Course usage information

SPSY 672. Intellectual Assessment. 4 Credits.

Covers individual assessment of learning aptitude. Includes administering, scoring, and interpreting intelligence tests as well as report writing. Reviews theories of intelligence.

Course usage information

SPSY 674. Educational Assessment. 4 Credits.

Methods of educational assessment designed to develop and evaluate instructional interventions; topics include systematic observations, curriculum-based assessment, and teacher interviews.

Course usage information

SPSY 704. Internship: [Topic]. 1-15 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 706. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPSY 709. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Courses

Course usage information

SPED 198. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-2 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPED 401. Research: [Topic]. 1-12 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPED 405. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPED 406. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPED 407. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Collaborative Team, Introduction to Talented and Gifted, Introduction to Developmental Disabilities.

Course usage information

SPED 408. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPED 409. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Special Education, Talented and Gifted.

Course usage information

SPED 410. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPED 411. Foundations of Disability I. 3 Credits.

Categorical and cross-categorical survey of information about exceptional children and youths. Topics include history, etiology, identification, classification, legislation, alternate program delivery systems.

Course usage information

SPED 412. Foundations of Disability II. 3 Credits.

Overview of special education and disability studies; social construction of disability; personal perspectives; societal imagery concerning disability.

Course usage information

SPED 422. Special Education Mathematics Instruction. 4 Credits.

Systematic instruction of mathematics skills for students with disabilities: assessment, planning, curriculum modification, diagnosis and remediation of persistent error patterns, evaluation.

Course usage information

SPED 426. Behavior and Classroom Management. 4 Credits.

Provides behavior management procedures for a variety of educational environments. Emphasizes functional assessment-based behavior support planning, classroom management, and principles of applied behavior analysis.

Course usage information

SPED 431. Introduction to Learning Disabilities. 3 Credits.

Introduces major topics, issues, and trends in learning disabilities. Addresses the history, definitions, etiologies, theories, characteristics, instructional interventions, and service-delivery models.

Course usage information

SPED 432. Introduction to Behavioral Disorders. 3 Credits.

Introduces the characteristics and education of children and youth who have emotional and behavioral disorders.
Prereq: SPED 411.

Course usage information

SPED 436. Advanced Behavior and Classroom Management. 3 Credits.

Emphasizes functional assessment-based behavior support planning, individual education plans (IEPs), and effective behavior support systems for a variety of educational environments.
Prereq: SPED 426.

Course usage information

SPED 440. Early Literacy for Diverse Learners. 4 Credits.

Focuses on designing and evaluating instruction in the areas of reading and writing for preschool- to early elementary-aged students with disabilities. Sequence with SPED 441, 442, 443.

Course usage information

SPED 441. Intermediate Literacy for Diverse Learners. 4 Credits.

Focuses on designing and evaluating instruction in the areas of reading and writing for late elementary- to middle school-aged students with disabilities. Sequence with SPED 440, 442, 443.
Prereq: SPED 440.

Course usage information

SPED 442. Adolescent Literacy for Diverse Learners. 4 Credits.

Focuses on designing and evaluating instruction in the areas of reading and writing for middle school- and high school-aged students with disabilities. Sequence with SPED 440, 441, 443.
Prereq: SPED 441.

Course usage information

SPED 443. Supporting Students with Low-Incidence Disability. 4 Credits.

Provides skills on how to plan, coordinate, deliver, and evaluate evidence-based instruction for students with low-incidence disabilities. Sequence with SPED 440, 441, 442.
Prereq: SPED 442.

Course usage information

SPED 488. Professional Practices: [Topic]. 1-3 Credits.

Helps students critically assess their fieldwork and integrate fieldwork and course work in the wider context of the school experience. Repeatable twice.
Coreq: SPED 406 or 409.

Course usage information

SPED 503. Thesis. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPED 507. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Collaborative Team, Introduction to Talented and Gifted, Introduction to Developmental Disabilities.

Course usage information

SPED 508. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-21 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPED 510. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

Course usage information

SPED 511. Foundations of Disability I. 3 Credits.

Categorical and cross-categorical survey of information about exceptional children and youths. Topics include history, etiology, identification, classification, legislation, alternate program delivery systems.

Course usage information

SPED 512. Foundations of Disability II. 3 Credits.

Overview of special education and disability studies; social construction of disability; personal perspectives; societal imagery concerning disability.

Course usage information

SPED 522. Special Education Mathematics Instruction. 4 Credits.

Systematic instruction of mathematics skills for students with disabilities: assessment, planning, curriculum modification, diagnosis and remediation of persistent error patterns, evaluation.

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SPED 526. Behavior and Classroom Management. 4 Credits.

Provides behavior management procedures for a variety of educational environments. Emphasizes functional assessment-based behavior support planning, classroom management, and principles of applied behavior analysis.

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SPED 531. Introduction to Learning Disabilities. 3 Credits.

Introduces major topics, issues, and trends in learning disabilities. Addresses the history, definitions, etiologies, theories, characteristics, instructional interventions, and service-delivery models.

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SPED 532. Introduction to Behavioral Disorders. 3 Credits.

Introduces the characteristics and education of children and youth who have emotional and behavioral disorders.
Prereq: SPED 411/511.

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SPED 536. Advanced Behavior and Classroom Management. 3 Credits.

Emphasizes functional assessment-based behavior support planning, individual education plans (IEPs), and effective behavior support systems for a variety of educational environments.
Prereq: SPED 426/526.

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SPED 540. Early Literacy for Diverse Learners. 4 Credits.

Focuses on designing and evaluating instruction in the areas of reading and writing for preschool- to early elementary-aged students with disabilities. Sequence with SPED 541, 542, 543.

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SPED 541. Intermediate Literacy for Diverse Learners. 4 Credits.

Focuses on designing and evaluating instruction in the areas of reading and writing for late elementary- to middle school-aged students with disabilities. Sequence with SPED 540, 542, 543.
Prereq: SPED 540.

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SPED 542. Adolescent Literacy for Diverse Learners. 4 Credits.

Focuses on designing and evaluating instruction in the areas of reading and writing for middle school- and high school-aged students with disabilities. Sequence with SPED 540, 541, 543.
Prereq: SPED 541.

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SPED 543. Supporting Students with Low-Incidence Disability. 4 Credits.

Provides skills on how to plan, coordinate, deliver, and evaluate evidence-based instruction for students with low-incidence disabilities. Sequence with SPED 540, 541, 542.
Prereq: SPED 542.

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SPED 588. Professional Practices: [Topic]. 1-3 Credits.

Helps students critically assess their fieldwork and integrate fieldwork and course work in the wider context of the school experience. Repeatable.
Coreq: SPED 606 or 609.

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SPED 601. Research: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPED 602. Supervised College Teaching. 1-9 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPED 603. Dissertation. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPED 605. Reading and Conference: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPED 606. Field Studies: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPED 607. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable. Recent topics include Advanced Applied Behavioral Analysis, Doctoral Orientation, Program Evaluation, Project Aim.

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SPED 608. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-10 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPED 609. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-16 Credits.

Repeatable. Topics include Classroom Consultation; College Teaching; Elementary I,II; Program Evaluation; Research.

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SPED 610. Experimental Course: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPED 622. History of Special Education and Disability. 3 Credits.

Historical context for contemporary issues in understanding and supporting the lives of people with disabilities and their families.

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SPED 625. Final Supervised Field Experience. 1-15 Credits.

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SPED 626. Grant Writing. 1-3 Credits.

Provides structure and guidance in developing a grant proposal.

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SPED 628. Law and Special Education. 3 Credits.

Knowledge of current case law and legislation, sensitivity to legal issues, application to legal principles related to special education services in school settings.

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SPED 632. Collaborative Educational Planning. 3 Credits.

Collaborating to identify unique needs of individuals with disabilities and establish legally correct, educationally useful IEPs, and to use knowledge of effective interventions to meet needs.
Prereq: SPED 628 or equivalent.

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SPED 633. Transition Planning and Instruction I. 3 Credits.

Focuses on preparing youth for postsecondary education and training. Development of skills for using assessment-planning and content-instruction strategies to assist students with disabilities. Sequence with SPED 634.

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SPED 634. . 3 Credits.

Focuses on strategies for improving employment and independent-living skills; using individualized assessment and planning strategies, curriculum and instructional strategies, and program delivery to assist students with disabilities. Sequence with SPED 633.

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SPED 655. Supervised Field Experience. 5-12 Credits.

Repeatable. Provides practical experience in teaching students with disabilities in a public-school setting under the direction of cooperating teachers and university supervisors.

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SPED 660. Design of Instruction. 4 Credits.

Design, development, and evaluation of instructional materials for children with disabilities. Emphasis on analysis and construction of instructional sequences for various learning tasks.

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SPED 680. Foundations in Early Childhood and Early Intervention. 3 Credits.

Conceptual underpinnings and practical application of an approach to early intervention that links assessment, intervention, and evaluation.

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SPED 681. Family-Guided Early Intervention. 3 Credits.

Covers procedures for family assessment, intervention, and evaluation. Addresses adult communication and management strategies.

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SPED 682. Assessment and Evaluation. 3 Credits.

Presents assessment and evaluation materials used in early intervention programs and provides methods for using these materials.

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SPED 683. Curriculum in Early Childhood and Early Intervention. 3 Credits.

Presents curricular materials covering development from birth to six years. Discusses procedures for use and modification.

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SPED 684. Applications of a Linked System I. 2 Credits.

Provides opportunities for students to implement activities in a linked approach to early intervention services; foundation for an understanding of the components of a linked system. Sequence with SPED 685.

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SPED 685. Applications of a Linked System II. 1 Credit.

Examines the components of a linked system, how they influence one another, and how they are implemented within a best-practices model for early intervention–early childhood special education. Sequence with SPED 684.
Prereq: SPED 684.

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SPED 686. Autism in Early Intervention. 2-3 Credits.

Information is given regarding the etiology of autism, diagnostic/evaluation procedures and current evidence-based strategies for supporting young children with autism spectrum disorder and their families.

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SPED 687. Early Intervention Methods I. 1-3 Credits.

Provides practical information for conducting program-relevant assessments using curriculum-based assessment tools and for developing individualized family service plans.

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SPED 688. Early Intervention Methods II. 1-3 Credits.

Provides opportunity to develop effective intervention skills to use with young children who are at risk and disabled and with their families.

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SPED 689. Early Intervention Methods III. 1-2 Credits.

Focuses on advanced methods in early intervention, including special handling and management techniques.

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SPED 690. Early Intervention Methods IV. 1-2 Credits.

Develops advanced intervention skills to use with young children who are at risk and disabled and with their families.

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SPED 706. Special Problems: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPED 707. Seminar: [Topic]. 1-5 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPED 708. Workshop: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.

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SPED 709. Practicum: [Topic]. 1-6 Credits.

Repeatable.